SIGforum.com    Main Page  Hop To Forum Categories  Classifieds Section    $99 Gun Trusts
Page 1 2 3 4 5 ... 24
Go
New
Find
Notify
Tools
Reply
  
$99 Gun Trusts Login/Join 
Member
Picture of triage1998
posted Hide Post
I hope to be using your services real soon Cool



Kevin Nightingale
Nightingale Leather
Maker of Quality Handmade Holsters



https://nightingaleleather.com/


 
Posts: 1014 | Location: Medina, Ohio | Registered: January 21, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Dean of Law
Picture of heavyd
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by AUTiger89:
Dean,

I just read over your web site, but I don't know much about trusts.

Can you explain what the purpose of an NFA Trust is, and how I would benefit from having one?


The benefits of a Trust for registering NFA weapons are as follows:

- Anyone you list as a co-trustee can possess the NFA weapons. This can be family members, friends, anyone you want. If you register as an individual only you can possess the NFA weapons. This could be problematic if someone lives with you.

- The only way you can apply for a tax stamp online is with a gun trust. Approval time for Form 1 is taking about 30 days or less. If filed as an individual it can take up to 9 months.

- You do not have to get a sheriff sign off, submit fingerprints, or submit a photo ID. If filed as an individual you must do so for every tax stamp. A big problem is some sheriffs won't sign off.

- When you pass away the NFA weapons go straight to your beneficiaries tax free. The weapons do not go through probate court like the rest of your estate that is not in a trust.

- I have seen a couple clients have their parent's NFA weapons taken by law enforcement until the estate is probated (no trust).

- Lastly, I will teach you how to get in the NFA game. We will walk you through your first tax stamp to show you how to get approved. I make myself very available to clients.


Benefit for non-NFA weapons:

- You can put your entire gun collection in your trust if you wish. Doing so will prevent your gun collection from going through probate court. This is particularly important for those who prefer their weapons stay undocumented.


H. Dean Phillips
$99 Gun Trusts
NFAlawyers.com
 
Posts: 6313 | Location: Georgia | Registered: December 02, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of 98XJRC
posted Hide Post
Dean maybe you can clear a few things up for me. Currently I have a SBR registered in my name. If I were to place it in a trust I would need to get it engraved again or just start fresh with a new lower. I would also be paying the $200 tax stamp again. My next question is that while still young I want my children to be able to use and have in their possession any items registered. Would I be better off setting them up as co-trustees or as beneficiary. They are all under 18 at this time.
 
Posts: 517 | Location: PA  | Registered: December 05, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
A Grateful American
Picture of sigmonkey
posted Hide Post
Couple of questions.
Normally I will research on my own, but since it is legal questions, I would rather ask.

I hope this in not bad form.


-Selling guns that are in the trust, (non-NFA items).

-Can you add or remove someone from the trust and how do you do so.

-If a spouse is not listed and there is a divorce, how is that factored for community assets issues?

-If someone is on the trust, but the firearms were not purchased by them, nor possessed by them, can they demand possession, sale or otherwise make someone's life miserable? (say I buy a gun, put it in a trust have a friend in the trust, can they do anything adverse, where nothing could be done otherwise?)

Are there any downsides to a trust?

I like the benefits listed here and will do this today as long as I am not putting a potential buzz killer in my life.

Thanks for the opportunity and information.




"the meaning of life, is to give life meaning" I could explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.
 
Posts: 33953 | Location: My Happy Little Tire Swing | Registered: December 20, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Pistolria
posted Hide Post
I have a NFA trust done through Quicken Willmaker. What would be involved in having the current trust moved over to one created by you?

Thanks in advance!
 
Posts: 460 | Location: Jacksonville Beach, FL | Registered: July 24, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
cigar smoking 11b4
Picture of goatboyz
posted Hide Post
I've been contemplating this for some time. This was the push to get me over the edge… Thanks!


‎"I have a high art; I hurt with cruelty those who would damage me."
-- Archilocus, 650 B.C.
 
Posts: 1160 | Location: Behind the cheddar curtain. | Registered: July 17, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
cigar smoking 11b4
Picture of goatboyz
posted Hide Post
Form submitted!!!


