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paradox in a box
Picture of frayedends
posted
So now I got the Suburu with the roof rack and I live near lots of ponds and lakes. I want a kayak. My girlfriend would also like one. We will only be paddling around lakes and ponds, maybe the Nashua river. No rapids, hardly any waves. All fresh water.

I know nothing about them. We don't want to spend much. Would like stable, easy to load on car, fairly easy to handle in the water. I have no idea what length is good for beginners. I may do some fishing from mine. But I am no fisherman and it would be just an excuse to hang out on the water and relax. Nevertheless, a place to put fishing stuff would not hurt.

Like to stay under $500 if possible.




These go to eleven.
 
Posts: 9961 | Location: Lancaster, MA | Registered: November 14, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Over your budget, but I love my Dagger Axis 12. it's a sit inside. Handles well, has a skeg (think of a droppable rudder that points straight) to help it track better but give flexibility maneuvering when up), and has a comfy seat!


ETA, check out Austin Kayak. Sign up for their newsletter, you can often get discounts or ship free deals.

Also, try a local kayak shop, maybe they have demo days or something.




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Posts: 2378 | Location: Carlsbad NM/ Augusta GA | Registered: July 15, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Wilderness Systems, PUNGO 120. Stable, straight, smooth.

Expect to spend more, and remember the lighter the paddle, the more comfortable, and expensive it is. BUT, makes a huge difference in enjoyment. Buy life vests for kayaks, worth it.


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Posts: 744 | Location: Virginia | Registered: October 29, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
paradox in a box
Picture of frayedends
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quote:
Originally posted by Dreamerx4:
Wilderness Systems, PUNGO 120. Stable, straight, smooth.

Expect to spend more, and remember the lighter the paddle, the more comfortable, and expensive it is. BUT, makes a huge difference in enjoyment. Buy life vests for kayaks, worth it.


Actually already have kayak life vests. We joined a local lake club last year that had kayaks but their vests were horrible big orange things so we bought our own. Smile I figure I'll have to spend more for the kayak but hoping not a lot more. I'll look for good used as well.




These go to eleven.
 
Posts: 9961 | Location: Lancaster, MA | Registered: November 14, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
goodheart
Picture of sjtill
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Depends on budget.
Rotomolded plastic kayaks are pretty good, fiberglass/Kevlar better but much more expensive.
Recommend you rent several times, several different kayaks, then go on Craigslist and buy one for 1/2 the cost of new.
Tandems can be nice too, no problem staying together.
If I were buying new and had the budget for it, would look at Eddyline kayaks.


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Posts: 14943 | Location: One hop from Paradise | Registered: July 27, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
paradox in a box
Picture of frayedends
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Girlfriend is suggesting these just to get starters and make sure we use them enough. I'm skeptical. The blue is on sale very cheap. It's sort of a ride on top. I was thinking we should have "sit in" type.

Does it matter the style? Is one more comfy?

https://www.amazon.com/SUNDOLP...truments&sr=8-4&th=1




These go to eleven.
 
Posts: 9961 | Location: Lancaster, MA | Registered: November 14, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Charmingly unsophisticated
Picture of AllenInWV
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I am not a big fan of the cheaper box-store kayaks like the Sundolphins. But then again, when I go paddling, it's usually for 6+ hours. Comfort is kind of a big deal, and the seats in the more expensive kayaks are leaps and bounds ahead of the cheaper ones.

One option; inflatable kayaks. I just bought an Advanced Elements from Austin Kayak that was just under $500. It is supposed to be pretty comfortable and very capable compared to a hard shell kayak


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Posts: 15234 | Location: Cross Lanes, WV | Registered: February 05, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Not as lean, not as mean,
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Honestly, for that budget I'd check Craigslist or Facebook Marketplace and get a used model. Use it for a season, find what aspect you like and dislike, and then upgrade next season.

That's what we're did, I actually upgraded in the fall clearance sales and got an Old Town fishing kayak for about 60% summer retail.




