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is there one bullet configuration for rifles ? Login/Join 
Member
Picture of bendable
posted
that is hands down the answer to all accuracy questions?


for 7.62 x 39 ammo, .223, .243 winchester , or 7.62 x 54 ammo.

is it h.p.b.t. is that ! the magic bullet for most calibers,
is it the most consistent ?
is it the "go to " when purchasing factory ammo?





Safety, Situational Awareness and proficiency.



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Posts: 44504 | Location: Henry County , Il | Registered: February 10, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Freethinker
Picture of sigfreund
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People who are more expert than I will chime in, but for starters it’s not only its configuration that makes an accurate bullet. There are other factors that affect accuracy.

That said, it’s claimed there are several advantages to the open tip design. One is that the center of gravity is moved to the rear somewhat because most open tip bullet cores don’t extend to the tip of the bullet; there’s usually an airspace there. Another is that it’s difficult to manufacture bullets whose cores do extend to the tip, and also difficult to manufacture consistent pointed jackets that completely cover the tip. Something like a pointed soft tip bullet avoids the jacket problem, but not the center of gravity issue, plus exposed lead pointed tips are easily damaged, and the more pointed the easier.

Sharply pointed bullets like most of those with small open tips have higher ballistic coefficients than typical soft points designed for hunting. Some soft points like Speer’s Gold Dots in 223 Remington and 308 Winchester extend the jacket all the way to the edges of the tip, but they’re still not as sharp as most OT designs. One issue with OT bullets is that their meplats (tips) are often somewhat uneven. There’s even a tool available to trim them up. Whether that makes any difference in practice I don’t know, but ….

Some manufacturers like Hornady these days are producing match grade bullets with plastic tips. They’re not really new because Nosler developed the Ballistic Tip line decades ago, but the idea that plastic-tipped bullets could be used for match purposes is more recent. The advantage of plastic tips is that they’re less susceptible to damage and can be made very sharp to maximize ballistic coefficient. In addition, plastic tips can be set into bullets with a fairly large opening in the jacket, and that enhances expansion if the bullet is used for something other than ringing steel or punching paper. In 308 Winchester, for example, I find that Hornady’s TAP line produces virtually the same accuracy as Federal’s 168 and 175 grain Gold Medal Match loads that use Sierra OT bullets—at least with my rifles and skills.




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Posts: 36994 | Location: 10,150 Feet Above Sea Level in Colorado | Registered: April 04, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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coffee, and sarcasm.
Picture of egregore
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The "match" rifle bullets I'm aware of are HP. With FMJ and soft point, the jacket is wrapped around the core nose first and rolled around the edges of the tail, leaving the lead base exposed. Any little variation in the hardness/softness of the exposed lead, the contours of the jacket crimping, etc., however tiny, can push the bullet slightly off course as it exits the muzzle. HP bullets are wrapped around tail first, leaving a smooth bullet base that is the same for every bullet. Less variation = more accuracy.


 
Posts: 19024 | Location: Johnson City/Elizabethton, TN | Registered: April 28, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of bendable
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I realize that accuracy is dependent on a half a dozen factors.

I am just wondering if there is one bullet configuration that is a "constant" , from one caliber to another





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Neck Ties, Hats and ammo brass, Never ,ever touch'em w/o asking first
 
Posts: 44504 | Location: Henry County , Il | Registered: February 10, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
fugitive from reality
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The HPBT is the most common type of bullet used in match grade centerfire ammunition.


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Posts: 5212 | Location: Newyorkistan | Registered: March 28, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
I started with nothing,
and still have most of it
Picture of stiab
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quote:
Originally posted by sigfreund:
They’re not really new because Nosler developed the Ballistic Tip line decades ago...

And Remington had their Bronze Points long before that. I have some that predates the child safety warning, which makes them over 50 years old. Unlike Winchester's Silver Tips, Bronze Points are a true ballistic tip ammo.


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Posts: 1431 | Location: Central NC | Registered: May 18, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Hollow point, boat-tail rifle bullets are not generally about expansion, but ballistic coefficient and trajectory.
At 3,000 fps, a FMJ 55 grain 5.56mm round will inflict horrific damage inside 100 meters...it absolutely does NOT need a special construction to make it happen.

With the pedestrian 7.62x39 the same is not true. The rather heavy for caliber bullet benefits from a soft-point nose configuration that will result in explosive results on impact.

For 7.5" barrel AR-15's a specialized load does become preferred and in this case a 40 grain Vmax, or 36 grain Barnes pushing 2,700+ fps. These bullets will explode on impact - even with humans, yet due to their velocity, the damage is transmitted well beyond 7-8" inside which is all that is needed to put a human down when over 1,000 lb-ft of KE is completely expended into the host tissue.

I would invite ANYONE who thinks a frangible bullet from the 5.56 will not do enough to stop a human to step in front of one and take the hit just to PROVE the round is seriously anemic. So far NOBODY has taken the offer. There is a reason very FEW people are admitted to hospital emergency rooms with 5.56mm "wounds"...the REASON is because they are DEAD and on the way to the morgue!
 
Posts: 30 | Registered: July 24, 2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Experienced Slacker
Picture of apprentice
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If you made me choose one thing about a bullet's construction that would indicate accuracy it would be the base. The flatter the better.

Flat base bullets have always made tighter groups for me than boat tails when all else is equal. Often by a significant margin.

This was explained to me, at some point in the distant past, that how a bullet leaves the muzzle is the deciding factor in what direction the bullet heads off in. The flat base design tends to exit with less wobble apparently.

All I know is that my experience shows a consistent pattern of this being true.

I can't speak to extreme long range shooting, that is a different ball game. Under 200 yards is my whole world around here, so I've little personal need for info at further distances.


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Posts: 5659 | Location: North Idaho | Registered: May 12, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of chansen92
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quote:
Originally posted by apprentice:
If you made me choose one thing about a bullet's construction that would indicate accuracy it would be the base. The flatter the better.

Flat base bullets have always made tighter groups for me than boat tails when all else is equal. Often by a significant margin.

This was explained to me, at some point in the distant past, that how a bullet leaves the muzzle is the deciding factor in what direction the bullet heads off in. The flat base design tends to exit with less wobble apparently.

All I know is that my experience shows a consistent pattern of this being true.

I can't speak to extreme long range shooting, that is a different ball game. Under 200 yards is my whole world around here, so I've little personal need for info at further distances.
I very much think you are right with your answer. I'm limited to 300-500 yrds and I get very good accuracy with flat based bullets. I think heavy boat tail bullets are more stable at the longer distant on windy days but lets be honest here; I can't shoot good enough with the equipment I have to tell much difference over 300 yrds so I shoot what I have one hand and don't worry about it. Wink
 
Posts: 1570 | Location: owosso,Mi. USA | Registered: August 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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