‎"I have a high art; I hurt with cruelty those who would damage me."
-- Archilocus, 650 B.C.
 
Posts: 1160 | Location: Behind the cheddar curtain. | Registered: July 17, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Truckin' On
Picture of AH.74
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by heavyd:
Benefit for non-NFA weapons:

- You can put your entire gun collection in your trust if you wish. Doing so will prevent your gun collection from going through probate court. This is particularly important for those who prefer their weapons stay undocumented.


Wondering if you may take a moment to explain how this is done- IOW, how do you go about "putting" the gun/s into the trust?


____________
Μολὼν Λαβέ
01 03 04 14
 
Posts: 6861 | Registered: November 14, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Dean of Law
Picture of heavyd
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by 98XJRC:
Dean maybe you can clear a few things up for me. Currently I have a SBR registered in my name. If I were to place it in a trust I would need to get it engraved again or just start fresh with a new lower. I would also be paying the $200 tax stamp again.


That is correct.

quote:
Originally posted by 98XJRC:
My next question is that while still young I want my children to be able to use and have in their possession any items registered. Would I be better off setting them up as co-trustees or as beneficiary. They are all under 18 at this time.


You would set your children up as co-trustees so they have the power to use and possess the trust property (NFA weapons in the trust). You can list minors as co-trustees. However, the minors would not be able to possess the NFA weapons until they are at least 18 years of age and lawfully able to possess a firearm.


H. Dean Phillips
$99 Gun Trusts
NFAlawyers.com
 
Posts: 6313 | Location: Georgia | Registered: December 02, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
cigar smoking 11b4
Picture of goatboyz
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by AH.74:
quote:
Originally posted by heavyd:
Benefit for non-NFA weapons:

- You can put your entire gun collection in your trust if you wish. Doing so will prevent your gun collection from going through probate court. This is particularly important for those who prefer their weapons stay undocumented.


Wondering if you may take a moment to explain how this is done- IOW, how do you go about "putting" the gun/s into the trust?


+1

Does the trust get listed on the 4473?


‎"I have a high art; I hurt with cruelty those who would damage me."
-- Archilocus, 650 B.C.
 
Posts: 1160 | Location: Behind the cheddar curtain. | Registered: July 17, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Dean of Law
Picture of heavyd
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Pistolria:
I have a NFA trust done through Quicken Willmaker. What would be involved in having the current trust moved over to one created by you?

Thanks in advance!


Good question. You would need to Form 4 everything to the new trust. Unfortunately, this requires the $200 tax stamp.


H. Dean Phillips
$99 Gun Trusts
NFAlawyers.com
 
Posts: 6313 | Location: Georgia | Registered: December 02, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Rock Paper
Scissors
Lizard Spock
Picture of James in Denver
posted Hide Post
This shows you how good SigForum is.

I paid WAY FREAKING MORE for a Gun Trust by a "well known" gun trust lawyer. While helpful, if I were to do it again, I'd jump on this.

ARGH!!!!

And to top it off, I don't even have any NFA items yet, I just moved my "hi-cap" mags to the trust due to the Colorado laws.

James in Denver


----------------------------
Robert Heinlein – Starship Troopers – Chapter 2
“Violence, naked force has settled more issues in history than has any other factor. And the contrary opinion is wishful thinking at its worst.
Breeds that forget this basic truth have always paid for it with their lives … and freedoms.”
 
Posts: 4050 | Location: Colorado | Registered: August 24, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Dean of Law
Picture of heavyd
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by goatboyz:

Does the trust get listed on the 4473?


The Settlor (primary trustee in my trust) who signs for the NFA weapon fills out the 4473 with their name "as trustee".


H. Dean Phillips
$99 Gun Trusts
NFAlawyers.com
 
Posts: 6313 | Location: Georgia | Registered: December 02, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Dean of Law
Picture of heavyd
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by AH.74:
quote:
Originally posted by heavyd:
Benefit for non-NFA weapons:

- You can put your entire gun collection in your trust if you wish. Doing so will prevent your gun collection from going through probate court. This is particularly important for those who prefer their weapons stay undocumented.


