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New to me W German Sig P226 Login/Join 
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Seems like a bit of an odd ball. Bare stainless frame and slide without any import markings. 94 according to the FAQ (KE code).
Not a showroom condition but a very solid pistol. Shoots insanely precise in the hands of a total novice Smile
I did a normal disassembly/maintenance/clean and lube and it seems to be a perfect machine. Normal wear and nicks and scuffs that don’t really bother me but I do admire the quality and precision of this piece.
Ordered some nill wood grips to make it more personal Smile
Love everything about this gun.
Looking forward not only to keep it in a nightstand but also to take it out to the range once in a while to keep it “alive”
 
Posts: 22 | Registered: July 27, 2020Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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nice score !
 
Posts: 39 | Location: pennsylvainia | Registered: July 05, 2020Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Oriental Redneck
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Very nice classic SIG. But, I can guarantee you that is not stainless steel. There has never been a stainless W. German SIG **.

** Edit: I was focusing mainly on the classic folded slide SIGs (P220, 225, 226, 228, 245), when I made that statement. However, the statement as it applies to all SIG pistols is incorrect. Member 220parts pointed out to me that SIG did make the P230 SL in all stainless in W. Germany, a fact that I completely overlooked. Thanks, TJ, for the tip. Cool

This message has been edited. Last edited by: 12131,
 
Posts: 19985 | Location: TEXAS | Registered: September 04, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Nice Sig, but that's nickel
 
Posts: 19985 | Registered: June 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Oriental Redneck
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quote:
Originally posted by jimmy123x:
...that's nickel

Ya sure?
 
Posts: 19985 | Location: TEXAS | Registered: September 04, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I’m not a metallurgist but to me it almost feels more like a raw aluminium.
I’ve been doing online research about these classic pistols and can only find references to the nickel models of that time and bare stainless steel ones.
Nickel models are supposed to have everything plated including the hardware which is not the case here
Stainless usually has a slightly different hue
There isn’t a single tiny rust spot on this gun and in south Texas climate even stainless steel rusts Smile
Can some body please weigh their classic Sig without a magazine so I can compare it against mine?
 
Posts: 22 | Registered: July 27, 2020Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I picked up a W German P226 in 2013 that went back to SIG for refurbishing. It was when Top Gun Supply was getting a lot of CPO guns...and had a P226 on my wishlist. LOL Well got it for $6579 if not mistaken...great weapon...accurate, solid, reliable. Not sure what all was done in factory but was completely refinished for sure, new grips and looked like new spring on guide rod. That and my German made (1990s) P220 are two of my fav SIGs for feel, accuracy and just a joy to shoot.
Mine has the Kiel Proof House mark...along with the Eagle-N mark signifying proofed in Germany. Mine is also a KA for 1990.
Congrats on a good find....to me the DA/SA P series were/are the best of the SIGS.


 
Posts: 19 | Registered: July 16, 2020Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Oriental Redneck
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quote:
Originally posted by sip79:
I’m not a metallurgist but to me it almost feels more like a raw aluminium.
I’ve been doing online research about these classic pistols and can only find references to the nickel models of that time and bare stainless steel ones.

Can you point us to a credible source that says stainless W. German SIGs exist? Thanks.
Never mind. See my edited/corrected post above.

quote:
Nickel models are supposed to have everything plated including the hardware which is not the case here

The ones that were plated in W. Germany had everything plated. The ones that were plated in the US by Klein did not (the barrel, breech block, and locking insert were not plated).
quote:
Can some body please weigh their classic Sig without a magazine so I can compare it against mine?

Yours should weigh around 30 oz with an empty mag. An all stainless one should weigh around 40 oz w/ empty mag.

And, to my eye, your P226 looks like it has been refinished, maybe in Cerakote. Not original finish.