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Posts: 2474 | Location: Southern Maine | Registered: February 10, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
The success of a solution usually depends upon your point of view
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Too many choices, try and find some places that will let you try them out or an outfitter that rents them.

Sit in vs sit on - if you are just going to just paddle around a sit in makes sense. Lower center of gravity mean better stability. If you are going to fish or want to be able to jump in and swim and play a sit on makes more sense.

Length and width - the length and width work together. Generally, a longer kayak will “track” or maintain a straighter line with each stroke. A narrower kayak will paddle easier with more distance per stroke while a wider kayak will take more effort to move through the water but will have more stability (not feel as tippy). You need to find the combination that best works for you.

For an example, i have a Tarpon 140 which is 14 feet long and 28 inches wide sit on top. I fish out of it and i sometimes make long runs so i traded the ability to stand up in it for the better tracking and easier paddling (long and narrow). Modern hull designs also have more of an impact on the characteristics then earlier designs.

Nothing will beat having the chance to try different hulls to find the combination that will best do what you want from it.



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Posts: 3042 | Location: Jacksonville, FL | Registered: September 10, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Ocean Kayak- Malibu II. Very stable, has 3 seats, so can use as a 2 person or a 1 person kayak. They carry a lot of weight, paddle nicely, etc. etc. I wouldn't have a sit in, unless I was doing something that required it. I much prefer SOT and I certainly wouldn't buy cheap.
 
Posts: 17241 | Registered: June 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Irksome Whirling Dervish
Picture of Flashlightboy
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I do a fair amount of SOT kayaking. From my years of experience, my nuggets of info are:

1. Kayaking is fun! If you kayak and aren't consumed by fun then it isn't for you.

2. Try the site Austin Kayak for tons of info. They sell everything and have tons of reviews. Excellent reference source, if nothing else.

3. DO NOT buy a tandem. It's the fastest way to get into a fight between the two of you. It's a horrible way to kayak. Front person wants to paddle at their own pace and steer and the person in back who is doing most of the work struggles to keep the strokes the same.


4. Rent a kayak first. It's cheap.

5. You've expressed an interest in a general purpose or recreational kayak. A sit on top (SOT) will fill the bill. Expect to pay $500-$800. Just the way it is.

6. Size matters. A 10 foot kayak is highly manuverable but not as stable or as fast as longer one. Your weight matters too since a 10 foot probably has a capacity of 250 lbs or so. I think 12 foot is good overall compromise but love a 14 foot even more. Those are $800+.

7. Most SOTs come with rails and other things that make them equipable for fishing. Really can't get away from that unless you go for a very basic recreational SOT. The fun will all be the same.

8. Paddles matter, like others have said. Even a cheap $100 paddle will motor you around however after going on 4-6 trips, you'll see why an expensive paddle is better.

9. You will need a PFD. I personally like a manual inflatable which costs around $100. Very low profile and does not get in the way of your stroke.
 
Posts: 3166 | Location: "You can't just go to Walmart with a gift card and get a new brother." Janice Serrano | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Flashlightboy:
9. You will need a PFD. I personally like a manual inflatable which costs around $100. Very low profile and does not get in the way of your stroke.


I agree with most of your points, but this one I disagree with.

I am fine with quality automatic inflatable PFDs. I have one and I use it for some boating activities.

I can't think of a situation in which I would wear a manual inflatable, unless it was absolutely the only thing available.

I'm a good swimmer. I don't fish way offshore, so I am almost never somewhere I couldn't swim to land if I had to.

To me, the main benefit of a PFD is to keep me from drowning if I am for some reason unable to swim - like if I was knocked unconscious or had a stroke or something.

If I can't swim, I probably can't operate a manual inflatable PFD, either.
 
Posts: 4583 | Location: TX | Registered: January 24, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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For a used kayak, if you could find a Natural Designs ocean paddling kayak, they are a thing of beauty. Out of production for many years though. I also agree that buying a used one would be the best way to start. After a year of paddling you will have a better idea of what you want.


