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The wound damage from an M4 bullet. Login/Join 
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The shockwave from the .556 is enough to break the femur without hitting it, although not in this case.



For some reason, Islamists are the only racist, sexist, homophobic theocrats the media can't summon outrage against.
 
Posts: 801 | Location: Surrounded by Mountains | Registered: August 27, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Graphic yes. But much worse if you see it in person. A good lesson on the damage a round can do to a human being, (hopefully not yourself).
 
Posts: 6737 | Location: MS GULF COAST | Registered: January 02, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Freethinker
Picture of sigfreund
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From the article linked in the first post:
“[T]he casualty was hit by a single M4 round from a range of approximately 150 meters.”

Based on Internet research and data from the Applied Ballistics solver, at 150 meters under “standard” atmospheric conditions the velocity of the 62 grain M855 bullet would be about 2440 feet per second, a loss of almost 500 fps as compared to the muzzle velocity from the M4 carbine. Although velocity is critical to the wounding effects of the 5.56mm cartridge, it doesn’t require shooting at bad breath distances.




“Most men … can seldom accept the simplest and most obvious truth if it … would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions … which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabrics of their lives.”
— Leo Tolstoy
 
Posts: 40496 | Location: 10,150 Feet Above Sea Level in Colorado | Registered: April 04, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Savor the limelight
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Interesting article. I've taken a few deer and two in particular illustrate the difference between slow, heavy bullets and fast, light ones.

I shot one deer with at 40 yards with a 325 grain .45 cal Hornady Leverolution 45-70 and the bullet went straight through. The entry and exit were about the same size, there was a clean hole through both lungs, and the top part of the heart. The deer ran 90 yards into the woods.

The next deer was the same size as the first. I shot it with 140 grain 7mm Rem. Mag. Core Lokt at 120 yards. It had an entrance wound, but no exit wound. It had nothing indentifiable as lungs, just runny mush. The deer didn't take another step.

Looking at the pictures in the article, it would seem 5.56 would be effective on deer as well.
 
Posts: 5171 | Location: SWFL | Registered: October 10, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Non-Miscreant
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quote:
Originally posted by highroundcount:
or the catheter stuck up his dick hole?


Doesn't even need answering. He was clearly under some good drugs. He felt neither.

My experience with catheters is that they're a joy. You don't need to get up to take a leak every couple of hours. You don't need to go at all, it just runs out. After surgery, the painful part is the nurse ripping it out. I'd guess some nurses are better at it than others, with mine being one of the poorer ones. The wound healing is another story.


Unhappy ammo seeker
 
Posts: 16645 | Location: Kentucky, USA | Registered: February 25, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
fugitive from reality
Picture of SgtGold
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quote:
Originally posted by sigfreund:
From the article linked in the first post:
“[T]he casualty was hit by a single M4 round from a range of approximately 150 meters.”

Based on Internet research and data from the Applied Ballistics solver, at 150 meters under “standard” atmospheric conditions the velocity of the 62 grain M855 bullet would be about 2440 feet per second, a loss of almost 500 fps as compared to the muzzle velocity from the M4 carbine. Although velocity is critical to the wounding effects of the 5.56mm cartridge, it doesn’t require shooting at bad breath distances.


A lot of the data I've read points towards 160 meters being generally accepted as the maximum fragmentation threshold for the M4 carbine. I did run across two negligent discharge cases where an individual was hit at bad breath distance, and neither wound was as severe as the one in this thread. One soldier was shot in the temple, with the bullet passing through his skull and exiting out the other side. He lost his vision, but survived. The other was a troop who shot himself in the upper thigh, with the bullet exiting near, but missing the knee. He walked to the medic station and had light duty for a little while until the puncture wounds healed.

Edited for speling.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: SgtGold,


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Posts: 6393 | Location: Newyorkistan | Registered: March 28, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Freethinker
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Thanks for mentioning the above incidents. They, plus the one described at the beginning of this thread, demonstrate the importance of adequate statistical data. A sample of one or two shows what can happen—but not what will always happen, or even what is likely to happen. This is especially true of complex phenomena like gunshot wounds. They involve many highly variable elements that will almost never be exactly the same among incidents.

Even when all the variables seem to have been minimized, things don’t always turn out the same. I once observed a factory-sponsored demonstration of the Hornady 9mm 115 grain Critical Duty load. Everything was as identical as possible: the same block of properly-calibrated “ordnance” gelatin, the same gun, the same shooting distance, the same box of ammunition. The first bullet failed to expand, perforated 16 inches of the test medium, and bounced off the backstop. The second shot expanded to a picture perfect mushroom with the so-called ideal penetration depth. Which one will get featured in the company’s advertising? Hmm …?




“Most men … can seldom accept the simplest and most obvious truth if it … would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions … which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabrics of their lives.”
— Leo Tolstoy
 
Posts: 40496 | Location: 10,150 Feet Above Sea Level in Colorado | Registered: April 04, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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