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Picture of Ironbutt
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quote:
Originally posted by GrumpyBiker:
quote:
Originally posted by jhe888:
Grumpy Biker, I am glad those PM2s in jade an M4 are sold out. I already busted the knife budget and those were a sore temptation. Looks good.



I have been looking for a Hinderer but a “Friend” shot me the link when these were to drop.
I’d been wanting one so .... I guess I’m still searching for the Hinderer! LoL
This Hazard Pay we’re receiving is getting spent quickly !!! LoL

The grinds were the first thing to catch my eye. Finally a PM2 with a strong tip.





I have two of the regular PM2's in S30V & M390 & the only thing I don't like about them is the fragile tips, so I'm kinda carful about how I use them.

The Hinderers are another story. Those are hard use knives. I sold two Fattys last year because they were just overkill. I still have two 3.5" XM-18s & a Jurassic.



------------------------------------------------

"It's hard to imagine a more stupid or dangerous way of making decisions, than by putting those decisions in the hands of people who pay no price for being wrong."
Thomas Sowell
 
Posts: 1096 | Location: PA | Registered: September 01, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Northwoods Knives was founded by Dave Shirley and was a one man operation. Dave would have folks like Queen Cutlery make (SFO) knives for him to high standards and branded as Northwoods.

Dave Shirley sold the Northwoods brand to Knives Ship Free founder, Derrick Bohne, a decade or so ago. There were two conditions to the sale of Northwoods from Shirley to Bohne ... 1) that it remain a made-in-USA brand; and 2) that the knives continue to be high-quality tools.

The knives that Derrick Bohne had produced by Queen and GEC as special factory orders for Northwoods, are not only of high quality, but always in high demand and often sold out within hours of each Northwood's knife release.

Sadly, both Dave Shirley and Derrick Bohne have passed away. I have several Northwoods that Derrick Bohne released and they are among my favorites. But I also have three Northwoods that were released back when Dave Shirley was at the helm of Northwoods.

This Green Bone Slim Jack (D2 steel) is one Northwoods from Dave Shirley. It's unique to me in that it is the only green bone handled knife I have. It's long and very slim. I've relegated it to letter opening duties ... and maybe a string or package tape here and there.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Hobbs,
 
Posts: 4651 | Location: Bathing in the stream of consciousness ~~~ | Registered: July 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Hobbs:
quote:
Originally posted by Ogie:
Another funny thing: When I purchased my Buck 110 it was advertised to have a four inch blade. I never checked it until about a month ago. It's actually 3.75" in length. Go figure.

I thought the blade on the 110 was always 3 3/4". Buck does make a 4" blade but it's on a fixed blade Buck ... 103 Skinner I think.


Apparently my memory has failed me with the blade length. I can't find anywhere where the blade was four inches. Also, I thought I bought my Buck 110 in late 1979, or early 1980. According to the handy page that dates Buck knives, I purchased my knife in 1981. Two dots on each side of the "110". Thanks for the info!
 
Posts: 5870 | Location: Northwest Indiana | Registered: August 15, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Busier than a cat covering
crap on a marble floor
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While not totin' today, these two will eventually go to the two knife loving/collecting, outdoors loving grandsons!


________________________________________________________
Old Arizona saying: "A rattlesnake in the living room ends all discussion about animal rights."
 
Posts: 3266 | Location: AZ | Registered: July 18, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Festina Lente
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Just got a Hogue EX-01 with 4" tanto blade. Like this:



I'm liking it a lot. all the blade of my ZT 0566, at less weight...