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Posts: 19985 | Location: TEXAS | Registered: September 04, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Oriental Redneck
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W. German KC (1992) factory Nickel P226



German BC (2012) all stainless P226
 
Posts: 19985 | Location: TEXAS | Registered: September 04, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Get Off My Lawn
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quote:
Originally posted by sip79:
I’ve been doing online research about these classic pistols...


...and you have an extremely knowledgeable man posting in response to your posts, Q (12131). He is one of the go-to guys for info on German Sigs.



"I’m not going to read Time Magazine, I’m not going to read Newsweek, I’m not going to read any of these magazines; I mean, because they have too much to lose by printing the truth"- Bob Dylan, 1965
 
Posts: 13201 | Location: Texas | Registered: May 13, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by sip79:
I’m not a metallurgist but to me it almost feels more like a raw aluminium.

Get a magnet. Does it stick to the trigger guard?

Remove the magazine and stick the magnet to the front strap beneath the trigger guard. Does it stick?

Remove the slide. Does the magnet stick to the dust cover in front of the trigger guard?

If 'no' to all the above, then you know the frame is refinished aluminum alloy and not steel.
 
Posts: 1857 | Location: Texas | Registered: June 17, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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thanks all for the comments. Yep. Mine is definitely not a steel judging by the weight of it.
It weighs in at 28.1 oz without a mag
 
Posts: 22 | Registered: July 27, 2020Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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this is a copy paste of a post by tigerbloodwinning from another forum I ran across:

"SIG Sauer factory finishes
My first ever post on ST was about trying to document some of the finishes used by SIG Sauer. This is a rewrite of that and I hope it is a useful reference for all of you. This is a huge topic and I try to keep it simple by not including special editions. I have also generally excluded Swiss P210's, 1911's, and most polymer-framed SIGs. Additions, corrections, and suggestions are always welcome.


1. Bluing: Bluing was used on the SIG Sauer guns that had a stamped carbon steel slide during their entire lifespan. On these guns, the slide, the removable breech block, and all small steel parts were blued, while the frames were black anodized aluminum.

2. Electroless Nickel: Electroless nickel (EN) was available as an option on a number of SIG Sauers. The first guns were the stamped carbon steel slide P-series models made in West Germany and later Germany. I know from 12131 that the first original factory nickel SIGs were done in West Germany. Everything on these guns was nickeled except for the plastic parts and the springs. Even the roll pins were nickeled. There is a letter of confirmation/authenticity from a thread started by TerminalSigness on 11/12/2019 for one of these guns. It says that the nickel plating was done by SIG Sauer themselves in West Germany. The paper also states that they would no longer be plating their guns in-house and that plating henceforth would be done in the United States. This is consistent with the well-known fact that all factory nickel SIGs after this time were done by Klein plating in Erie, PA. The guns sent to Klein were already completed blued guns (see #1 above) and so Klein had to strip the finish from the slide and/or the frame to apply the nickel. Full-nickel (Ni) stamped carbon steel slide guns had the slide, frame, controls, and other exterior-visible small parts finished in nickel. The breech block assembly, barrel, locking insert, and several other internal parts remained blued. Two-tone nickel (TTNi) stamped carbon steel slide guns had nickel slides, and black anodized aluminum frames, with blued small parts and controls. The controls of these guns were also finished in nickel for later model years. The only factory nickel West German and German SIGs are either from Klein or from SIG themselves. US-made or partially US-made SIGs have their own story. A rare few were available with electroless nickel. All TTNi versions I have seen of these guns had nickeled controls. I don't know for sure if Klein did these particular guns but presumably they did. All factory nickel SIGs were done in electroless nickel. Nickel electroplating was never used.

