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When will the coronavirus arrive in the US? (Disease: COVID-19; Virus: SARS-CoV-2) Login/Join 
Legalize the Constitution
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Tucker Carlson covered a story of 3M corporation not filling orders for N-95s placed a month ago by states like Florida, whose Emergency Management Director was Tucker’s guest. Turns out, after the Florida official spent the day working his way up the food chain at 3M, that 3M’s “authorized distributors” are selling these masks to foreign buyers who show up with “cash in hand.” American state emergency management organizations, hospitals, and first responders are being pushed down for profits, and badly needed supplies shipped overseas.

I’m certain that by tomorrow morning a video of the segment will be available. Don’t miss it!


__________________________________________________________
Forgive me my nonsense, as I also forgive the nonsense of those that think they talk sense.
- Robert Frost

Amen
 
Posts: 9737 | Location: Wyoming | Registered: January 10, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Void Where Prohibited
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This came up during the President's briefing today. He's going to come down hard on this and tomorrow will authorize the USPS, UPS, Customs, Border Patrol and others to block these shipments.



"If Gun Control worked, Chicago would look like Mayberry, not Thunderdome" - Cam Edwards
 
Posts: 15255 | Location: Under the Boot of Tyranny in Connectistan | Registered: February 02, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Here’s a question for the medical staff here on the forum. Given that enough ventilators are produced and distributed to any and all hospitals in need, how many ventilators can one health professional manage on a shift? Is it a specialty skill, or is it within the scope of an average nurse’s training? I’m assuming not, but am curious as to the burden. I’m also assuming if one is on a ventilator it is 24/7 management until you are off of it. Thanks in advance!



 
Posts: 4665 | Registered: July 06, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The SARS-CoV-2 (cause of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic respiratory disease) will be with us for a long time.

We are used to the seasonal flu.

And whether you get the flu shot or not (statement not a question).

It would seem, that from this thread, the President and the Administration, conversations, health news and (uggh) the media, there are four measures at our disposal:

- Identifying every case rapidly with extensive testing, and isolating cases.

- Tracking and quarantine of contacts.

- Travel restrictions.

- Social distancing (including lockdown) to reduce contact (and therefore spread of infection) between people.

Yup, there will be some with Constitutional and Rights issues of the above, and not to dilute that in any way.

If your President asked the above measures of you, would you?

No need to reply a yes or no, or something else, or start a survey in this thread.

Just think about it. You and yours to protect.

--chris



We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." ~ Benjamin Franklin.

SIGForum: the island of reality in an ocean of diarrhoea.
 
Posts: 1639 | Location: You smell that? | Registered: February 20, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Ammoholic
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quote:
Originally posted by Doc H.:
quote:
Originally posted by PowerSurge:
quote:
Originally posted by chellim1:
It will be interesting to see what happens in Sweden over the next few weeks...
What if it doesn't progress any faster than places (like the US) that have voluntarily collapsed their own economy?

If that happens then obviously everyone overreacted.


Sweden's fatality rate per identified cases today is 5.5%. In the US we would have had over 13,000 fatalities at this point with the same data, more than double the current number. We couldn't have asked a country to do this, but it will be important data in the final analysis. Their strategy appears to be costing them, and there is now some substantial questioning of their government's decision by the public.


I wonder what effect it would have if we chose to let 2.5m of the oldest and sickest (plus some of the healthy ones that are just unlucky) die? Provided only pain medicine unless it was 100% certain they'd live through it.

Would our country come out stronger? Medicare would be rid of it's most expensive customers. SS insolvency would be pushed back a few years, health insurance premiums may go down slightly. Inheritance would pass on to the younger generations sooner.

The mass graves or burn pits would be problematic, but the economy would have chugged along ok with companies staffing at 70% as employees that live are home recovering for three+ weeks. The body bag manufacturing and lime industry would see returns like they'd never seen.



Jesse

Sic Semper Tyrannis
 
Posts: 17208 | Location: Loudoun County, Virginia | Registered: December 27, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Oh stewardess,
I speak jive.
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quote:
Originally posted by parabellum:
I want you guys to be nice to each other.

No drama here. Good natured fun.
 
Posts: 24370 | Registered: March 12, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by comet24:
So as more people get it and can not get it again it will become more difficult to spread and our medical systems can keep up with it better than they can currently.


This is true, but for the effect to be significant, a LOT of people need to be immune. The IHME model President Trump referenced yesterday, based on stay-at-home through the end of May, only predicts about 3% of the population becoming infected in that time. That isn't enough for a meaningful herd immunity effect.