-c1steve
 
Posts: 2558 | Location: West coast | Registered: March 31, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Irksome Whirling Dervish
Picture of Flashlightboy
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quote:
Originally posted by maladat:
quote:
Originally posted by Flashlightboy:
9. You will need a PFD. I personally like a manual inflatable which costs around $100. Very low profile and does not get in the way of your stroke.


I agree with most of your points, but this one I disagree with.

I am fine with quality automatic inflatable PFDs. I have one and I use it for some boating activities.

I can't think of a situation in which I would wear a manual inflatable, unless it was absolutely the only thing available.

I'm a good swimmer. I don't fish way offshore, so I am almost never somewhere I couldn't swim to land if I had to.

To me, the main benefit of a PFD is to keep me from drowning if I am for some reason unable to swim - like if I was knocked unconscious or had a stroke or something.

If I can't swim, I probably can't operate a manual inflatable PFD, either.


That's a fair criticism and it highlights the two different thoughts of manual v. automatic. You make a valid argument for an automatic although I would offer that not all water sports suggest an automatic. Motor sports for sure but for SOT or paddle boarding the risk is very low that you will be tossed overboard in an unconsious fashion. You could be but the odds are low.

On my last outing someone in another SOT was experimenting with rocking their kayak to see what the pitch limits were when they went over. With an automatic their kayaking day would be over since you'd have no way to rearm the pfd but with a manual, the day continues on.

While extremely expensive and well beyond what the OP wanted to pay, a hydrostatic unit would cover all bases.
 
Posts: 3166 | Location: "You can't just go to Walmart with a gift card and get a new brother." Janice Serrano | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
paradox in a box
Picture of frayedends
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I’m thinking we want sit in kayaks for stability. As I mentioned we already have kayak pfds that we’ve used a lot and are happy with. But good info. Thanks. I’ll look up a few of these later.




These go to eleven.
 
Posts: 9961 | Location: Lancaster, MA | Registered: November 14, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I would get a 10 foot one. easier to lug around and perfectly fine for smaller bodies of water!!

https://www.scheels.com/p/perc...yak/72928210039.html
 
Posts: 6817 | Location: Bismarck ND | Registered: February 19, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Irksome Whirling Dervish
Picture of Flashlightboy
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A SOT is more stable then SI. Most all SOT are a tri-hull design that is extremely stable to the point where you seeing your legs over the side of the kayak and it won't tip.

A SI is nowhere near as stable in terms of tip resistance and if you wear the skirt you have to learn extrication techniques and rollover ones too.

Nothing is as stable as a SOT. It's not as sleek as a SI but much more stable.
 
Posts: 3166 | Location: "You can't just go to Walmart with a gift card and get a new brother." Janice Serrano | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I'm following this because I'm interested in buying another kayak myself. Last year I picked up a really cheap 10' sit-on kayak at Dick's, it was around $179 including paddle, just to paddle around the pond and let the grandkids play with. Turns out it's getting used more than I anticipated (which is a good thing). It's capacity is only 215# so it's pretty much max'd out with me and my 30# dog in it. My friend is enough lighter that she can carry her 50# dog but it rides a little low in the bow.


So I'm in the market for a nicer one that can carry more, dog, possible camping gear, etc. Also there's a nice slow running stream near by that I'd like to use it on. There are some places that can become shallow in Summer so it will likely be scraping over rocks once in a while. Something along the line of the Wilderness Systems, PUNGO 120 that Dreamerx4 referenced looks interesting.....


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Posts: 4732 | Location: Northern WV | Registered: January 17, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Irksome Whirling Dervish
Picture of Flashlightboy
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Wilderness Systems makes great kayaks. I love using the Tarpon 140.
 
Posts: 3166 | Location: "You can't just go to Walmart with a gift card and get a new brother." Janice Serrano | Registered: May 03, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Savor the limelight
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$500 each or for both?

At $500 each, I'd look at something Perception has to offer.

At $500 for both, I'd look for used kayaks.
 
Posts: 4627 | Location: SWFL | Registered: October 10, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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