3. K-Kote: K-Kote was offered on the stamped carbon steel slide P-series guns. It was only offered on those guns. There are allegedly two versions of the K-Kote. The first version was one of the two alternatives to bluing on the early stamped slide guns. The other was electroless nickel (see #2 above). This first K-Kote version has a dark, deep, and glossy look when compared to standard bluing. The slide was already blued before the K-Kote was applied. This is evident when looking at the inside surface of the slide. The K-Kote was only applied to the outside surface of the slide because the finish itself has a considerable thickness. The finish was never applied to the frame. The removable breech block and small steel parts of these K-Kote guns were blued while the frame was black anodized aluminum. I am not sure how long this finish was available. It was usually an option when ordering a SIG back in the '80s and '90s and occasionally it was possible to find one in stock at a store. Nevertheless, it is much rarer than bluing. I learned from a conversation with 12131 that there is a second version of the K-Kote finish. It is matte and grainy in its appearance and it can only be found (as far as 12131 and I know) on the M11B guns. It is only on the slide just like in the previous version. The main difference this time is that it is on the inside of the slide and not just the outside. This would indicate that it is also dimensionally thinner than the original version of K-Kote.

4. Nitron: Nitron is believed to be Ionbond's DLC (diamond-like carbon) finish and it has been available on milled stainless slide SIG Sauers since the 1990s. Today it is used on the standard versions of P-series guns that have black anodized aluminum frames and also on the all-stainless US-made P210. Nitron is also found on the slides of the polymer-framed SIGs. It is actually the most commonly used finish on modern SIG Sauers. If your SIG’s slide is black, milled, and unmodified, then you probably have a Nitron. The finish can also be applied to carbon steel as well. The German-made SIG Sauer P210 Legend is an example. It has a carbon steel slide and frame which are both finished in Nitron.

5. Ilaflon: Ilaflon is a finish used on later German-made guns. It has been available on stamped carbon steel slide guns as well as German-made milled stainless slide guns. It is similar in appearance and texture to the old K-Kote but I have no idea what it is made of or how it is applied. I used to think Ilaflon was only black. But I learned from bearone2 that it is also available in different colors. The blue and green hues of the German X5 and X6 guns are Ilaflon. Searching the web will yield a link to a Swiss company called ILAG. The Ilaflon finish is detailed on their website. Its uses and description make it seem like the "flon" in the name suggests a composition similar to Teflon. I'm not sure if this is the same Ilaflon as what is on some of our German SIGs. But it likely is because the name "Ilaflon" seems to be a registered trademark. This finish is not and never was available on any US-made SIG. Most people maintain that it is because Ilafon's byproducts are a no-go with the EPA. But I don't know if this was confirmed. I also don't know all of the models where it was used.

6. "Natural" Stainless: "Natural" stainless isn't really a finish. SIG Sauers made in Germany and in the US have variants with stainless steel frames or stainless steel slides or both. When they are silver in color, it means that the stainless steel is bare and is only bead blasted for a matte appearance. No finish is applied to the surface. The only exception that I can think of is the early US-made SIGs that had electroless nickel finishes. These guns are easy to identify because their color has a characteristic gold tint which indicates the presence of a finish. In contrast, the stainless steel alloy that is used/made by SIG is completely silver, without any noticeable gold tint.

7. PVD: PVD stands for physical vapor deposition. The gray finish on all but the most recent Legion models is a PVD. The people over at MMBI told me that many of the German SIGs currently being imported by them have a PVD finish. For example, the P226 AL SO sold by them has a black PVD finish on the slide and a black anodized aluminum frame. The all-stainless P226 SL SO BT has a black PVD finish on the slide and frame. Nitron also falls under the PVD category because "PVD" refers to the method of application rather than the specific type of finish. Nitron is carbon-based which is seemingly the toughest PVD and also seemingly the easiest way for SIG to achieve a black color on stainless steel. So it is possible that the MMBI-imported SIGs described as having a "black PVD finish" are actually Nitron. But this is not confirmed. Other (usually metallic-colored) PVD coatings are metal-based. I learned from Just Plain Cliff that the silver German P210 has a DLC finish. This is noteworthy because it is a PVD that isn't metal-based, yet has a metallic color. One would expect the carbon in DLC to be responsible for making the gun black, and until seeing the silver German P210, I had never seen a non-black DLC finish.

