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Picture of RichardC
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quote:
Originally posted by Fredward:
At the risk of sounding patronizing, I believe the Rocksett comment was a joke. It's permanent. Din't mean to be an ass, but I don't want you to ruin your barrel, either.


It wasn't joking, and certainly wouldn't try to help someone ruin their barrel.

On a Beretta and an FNX, the O rings alone weren't doing the job.

For a thread protector, I've used a small drop, twist it on finger tight, let it sit overnight, but do not do the oven heat cure.


Here's is the maker's tips sheet:



"Rocksett Tip Sheet
Think of Rocksett as waterbased solution of glass. The instructions call for a certain time and temperature Which works well under perfect conditions. There are a few ways to cure Rocksett based on many different applications. "


"A light application can dry at room temperature in a 24-hour period, with good strength. Follow this up with 20 minutes of heat at 175 degrees, for a normal cure method.
If you applied a fair amount of adhesive you may get better results by a slow rise bake/ cook method, say from room temp to 300 F (linear steps) in say six hours. "

"The only way to break a proper Rocksett bond is to soak the part in hot water for 20 minutes or more and then forcibly remove the components. "


Here is a discussion:
https://www.m4carbine.net/show...a-mount-with-rockset

I've been able to remove thread protectors, suppressor mounts and thread protectors with just mechanical twisting off.
As commented in that other discussion, it is about as strong as blue Locktite, but more heat resistant.


_____________________
“The people never give up their liberties but under some delusion.”
Edmund Burke, Speech at Country Meeting of Buckinghamshire, 1784
 
Posts: 11755 | Location: Florida | Registered: June 23, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
I have not yet begun
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That’s a NO on the Rocksett. I would like to be able to field strip and clean without soaking the gun in hot water, then using force.
The only thing I would have to grab on a pistol would be the slide/grip. It may work on a rifle but but I really do want to subject my frame rails to that.
You can’t take the barrel out of the slide with the thread protector on.

Leaving it off would defeat the purpose of the protector. Stuff happens, I would prefer it didn’t happen to the threads.


--------
After the game, the King and the pawn go into the same box.
 
Posts: 3559 | Location: North of AZ hell | Registered: October 26, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I just take mine off if I want to shoot without the suppressor. Keep it simple.


________________________________________

-- Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past me I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain. --
 
Posts: 15408 | Location: New Mexico | Registered: October 14, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Holy cow, where do I start ?

1) No Rocksett, ever on anything that is to be removed periodically.

2) No Loctite

3) No pliers and you're not working on my car if you are running around with pliers in your hand.
If you feel you need more than hand tight, then protect the thread protector from Idiot Marks by padding it with a piece of rubber tire tube (or similar)

4) Anti-seize is messy. It has metal particles in it, typically. You're not building an engine. Why go there ?

My thread protectors stay in place with a Viton O-ring and some light grease on the threads.

YMMV
 
Posts: 391 | Registered: November 03, 2019Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I got a huge pack of high temp o rings from Amazon and so far they are holding up great on my threaded 19 with plenty of carry and shooting.
 
Posts: 2351 | Location: Pnw | Registered: March 21, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Another Viton o-ring user. never had one loosen up or cook, I just take them off if I'm going to shoot suppressed.
 
Posts: 1972 | Location: Atlanta, GA / Mountain City, TN | Registered: February 24, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
I have not yet begun
to procrastinate
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by sigfreund:
I have heard of using plumbers’ Teflon tape to keep thread protectors in place.

So I tried this and so far it’s been working.
I folded over the Teflon tape to double the thickness and reduce the width then snugged down the protector with padded pliers. So far, so good.
I was thinking about using the o-ring but the barrel doesn’t really have a defined shoulder. I was concerned the o-ring would just get pushed out of the way.

Thanks Sigfreund for the tip.


--------
After the game, the King and the pawn go into the same box.
 
Posts: 3559 | Location: North of AZ hell | Registered: October 26, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Check your thread protector. I have ones that clearly use the shoulder of barrel. I also have ones the the O Ring fits very nicely INSIDE the thread protector at the front.
 
Posts: 2909 | Registered: June 18, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of RichardC
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quote:
Originally posted by pedropcola:
Check your thread protector. I have ones that clearly use the shoulder of barrel. I also have ones the the O Ring fits very nicely INSIDE the thread protector at the front.


That's interesting. Does one style work better than the other?