The initial, nobody-does-anything-differently estimate was 40-70% of the population ultimately becoming infected. (Which doesn't seem unreasonable - this virus appears to be more infectious than flu, and despite ~40% of the population being vaccinated and many people having some immunity from past infections, in bad years 15-20% of the population gets the flu.)
 
Posts: 5418 | Location: TX | Registered: January 24, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Houston Police Chief: Burglaries Up 20 Percent After Coronavirus Stay-Home Orders

https://www.breitbart.com/bord...02&utm_content=Final

Houston Police Department Chief Art Acevedo said burglaries in the city are up 20 percent since the issuance of “Stay-Home, Work-Safe” orders put in place by Harris County.

“Right now, burglaries have spiked 20 percent,” Chief Acevedo told Breitbart Texas in a phone interview. “Some people are seeing the shutdown of businesses as a target-rich opportunity. Habitual burglars should not be released.”

The chief said that there needs to be a plan for what to do with habitual criminals that are being released from the Harris County jail under orders from County Judge Lina Hidalgo. “What happens to these folks after they are released,” the chief asked. “What is the plan?”

Acevedo said Judge Hidalgo did not consult with him about the issue of releasing criminals from the county jail, a large percentage of which were arrested by his officers.

Police in other cities are also reporting increases in burglaries after stay-at-home orders are issued by local authorities.

Statistics reported by the New York City Police Department’s CompStat website show a 21.8 percent increase in burglaries in the last 28 days. The site also reports auto thefts are up by 64.2 percent during the same period. Murders, robbery, and shooting incidents also showed increases.

Minneapolis police and business owners also expressed concerns over burglaries as more businesses and stores are closed due to stay-at-home orders, the StarTribune reported. Since February 5 the number of burglaries nearly doubled.

“I don’t think we’ve seen anything quite like this, but we do know when we are in times of economic crisis, that we see certain types of crime go up, so things like burglaries, robberies and domestic violence,” Hamline University criminology Prof. Jillian Peterson told the Minnesota newspaper.

Despite promises that violent criminals would not be releases, KTRK ABC13 in Houston reports that some were released on bonds as low as $10.

The Houston ABC affiliate reports:

Kelvin Hawthorne, 18, is accused of punching and choking his girlfriend on Monday. Normally, that kind of crime gets a $1000 bond and often times it’s a personal recognizance bond, which means release from jail on the promise to return.

On Tuesday, a judge granted Hawthorne a $100 bond. He paid $10, had to agree to bond conditions and was released from jail.

Craig Jones, 55, is accused of hitting and choking his wife. He has prior violent convictions. The state requested a $10,000 bond. On Tuesday, a magistrate made it much lower, granting a $300 bond.

Timothy Singleton, 21, also has prior convictions. He was charged with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon, after being accused of pulling a gun on his aunt’s neighbor. Singleton was granted a $500 bond, which means $50 would get him out of jail. Normally bond would be at least $20,000.

Tori McFarland, 23, accused of robbery with bodily injury, a violent crime, got out of jail on a $10 bond.

In anticipation of a mass-release of inmates, including violent felons, Governor Abbott issued an executive order that prohibits the release of “any person convicted of a crime that involves violence or the threat of violence, or a person currently arrested for such a crime.”

However, some of Harris County’s misdemeanor court judges plan on sidestepping the order, the Houston Chronicle reported.

“Instead, the judges will continue to abide by a federal order signed last year that called for the release of low-level defendants on no-cash bail, or personal bonds, the letter said,” according to the Houston newspaper. “Abbott’s executive order prohibited releasing defendants previously accused or convicted of a violent crime on personal bonds.”

“Using the pandemic to advance that agenda is wrong and counter-productive to the legitimate reform of the criminal justice system and bonds,” he expressed. He cited the release last week of David Cruz. Inmate Cruz is charged with murder and was released on a personal recognizance bond because of concerns about COVID-19.

“The last thing our community needs are decisions that further exacerbate public anxiety and risk to the people we serve,” Chief Acevedo concluded. “Releases of persons charged with high-level offenses place the community in grave danger and must be prevented. Violent and habitual offenders (especially burglars) need to remain in quarantine in jail.”

Acevedo told Breitbart Texas that 14 police officers under his command tested positive for the Coronavirus as of Wednesday. He said two of the officers required hospitalization — one of those recovered, the more recent case is in stable condition.

“One of my officers who initially tested positive for the virus has recently been cleared to return to work,” the chief said. “That is good news.”