8. Cerakote: Cerakote is a ceramic-based coating applied to certain US-made SIG Sauers for when certain colors other than black and silver are desired. SIGs coming from the factory with Cerakote include the tan, green, and blue finishes of the M11-A1. I believe the tan version of the P226 MK25 is also a Cerakote finish. Apparently the newest Legions are switching from PVD to Cerakote.

9. Anodizing: All of the black aluminum frames of SIG Sauer guns are anodized as far as I know. The colored ones are either Cerakote or PVD."
 
Posts: 22 | Registered: July 27, 2020Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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so could it be that my gun is what referred to in that post as a PVD finish?





 
Posts: 22 | Registered: July 27, 2020Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Unflappable Enginerd
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so could it be that my gun is what referred to in that post as a PVD finish?
As noted, that gun looks like it started life as a factory blue, and was subsequently refinished with something like Cerakote. I say that because of the "shallowness" of the roll marks.

Also, what is stamped on the left side of that barrel? OWJ *S KY ??


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Posts: 4413 | Location: Headland, AL | Registered: April 19, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Also, what is stamped on the left side of that barrel? OWJ *S KY ??


I think it says DWJ GS KY (or KV)
 
Posts: 22 | Registered: July 27, 2020Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Oriental Redneck
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PVD is not a finish. It is a process. Whatever process that was used that results in that finish on your gun, whatever it is, we'll likely never know.

Btw, that rollmark on the barrel is the import marking. DWJ GG KY = DWJ Imports Glasgow KY.
https://www.dwjimports.com/ind...ion&information_id=4

Contrary to common belief, importer rollmark doesn't have to be on the frame or the slide only. It can be on the barrel, also, per ATF rules/regulations.
 
Posts: 19985 | Location: TEXAS | Registered: September 04, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I've never seen those markings on a SIG barrel before. I think a trip to NH for the SSP and then some CCR love would be a good idea.
 
Posts: 1785 | Location: San Diego, CA | Registered: July 02, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks again!
Is it worth to refinish it one more time to make it look a little better? Not sure if some of the nicks can be removed
It is absolutely perfect mechanically so I’m just considering it aesthetic wise.
What are the options to get it “restored” to a nicer condition? What are the recommended/reputable places to do it (and a ballpark associated cost)?
 
Posts: 22 | Registered: July 27, 2020Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Oriental Redneck
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quote:
Originally posted by sip79:
Sorry, not too familiar with these abbreviations yet Smile
Would you please elaborate what is SSP and CCR?


https://www.sigsauer.com/custom-shop/

SIG SAUER now offers a special service for used SIG SAUER pistols called the SIG Service Plan (SSP). When you buy a used pistol, whether it’s from a shooting buddy, a retail store or at a gun show, contact SIG SAUER Customer Service for shipping instructions. Then, ship your pistol to the factory for a complete cleaning and our “full service package” for just $144.95. This special offer includes installation of new SIGLITE Night Sights* – a $120 value. Our expert armorers will inspect your pistol top to bottom. Should your pistol show signs of misuse or damage caused by a previous owner, SIG SAUER’s armorers will advise you and offer cost-effective solutions to repair your pistol.

The SIG Service Plan includes*:

-Full disassembly of pistols down to frame and slide
-Complete detailed cleaning
-Expert factory inspection of all critical components
-Replacement of springs (recoil, slide catch lever, trigger bar, decocking lever)
-Reassembly and lubrication to factory specifications
-Installation of SIGLITE Factory Night Sights (excluding P232)
-Function test
-This service, valued at $225, is yours for just $144.95 and brings your used SIG SAUER pistol back to peak operational readiness.


This is CCR. <<<
 
Posts: 19985 | Location: TEXAS | Registered: September 04, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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