NRA Life Member - "Fear God and Dreadnaught"
 
Posts: 8022 | Location: in the red zone of the blue state, CT | Registered: October 15, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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(LH) SEBENZA (31) Natural Canvas Micarta
It's a Zulu word meaning "work"
Don't know if they write or spell it "SEBENZA"
But that's how they say it
Like ... SEBENZA ... but with a Zulu accent
Not sure where they picked that up from though Wink



EDIT: Couple more of the small Work AKA SEBENZA Wink
... and a size comparison with an Ontario RAT II
Yes, I could get 12-13 (or more) of the RAT for what I paid for the SEBENZA but I'm left-handed and this SEBENZA is totally made for a lefty ... lock bar and all.
Rare to find a knife that is totally lefty. So there's that.
OH ... and the sheathed red knife in the pot? Victorinox Little Vicky. Most used paring knife in the house.



This message has been edited. Last edited by: Hobbs,
 
Posts: 4651 | Location: Bathing in the stream of consciousness ~~~ | Registered: July 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Ogie:
Apparently my memory has failed me with the blade length. I can't find anywhere where the blade was four inches. Also, I thought I bought my Buck 110 in late 1979, or early 1980. According to the handy page that dates Buck knives, I purchased my knife in 1981. Two dots on each side of the "110". Thanks for the info!

That's a fine knife Ogie !!! Being a 1981, I'm not sure of the steel. Prior to '81, Buck used 440C steel. In the 1981-1982 time frame, Buck went to 425M steel. The fact your blade bent when "abused" rather than break or snap, leads me to purely speculate that it is likely 425M but I don't "know".

Joe Houser, maker of knives, historian for Buck Knives Inc and lives in Post Falls, Idaho has this to say from a "been there done that" guy about Buck Knives and steel that was and is used in Buck Knives ...

quote:
One thing I do know about our 440C, 425mod, and 420hc is that we get the same basic rockwell out of each of them. 58 to 60 was the range and that was Chuck's law, never to be trifled with.

When we were using 440C the edge geometry was a lot diferent than our Edge 2000 geometry. The comment most often heard during the 440c years was that Buck knives held a great edge, but boy was it hard to get that edge on.

Those earlier knives had an extra operation in production that we called a "flat edge". Take a look at a new 110 from back then and you can still see a faint line running the length of the edge. That edge was slightly radiused too, thus lending to the hard to resharpen comments because how do you lay a blade edge flat on a stone if the edge is not flat to begin with? Those blades were thicker through the hollow grind which meant they could stand up to more prying, but again, made it a lot harder to resharpen as you got higher up in the blade.

VERY tough edge and tough blade for sure but our customers were telling us thay wanted something they could sharpen. Gradual changes in the blade and edge geometry took place over the years to address this need.

Off the top of my head I think we did away with the flat edge operation before we went to 425mod.

Before we changed from 425mod to 420hc, Chuck had to be convinced that we would still get our 58-60 hardness. We did numerous tests in heat treat, and backed them up on our C.A.T.R.A. machine, a device that tests several aspects of an edge, before we made the switch.

Many of our opinions on which steel is best are clouded by all the other variables that really need to be considered together. I hear someone swear that his 103 skinner from the 60's is the best knife ever and I know that if I took a 2007 Skinner, and ground the edge the same as his, it would likely perform the same. Does that mean that we should go back to the earlier geometry? Nope. It means that for that particular person, that particular combination of rockwell, geometry, angle, works best for him and his particular needs.

My opinion has always been that to a certain extent, everybody uses their knives differently, and sharpen them differently so they should find the knife and sharpening technique that works best for their needs. The best thing that Buck can do to help is deliver a consistent edge to begin with. We shoot for a 26 to 32 degree included angle, which our research has shown is a good all around edge. You might want a lower number for a fillet blade and a higher number for chisel. We also made the edge more visible, easier to see and lay flat on the stone. It may appear that the edge is actually higher but that illusion is due to the fact that we don't polish the burr off anymore in the final sharpening operation. To polish it would be to give it a slight radius so we now strop it off, leaving it good and flat, therefore easier to sharpen for the customer.

We changed from 440C to 425mod because we wanted to fineblank our blades. If we could fineblank them, we could get greater accuracy on our tolerances. Much more accurate than trying to mill and drill later. We could also make the blades quicker which translated into keeping our cost down, always a good thing. This is vastly different than saying we "went to a cheaper steel to cut costs". Remember Chuck's law, only then it was also Al Buck's law. That 425mod was a special steel the mill made for Buck, and we paid for it.