Wondering if you may take a moment to explain how this is done- IOW, how do you go about "putting" the gun/s into the trust?


Hey AH,

On my trust property is added via the Schedule A. I give my clients a word document of the Schedule A so they can type in or delete items from the trust whenever they wish.

Get a new gun you want in the trust:
- Pull up the word document
- Type in the Make, Model, Serial Number
- Sign with 2 witnesses


H. Dean Phillips
$99 Gun Trusts
NFAlawyers.com
 
Posts: 6313 | Location: Georgia | Registered: December 02, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Dean of Law
Picture of heavyd
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by sigmonkey:
Are there any downsides to a trust?

I like the benefits listed here and will do this today as long as I am not putting a potential buzz killer in my life.

Thanks for the opportunity and information.


The only downside is it costs $125 Razz

You can add or delete co-trustees, beneficiaries, and change the address. It requires a separate legal document. We charge $25 for simple modifications.

The primary trustee has control providing you the most protection.


H. Dean Phillips
$99 Gun Trusts
NFAlawyers.com
 
Posts: 6313 | Location: Georgia | Registered: December 02, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Truckin' On
Picture of AH.74
posted Hide Post
Thanks, heavyd. Appreciate the info, and I'm definitely giving this strong consideration.


____________
Μολὼν Λαβέ
01 03 04 14
 
Posts: 6861 | Registered: November 14, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
cigar smoking 11b4
Picture of goatboyz
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by heavyd:
quote:
Originally posted by goatboyz:

Does the trust get listed on the 4473?


The Settlor (primary trustee in my trust) who signs for the NFA weapon fills out the 4473 with their name "as trustee".


I think I understand… Might be giving you a call before I actually try to purchase the first firearm…


‎"I have a high art; I hurt with cruelty those who would damage me."
-- Archilocus, 650 B.C.
 
Posts: 1160 | Location: Behind the cheddar curtain. | Registered: July 17, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of JWF
posted Hide Post
Could I name my brother (out of state) as a co-trustee so he could get my handguns without going to an FFL on my demise?


If you are not prepared to use force to defend civilization, then be prepared to accept barbarism. —Thomas Sowell

NRA
Georgia Carry
 
Posts: 836 | Location: NW GA | Registered: September 08, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Dean of Law
Picture of heavyd
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by JWF:
Could I name my brother (out of state) as a co-trustee so he could get my handguns without going to an FFL on my demise?


You would name your brother as a beneficiary. If you would like for him to be able to possess your trust property then name him as a co-trustee as well.


H. Dean Phillips
$99 Gun Trusts
NFAlawyers.com
 
Posts: 6313 | Location: Georgia | Registered: December 02, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of downtownv
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by AUTiger89:

Can you explain what the purpose of an NFA Trust is, and how I would benefit from having one?