_____________________
“The people never give up their liberties but under some delusion.”
Edmund Burke, Speech at Country Meeting of Buckinghamshire, 1784
 
Posts: 11755 | Location: Florida | Registered: June 23, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I also just take off the thread protector when I get to the range. When I'm done shooting, I wipe down the threads with some oil and put the thread protector back on until next time.



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Posts: 1747 | Location: Semmes, Alabama | Registered: June 15, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Last Sunday, FNX-45, O ring only, I had to retighten the thread cap after every IDPA stage.

Thread protector with toothpick tip sized drop of Rocksett has been on Beretta M9 for several hundred rounds.

Yesterday, soaked it in cold water for a couple hours, wrapped rubber band around the knurled cap and it came right off, no drama.

With just the factory O ring, it had come loose very often, just like the FNX and the thread protectors with only O rings on my PCC's.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: RichardC,


_____________________
“The people never give up their liberties but under some delusion.”
Edmund Burke, Speech at Country Meeting of Buckinghamshire, 1784
 
Posts: 11755 | Location: Florida | Registered: June 23, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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They both work fine. The shoulder version is certainly easier to replace the O ring. The O rings last forever-ish though so not really an issue.
 
Posts: 2909 | Registered: June 18, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by RichardC:
Last Sunday, FNX-45, O ring only, I had to retighten the thread cap after every IDPA stage.

Thread protector with toothpick tip sized drop of Rocksett has been on Beretta M9 for several hundred rounds.

Yesterday, soaked it in cold water for a couple hours, wrapped rubber band around the knurled cap and it came right off, no drama.

With just the factory O ring, it had come loose very often, just like the FNX and the thread protectors with only O rings on my PCC's.

Humans each have their own idea on what a tiny amount is.
Therefore, turning the masses loose with Rocksett would be like letting a baby play with a hand grenade.
Other than that, great idea.
 
Posts: 391 | Registered: November 03, 2019Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of RichardC
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Not to belabor the point but genuinely interested:

Those of you having success with only an O ring, do you just turn them finger tight, or use a tool to get a little additional torque?

I realize that finger tight might be much more forceful from some of us than others.


_____________________
“The people never give up their liberties but under some delusion.”
Edmund Burke, Speech at Country Meeting of Buckinghamshire, 1784
 
Posts: 11755 | Location: Florida | Registered: June 23, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by RichardC:
Not to belabor the point but genuinely interested:

Those of you having success with only an O ring, do you just turn them finger tight, or use a tool to get a little additional torque?

I realize that finger tight might be much more forceful from some of us than others.

I do finger tight.
After a certain tightness you start destroying (cutting) the O-ring, so you want to avoid that.
You check it during the session and apply more tightness as needed.
 
Posts: 391 | Registered: November 03, 2019Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I go finger tight. As tight as I can but no tools. Sig 320 and SP01 Tactical in centerfire. I check them throughout range sessions and they don’t move. Hell I have a TandemKross 22 comp (no jokes please. Lol) that uses a big O ring. Only way to time it correctly is to tighten it and it’s not even tight. It is always half a turn short of snug. My buddy was convinced it would never work. That sucker doesn’t move.

Your experience with O rings not working I suspect is an outlier. I don’t grease or lube it or anything. I pull it out dry and use it. No issues.
 
Posts: 2909 | Registered: June 18, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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If you have high quality (meaning high temp) oring you are not going to destroy the oring no matter the torque you put on it. tighten that sucker till it doesn't come loose. Hand tight has worked for me, but if I had to tweak it a bit mechanically I would. The idea of having to soak your barrel to do maintenance makes the rocksett idea to me a non starter (and I wanted to say worse).


“So in war, the way is to avoid what is strong, and strike at what is weak.”
 
Posts: 8919 | Registered: October 14, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by hrcjon:
If you have high quality (meaning high temp) oring you are not going to destroy the oring no matter the torque you put on it.

That's BS.
You can cut an O-ring simply by backing out (let alone over-torquing) if it gets caught in the threads.
If you feel it getting caught, run it back in a touch to free it.
 
Posts: 391 | Registered: November 03, 2019Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I am not sure what are you talking about? You put the oring on to the barrel shoulder and ultimately compress it with the thread protector. How it is getting caught in the threads? That certainly isn't an issue "backing out". In any case my point is that decent high temp orings can have pretty good hardness characteristics compared to the everyday stuff and will 'probably' be quite durable in this application. Certainly there are a zillion combinations of barrel shoulders, thread protectors and o ring size so its not a guarantee that this is your solution.


“So in war, the way is to avoid what is strong, and strike at what is weak.”
 
Posts: 8919 | Registered: October 14, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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