______________________________________________________________________________

Guard with jealous attention the public liberty. Suspect everyone who approaches that jewel. Unfortunately, nothing will preserve it but downright force. Whenever you give up that force, you are ruined…. The great object is that every man be armed. Everyone who is able might have a gun.”
– Patrick Henry, Speech to the Virginia Ratifying Convention, June 5, 1778
 
Posts: 8091 | Registered: January 17, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by chellim1:
quote:
Originally posted by Patriot:
China start a war? Why? For what reason
Land?...they have plenty
Power?...they have plenty of that too.
Ideology?...maybe, but I think they are quite happy with their mix of communism/capitalism.
No... no giant world wars any time soon. The wars to be fought will be economic and through cyber.

I agree... mostly. The wars to be fought will be primarily economic and through cyber. Spreading this disease (James Woods videos top of page 291), intentionally, through Chinese agents mixed into our population seems to be part of that. They have brought our economy to a grounding halt.

quote:
Power?...they have plenty of that too.

That part I have to disagree with. Yes, they have power but they clearly have a desire to dominate. The desire for power becomes an insatiable lust.
All this talk of physical warfare between the US and China I find humorous. Why on earth would China do anything? The US has been damaging its own economy in favor of the Chinese economy for years, and recently, due to this virus, has stepped up that effort 100 fold. China needs to do little more than sit back and wait while we do all the heavy lifting for them. If something doesn't change, and change substantially in the way the US views its relationship with China and the world, China will evolve into the leadership role of the world economy, and they won't have to do a thing warlike to reach that position.


-----------------------------
Guns are awesome because they shoot solid lead freedom. Every man should have several guns. And several dogs, because a man with a cat is a woman. Kurt Schlichter
 
Posts: 30266 | Location: Orlando, FL | Registered: April 30, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of maladat
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quote:
Originally posted by tanner:
Here’s a question for the medical staff here on the forum. Given that enough ventilators are produced and distributed to any and all hospitals in need, how many ventilators can one health professional manage on a shift? Is it a specialty skill, or is it within the scope of an average nurse’s training? I’m assuming not, but am curious as to the burden. I’m also assuming if one is on a ventilator it is 24/7 management until you are off of it. Thanks in advance!


Not a doc, but my son spent some time in the NICU on a ventilator when he was born. The NICU doctors and nurses adjusted some things, but the people who were "in charge" of the ventilators were called respiratory therapists. My understanding is that RTs are not nurses and receive specialized training in managing respiratory support equipment (there's a lot of stuff besides ventilators).

When he was transferred between hospitals (a process which took about 2 hours), both a NICU nurse and an RT were on the transport team.
 
Posts: 5418 | Location: TX | Registered: January 24, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by maladat:
quote:
Originally posted by tanner:
Here’s a question for the medical staff here on the forum. Given that enough ventilators are produced and distributed to any and all hospitals in need, how many ventilators can one health professional manage on a shift? Is it a specialty skill, or is it within the scope of an average nurse’s training? I’m assuming not, but am curious as to the burden. I’m also assuming if one is on a ventilator it is 24/7 management until you are off of it. Thanks in advance!


Not a doc, but my son spent some time in the NICU on a ventilator when he was born. The NICU doctors and nurses adjusted some things, but the people who were "in charge" of the ventilators were called respiratory therapists. My understanding is that RTs are not nurses and receive specialized training in managing respiratory support equipment (there's a lot of stuff besides ventilators).

When he was transferred between hospitals (a process which took about 2 hours), both a NICU nurse and an RT were on the transport team.


Thanks! So I’m curious, is it one RT per patient, or can an RT manage several patients simultaneously? The nut of it, is even if we have the ventilator equipment, will we have the number of RT’s to manage the load? I’m assuming that people just can’t learn the stuff as OJT.



 
Posts: 4665 | Registered: July 06, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Houston Police Chief: Burglaries Up 20 Percent After Coronavirus Stay-Home Orders


Wouldn’t that also mean “hot home invasions” are up too, since more folks are staying home?


---------------------
"Sometimes I wonder whether the world is being run by smart people who are putting us on, or by imbeciles who really mean it." — Mark Twain

“Every normal man must be tempted, at times, to spit on his hands, hoist the black flag, and begin slitting throats.” — H. L. Mencken
 
Posts: 2047 | Location: Falls of the Ohio River, Kain-tuk-e | Registered: January 13, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by SigSentry:
^date? Who knows. I do wonder if there will be Cuomo facemasks at the DNC on August 17th.


MAGA masks will be out shortly!
 