Then years later, at the mills request, we considered the change from 425mod to our current 420hc. We were the only ones that wanted 425mod and they mainly made it for us because they liked us...seriously! But 420hc was an on the shelf variety of steel and was basically the same so...Many test later, as mentioned above, and we made the switch. Again, not Buck switching to a cheaper steel, just Buck finding a better way to keep its costs down without impacting the customer. Its a win win, my employer stays in business and we continue to deliver a quality knife.


Regardless of steel composition, enjoy your knife Ogie. All the steels Buck uses and has used, along with their legendary heat treat are some of the best steels and at a bargain price. That Buck 110 of yours is a true American classic and rightly so !!! ... VERY Nice
 
Posts: 4651 | Location: Bathing in the stream of consciousness ~~~ | Registered: July 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Regardless of steel composition, enjoy your knife Ogie. All the steels Buck uses and has used, along with their legendary heat treat are some of the best steels and at a bargain price. That Buck 110 of yours is a true American classic and rightly so !!! ... VERY Nice


Thanks for all the great info!! It is, and always has been, really sharp! I use the 30 degree setting on my Sharpmaker and that seems to work well.
 
Posts: 5870 | Location: Northwest Indiana | Registered: August 15, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I'll cut to the chase and get to the point ...
Going lite today ... BUCK 112 Ranger LT

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Hobbs,
 
Posts: 4651 | Location: Bathing in the stream of consciousness ~~~ | Registered: July 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Doing what I'm doing. Sunday down time and idly busy developing my "Sebenza thumb". I've taken the Sebenza apart to debur and smooth washer faces on a ceramic stone and re-lubed. When horizontal with blade open and lock bar pressure released, blade DROPS. Awesome !!! ... but detent is strong with this one.

... smoke 'em if you got 'em



 
Posts: 4651 | Location: Bathing in the stream of consciousness ~~~ | Registered: July 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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... and a couple taken today for another forum but works to share here too I guess
Ollech & Wajs (Zurich) ~ Cougar
Chris Reeve Sebenza 31 Natural Canvas Micarta



 
Posts: 4651 | Location: Bathing in the stream of consciousness ~~~ | Registered: July 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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__________________________

"We're after men - and I wish to God I was with them. The next time you make a mistake, I'm going to ride off and let you die." - Deke Thornton, - The Wild Bunch
 
Posts: 675 | Location: 'The Hive' beneath Raccoon City | Registered: February 07, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Festina Lente
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by eTripper:


“Toting” being the operative word. In wheelbarrow or on a dolly? Nice, but hefty...



NRA Life Member - "Fear God and Dreadnaught"
 
Posts: 8022 | Location: in the red zone of the blue state, CT | Registered: October 15, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of Ironbutt
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quote:
Originally posted by Hobbs:
Doing what I'm doing. Sunday down time and idly busy developing my "Sebenza thumb". .....


I know what you mean. I have a Sebenza 25 & two Inkosi's, and when I got my first CRK my right thumb was kind of tender until it started forming a callous.


------------------------------------------------

"It's hard to imagine a more stupid or dangerous way of making decisions, than by putting those decisions in the hands of people who pay no price for being wrong."
Thomas Sowell
 
Posts: 1096 | Location: PA | Registered: September 01, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Ironbutt:
I know what you mean. I have a Sebenza 25 & two Inkosi's, and when I got my first CRK my right thumb was kind of tender until it started forming a callous.

That pointy thumb stud is on that blade purely for torture purposes !!! ... I'm convinced of it LOL.

Actually the procedure I've adopted is to place my thumbnail beneath and against the stud for leverage rather than use the fleshy pad of my thumb. So really, there is no discomfort there when opening the blade.

