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So i am using some of my new found downtime to do some repairs around the house and one of the things I discovered needing attention is a leaky stationary aluminum window on the "weather" side of my house.

Here are my issues...The leak seems to be on the bottom corers and there is a white plastic trim piece that more or less fell apart when i tried to remove it. When removed it reveled a small gap with hard rubber spacers holding the actual window in place and I am not sure how to address the leak with this kind of window and how to replace the plastic trim as I cannot seem to find it anywhere.

Ordinarily I would just caulk the shit out of the thing but I dont want to make things worse.

Anyone else ever deal with this?
 
Posts: 3901 | Location: Peoria, AZ | Registered: November 07, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Paddle your
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If you are talking the outside of the window, I have similar at my house because the damned rough opening is too big for the window.

The window had what looked like a piece of simple crown molding trim installed at the top, which of course was rotten. I replaced it with a piece of the same type molding but the kind made out of pvc.

Then I just caulked the shit out it!! LMAO
 
Posts: 1374 | Location: South Carolina | Registered: August 06, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I believe the part in question is called Vinyl Window Snap in Bead and apparently it is not a local thing.

This is on the inside of the wisndow.

If all else fails I guess I could "caulk the shit out of it then use a spray foam to fill the gaps...the windows in question are behind wood plantation shutters
 
Posts: 3901 | Location: Peoria, AZ | Registered: November 07, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Is it an old-style storm window? If so, the bottom is supposed to allow some drainage.


===
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Posts: 1523 | Location: The Sticks in Wisconsin. | Registered: September 30, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Some good photos would help eliminate a lot of speculation...



There is nothing more permanent than a temporary solution that works.
 
Posts: 2755 | Location: Middle Tennessee | Registered: February 07, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Caulk the shit out of it with 3M 5200. It won't leak and you'll practically need an oscillating saw to cut the 5200 out if you decide to change the window later. We use it on yachts and it is REALLY strong caulk. Make sure to tape both sides with blue tape so you have a nice edge. Caulk it and then smooth the bead out with a wet finger. Peel the tape carefully before the 5200 is dry.

https://www.lowes.com/pd/3M-Ma...Sanded-Caulk/3020020
 
Posts: 19207 | Registered: June 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
semi-reformed sailor
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The 5200 Jimmy is talking about is an adhesive designed for marine uses...and it will never fail short of fire...don’t use that for what you need...

W/o pics this is all conjecture..but if your are not gonna tear them out and start over, just use some silicone caulking and use a wet tool or a wet finger to push it into war you need it to go and then shape it so it will run water off and towards the exterior when it rains.



"Violence, naked force, has settled more issues in history than has any other factor.”
― Robert A. Heinlein, Starship Troopers

 
Posts: 6878 | Location: Texas! | Registered: October 07, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by MikeinNC:
The 5200 Jimmy is talking about is an adhesive designed for marine uses...and it will never fail short of fire...don’t use that for what you need...

W/o pics this is all conjecture..but if your are not gonna tear them out and start over, just use some silicone caulking and use a wet tool or a wet finger to push it into war you need it to go and then shape it so it will run water off and towards the exterior when it rains.


He is bedding a fixed window on the side of his house that never opens. 5200 is the perfect sealant to use because it will stick to old weathered/ half rotten wood (even if it's damp) whereas silicone will not. You can cut through 5200 with a razor knife if you need to remove it. It is not fun but I've removed and re-bedded dozens of deck hatches, port holes and everything in between that were put in with 5200. The OP most likely doesn't ever want it to fail as it's a window attached to the side of his house.

If it was a narrow gap and the wood (or stucco) around it was good, by all means I would use silicone.
 
Posts: 19207 | Registered: June 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Don't, don't, don't use spray foam to fill the gap. I tried this around a window (from the inside) and the stuff worked like a charm.... BUT, it became as hard as cement and put pressure on the window, enough so that once opened, I couldn't shut it. A couple hours of chiseling that stuff out and the window was usable again!!!
 
Posts: 2963 | Registered: February 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Fighting the good fight
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quote:
Originally posted by odin:
Don't, don't, don't use spray foam to fill the gap. I tried this around a window (from the inside) and the stuff worked like a charm.... BUT, it became as hard as cement and put pressure on the window, enough so that once opened, I couldn't shut it. A couple hours of chiseling that stuff out and the window was usable again!!!


Spray foam is fine to fill gaps around window and door frames. You just have to be selective about which spray foam you use. Some spray foam expands aggressively, and can put excessive pressure on the frame, as you discovered.

Instead, look for a minimally expanding, flexible spray foam. These are often marketed as specifically for windows and doors, like so: https://www.greatstuff.dupont....or-foam-sealant.html
 
Posts: 24346 | Location: Northwest Arkansas | Registered: January 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks for the input so far...I will try and post pics later but yest it is the inside of a fixed aluminum frame window.
 
Posts: 3901 | Location: Peoria, AZ | Registered: November 07, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Kevmo:
Thanks for the input so far...I will try and post pics later but yest it is the inside of a fixed aluminum frame window.


5200 would bond perfectly if you want a permanent bond. Sikaflex 221 is also a good adhesive for what you're doing and sticks well to glass and aluminum and yacht builders use it for bedding large windows into aluminum frames. There are both VERY long lasting products and blow away any silicone or caulk that you'll buy at home depot when it comes to longevity.

https://www.merrittsupply.com/...dhesive-and-sealant/
 
Posts: 19207 | Registered: June 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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