Posts: 2621 | Registered: March 22, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by tanner:
Thanks! So I’m curious, is it one RT per patient, or can an RT manage several patients simultaneously? The nut of it, is even if we have the ventilator equipment, will we have the number of RT’s to manage the load? I’m assuming that people just can’t learn the stuff as OJT.


I can't speak to anything but the two NICUs my son was in, but in them, a NICU nurse would be assigned 1-4 patients depending on the severity of the patient (my son had a dedicated nurse for a couple weeks, then shared a nurse with one other baby for the rest of his NICU stay) but the RTs all had larger groups of patients.

As a non-medical person, some of the simpler respiratory support devices (like CPAP and nasal cannulae) seemed pretty simple to manage but the ventilators, especially the fancy ones, have a lot of complicated settings and screwing them up can cause big problems.
 
Posts: 5418 | Location: TX | Registered: January 24, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Disney World and Disneyland announced they are furloughing most workers. The article does not give exact numbers, but my conservative estimate is 50K workers, high end is 100K workers.

https://www.bizjournals.com/or...ana=yahoo&yptr=yahoo
 
Posts: 1637 | Location: Orlando | Registered: April 22, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by maladat:
quote:
Originally posted by bigdeal:
And now we've circled completely back to the beginning of this debate, and what I argued from the beginning. Without a vaccine to inoculate the public to prevent the spread and/or to kill existing infection, social distancing is nothing more than trying to hold back the ocean knowing full well that's impossible. The minute restrictions are lifted, the infection rate will take off again. So do we....

1) Be restricted to our homes for the next year plus until a vaccine can be fully vetted and distributed, while the US economy craters leaving an environment far more devastating than the virus we've been hiding from, or,
2) Do we accept a certain mortality rate, try and protect those most at risk, continue to work toward a vaccine, but turn the economy back on and deal with what ensues.

I fear I know what the answer will be.


With a greatly expanded testing capacity and more people actually taking this virus seriously, there's at least a possibility that, if we can get the number of active cases low enough first, we can control the spread of the disease with aggressive testing, contact tracing, and individual quarantine and much less restrictive population-wide measures.
To that I would simply offer...Never gonna happen. The country is too big and our society simply isn't going to bend to the level of tracking and control you're alluding to. The is however a warning that government needs to be well aware of. The longer you hold people down in their homes while their lives and livelihoods disappear before their eyes, the less cooperative they are gonna be.


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Guns are awesome because they shoot solid lead freedom. Every man should have several guns. And several dogs, because a man with a cat is a woman. Kurt Schlichter
 
Posts: 30266 | Location: Orlando, FL | Registered: April 30, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Fighting the good fight
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quote:
Originally posted by 2BobTanner:
quote:
Houston Police Chief: Burglaries Up 20 Percent After Coronavirus Stay-Home Orders


Wouldn’t that also mean “hot home invasions” are up too, since more folks are staying home?


The article is referring to specifically commercial burglaries.

That is, burglaries of stores and businesses, which are now closed for extended periods.

So no, that would not correlate to a similar increase in home invasions.
 
Posts: 25347 | Location: Northwest Arkansas | Registered: January 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by wcb6092:
Houston Police Chief: Burglaries Up 20 Percent After Coronavirus Stay-Home Orders
Free not, ole Art's got it all under control. Honest question. How in the hell do moron's like this idiot get elected to a position of authority like Chief of police? Garbage collector, sure. Chief of police? Holy Hell!



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Guns are awesome because they shoot solid lead freedom. Every man should have several guns. And several dogs, because a man with a cat is a woman. Kurt Schlichter
 
Posts: 30266 | Location: Orlando, FL | Registered: April 30, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
A Grateful American
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"the meaning of life, is to give life meaning" I could explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.
 
Posts: 40659 | Location: fl | Registered: December 20, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Live Slow,
Die Whenever
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I like these quotes I found-

“Two things can be true at once.

1. Quarantine measures need to be taken right now in order to get the virus under control and keep people alive.

2. The extent of the quarantine measures can be questioned and challenged in order for us to keep the economy alive.

The fact that we can only talk about the former without being accused of wanting more people to die just goes to show how much we let pure emotion dictate our lives right now.”

“There isn’t actually any contradiction in the beliefs that (A) The virus is dangerous, (B) Mass unemployment is dangerous, and (C) authoritarian Government policies are dangerous. There needn’t be any cognitive dissonance holding all three at once; they’re not mutually exclusive.”



"I won't be wronged, I won't be insulted, and I won't be laid a hand on. I don't do these things to other people and I require the same from them."
- John Wayne in "The Shootist"
 
Posts: 3162 | Location: California | Registered: May 31, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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