Hope this helps:
What is a NFA Trust or Gun Trust?
July 17, 2012
Posted In: FAQ's
By David M. Goldman on July 17, 2012 11:35 AM | Permalink
WHAT IS AN NFA GUN TRUST?
NFA firearms (also called NFA weapons) are certain guns and accessories regulated by the National Firearms Act. They are sometimes incorrectly called "Class 3 weapons." The confusion over the Class 3 terms is related to the licence that is required for a dealer to possess to sell Title II Firearms. NFA firearms include all fully automatic and select fire weapons, short-barreled rifles and shotguns and sound suppressors (silencers). NFA firearms include things that you might not expect.
Example: Remember the Hi-Standard .22 Derringer It is an ordinary "garden variety" pistol. Pair it with a wallet holster and it becomes an NFA weapon. Many collectibles, including pistols with detachable shoulder stocks, such as the Artillery Luger and the "Broomhandle" Mauser are also regulated by the National Firearms Act.
Suppose that your father brought home a "deactivated" machine gun from World War II? Even though these "Deactivated War Trophies" are welded up and are incapable of firing, they are still NFA weapons.
broom.jpg
You can lawfully own NFA firearms, as long as they are permitted under state law. You have to register them with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives ("BATFE") and pay a $200 tax on each one. Unless you acquire them through a trust or other entity, you have to obtain the consent of your chief of police. If you create a special type of trust, no local approval is required. These trusts have other significant advantages as well.
An NFA Gun Trust, sometimes called a "Gun Trust" or a "Class 3 Trust" is a type of revocable trust that you create specifically to acquire NFA weapons and to hold your other firearms. It differs substantially from an "ordinary" revocable trust.
An NFA Gun Trust makes it easier and more private to transfer not only NFA firearms, but any guns, to your family members if you die or become disabled. Assets in a trust pass directly to your beneficiaries outside of the probate system. There is no public record of what you own.
An NFA Gun trust can be an irrevocable or revocable, but an "ordinary" estate planning trusts should not be used to acquire and hold NFA firearms. NFA trusts must have special provisions that deal with firearms.
Example: You want your twelve-year-old child to someday inherit your gun collection, including NFA weapons. An NFA trust provides a way to lawfully store them until your child is old enough to have them transferred to him or her.
We have lawyers in every state that we work with who have modified our trusts for your state's specific law. The local attorneys deal with state trust and firearms issues and we are here to support you with the federal issues and the NFA.
Our NFA trusts contain language which deals with unique provisions of each state's law. In addition to the Gun Trust documents, we provide you with detailed, plain English instructions showing you how to fund the trust, acquire NFA weapons as a trustee and administer the trust.
WHY DO I NEED AN NFA TRUST?
No Signature Required
In order for an individual to lawfully acquire an NFA weapon, his or her CLEO - police chief or first selectman must sign a form called a "BATFE Form 4." Many CLEO's are reluctant, or refuse, to sign the form either for political reasons or concern about potential liability. If your chief refuses to sign, and you do not have an NFA trust, you will not be allowed to purchase any NFA weapons.

Avoiding Confiscation and Criminal Liability
Ordinary revocable trusts do not give the trustee the powers needed in order to deal with NFA weapons and with BATFE. Before distributing any NFA Item, the trustee must be sure that your beneficiary is not a "disqualified person" under State and Federal law. He or she must also determine which laws apply, including statutes in your beneficiary's home state.
Penalties for violating the National Firearms Act can be severe
Forfeiting the weapons is only the beginning. Individuals who run afoul of the NFA can be subjected to fines of up to $250,000 and 10 years in prison. An ordinary revocable trust does not give the trustee any instructions on dealing with firearms. An NFA trust provides the trustee with a "roadmap" to help him or her and your beneficiaries stay out of trouble.
Privacy
If you die or become disabled, your firearms will be part of your "probate estate." A Probate Court proceeding will be required to deal with your guns. Any member of the public can find out about the items in your collection and who will receive them.
Some people have used Corporations and LLCs to acquire NFA Firearms
Corporations and LLCs must pay ongoing fees and need to file tax returns. Trust offer significant advantages over corporations and LLCs, which are primarily intended to be "business entities" and are subject to annual fee and tax return requirements. After you have signed your NFA trust, there are no additional fees. No tax returns are required. Unlike a corporation or a LLC, a trust is a totally private arrangement. Other than BATFE and, only you and your designated successor trustees and beneficiaries will have any information about the trust assets.
Spouse and Children as "Registered Owners"
An NFA firearm can never be handled or transported by anyone other than the registered owner. NFA firearms owned by trusts may be lawfully purchased, possessed, and used by any trustee or "manager" of the trust.
Example: You own a machine gun as trustee of your NFA trust. You, your spouse, and your adult child are all trustees of the trust. Any of you may use and transport the weapon without the others present.


___________________________
My latest offering in Classified's

http://sigforum.com/eve/forums...250075214#4250075214
___________________________
http://sigforum.com/eve/forums...0601935/m/4270050614
 
Posts: 4018 | Location: 18 miles long, 6 Miles at Sea | Registered: January 22, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
  Powered by Social Strata Page 1 2 3 4 5 ... 24 
 

SIGforum.com    Main Page  Hop To Forum Categories  Classifieds Section    $99 Gun Trusts

© SIGforum 2017