The fleshy part of my thumb is adapting to the lockbar when closing the blade !!! ... as stated, the detent is strong with this one HA ... but not too bad Wink
 
Posts: 4651 | Location: Bathing in the stream of consciousness ~~~ | Registered: July 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The weekend's over
It's Monday already
... but don't let a teardrop fall

And speaking of Natural Canvas Micarta ...
Has anyone seen my GEC teardrop pattern (852221) Crown Lifter?
Wait ... nevermind ... it's in my pocket

 
Posts: 4651 | Location: Bathing in the stream of consciousness ~~~ | Registered: July 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Festina Lente
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Just got this one - by Williams Blade Designs - their Shobu Zukuri Folder (Black Ultralight) 3.75” blade.

I really like the look, Darth Vader's EDC. Plenty sharp - nipped my left thumb flipping it in. very nice action, no play. All in all, recommended.




Propaganda from their website:

Milled from a solid piece of lightweight 7075 Aluminum, with a tough Sleipner steel blade, this folder is the Ultralight version of the SZF Series. The Black edition is our reduced signature offering with a black oxide finished blade and hardware for covert carry. For this project we utilized LionSteel’s expertise as pioneers in solid knife technology. The result is an integral folder that is both exceptionally strong and lightweight.

Steel: Sleipner (60-61 HRC)
Blade shape: Shobu Zukuri
Blade length: 3.75” | 95mm
Blade Thickness: 0.16” | 4mm
Blade Finish: Black Oxide
Handle Material: Black Anodized 7075 Al
Handle Width: 0.5” | 12mm
Overall Length: 8.5” | 217mm
Weight: 3.5oz | 99g
Manufacturer: LionSteel
Design: Christopher Williams
Batch Quantity: 200 pieces
Batch Number: 002
Release: February 2021
Made in: Maniago, Italy



NRA Life Member - "Fear God and Dreadnaught"
 
Posts: 8022 | Location: in the red zone of the blue state, CT | Registered: October 15, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Had to look Sleipner steel up. Found it to be between something like A2 and D2. D2 is said to better than Sleipner in terms of corrosion resistance, and A2 is slightly better in hardness. I like A2 and D2, so I think I'd like Sleipner just fine. Said Sleipner will also take up to a 64HRC ... Dang !!!
 
Posts: 4651 | Location: Bathing in the stream of consciousness ~~~ | Registered: July 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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__________________________

"We're after men - and I wish to God I was with them. The next time you make a mistake, I'm going to ride off and let you die." - Deke Thornton, - The Wild Bunch
 
Posts: 675 | Location: 'The Hive' beneath Raccoon City | Registered: February 07, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Hobbs:
Northwoods Knives was founded by Dave Shirley and was a one man operation. Dave would have folks like Queen Cutlery make (SFO) knives for him to high standards and branded as Northwoods.

Dave Shirley sold the Northwoods brand to Knives Ship Free founder, Derrick Bohne, a decade or so ago. There were two conditions to the sale of Northwoods from Shirley to Bohne ... 1) that it remain a made-in-USA brand; and 2) that the knives continue to be high-quality tools.

The knives that Derrick Bohne had produced by Queen and GEC as special factory orders for Northwoods, are not only of high quality, but always in high demand and often sold out within hours of each Northwood's knife release.

Sadly, both Dave Shirley and Derrick Bohne have passed away. I have several Northwoods that Derrick Bohne released and they are among my favorites. But I also have three Northwoods that were released back when Dave Shirley was at the helm of Northwoods.

This Green Bone Slim Jack (D2 steel) is one Northwoods from Dave Shirley. It's unique to me in that it is the only green bone handled knife I have. It's long and very slim. I've relegated it to letter opening duties ... and maybe a string or package tape here and there.


Nice looking knife. Reminds me very much of a Case I had as a teenager in the sixties; looks like same size and shape. One of my favorite folders. Don't know what happened to it; might get lucky and find it someday.
 
Posts: 2403 | Registered: November 02, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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