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I grew up about 8 miles from Gibsons. and still go there when I visit my parents. They are the nicest family and it is a Joke that they are racist as they have been in business in a very multi racial city since 1890. The College was bully and got caught, there were signs all over the county that said "Support Gibsons" The community was behind the store. Last year a small group tried to protest in front of the store. Social media made a call to make a Cash run on the store . they were sold out in an Hour with so many customers.


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> because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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Posts: 8931 | Location: Wooster,Ohio | Registered: May 11, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Interesting financial info from:

https://www.insidehighered.com...-pushes-do-more-less


quote:
Like many other small private colleges, Oberlin faces challenging financial times ahead. In addition to structural deficits that could last several years if unaddressed, Ambar said, Oberlin is confronting the reality of smaller numbers of high school graduates in the Northeast that puts it at a distinct disadvantage, since unlike many larger colleges, it primarily serves traditional-age students.

The extra revenue from more liberal arts students can’t come fast enough. Last June, the board approved a $160 million budget that included a projected $4.7 million deficit. Without making cuts, the college’s deficit could have been as high as $9 million this year, an "unsustainable" figure that would hamper Oberlin's ability to offer financial aid "and to invest in our faculty, staff and campus," college officials said in an open letter to campus.

Ambar, along with Chris Canavan, Oberlin’s board chair, and Chesley Maddox-Dorsey, the vice chair, said the college last year raised enrollment. "But we’ve also had to contribute more financial aid, so the net revenue gain from improved enrollment has been modest. In other words, we are exhausting our pricing power," they wrote.

For new students, fall 2019 tuition and fees, along with room and board, are expected to be $73,694.

Raising tuition, they said, "only increases the demand for financial aid. It also adds to the financial strains on our students and their families, making it harder for us to keep them at Oberlin from the day they matriculate to the day they graduate. This weighs heavily on Oberlin’s finances."

The college has said that if it doesn’t trim expenses, Oberlin’s deficit could reach $162 million within a decade. It relies on net student income for 83 percent of operating revenue.

In its most recent audited financial statement, Oberlin said 97 employees took voluntary buyouts in 2016, with another 17 in 2018. It reported $184 million of outstanding bonded debt.

With an $887.4 million endowment last year, 186-year-old Oberlin is wealthier than most small private institutions, but far behind its wealthier peers -- colleges like Amherst, Swarthmore and Wellesley all reported endowments at or near $2 billion. For the past few years, Oberlin has drawn about 5 percent of its endowment for operating expenses, a standard distribution. Last year, that amounted to about $44.1 million.

In a widely circulated October 2017 letter, Canavan, the board chair, said a group of trustees examining the college’s finances concluded that “we lean too heavily on cash from generosity (past and present gifts, and borrowing against future gifts) and not enough on cash from operations (tuition, room and board).”




...let him who has no sword sell his robe and buy one. Luke 22:35-36 NAV

"Behold, I send you out as sheep in the midst of wolves; so be shrewd as serpents and innocent as doves." Matthew 10:16 NASV
 
Posts: 3529 | Location: Valley, Oregon | Registered: June 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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888 million dollar endowment in just one year with a 160 million dollar a year budget and they charge each student $73,000+ dollars a year? Somebody in the bean counting business must be happy.....

Reminds me of a number of years ago a good friends son was graduating from one of those elitist colleges and he was pissed because the best job offer he got was for only a starting salary of somethng like 85,000 a year while his girl friend who was also graduating had and offer for 120,000 a year. Somedays I think we need to get out one of those head choppers the French used a while back.
 
Posts: 938 | Location: Greenville, SC | Registered: January 30, 2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by craigcpa:

Trust but verify, my man. Trust but verify.


I've looked and can't find anything at all about this. I suffer from being related to an Oberlin grad. I would love be able to toss this in her lap...

Lowflash, no one is calling you out. It is well established around here to back up statements with links to articles. That way we can research and make informed decisions of our own.

If at any point you remember the name of the book please let me/us know

Thanks
 
Posts: 4647 | Location: middle Tennessee | Registered: October 28, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
I've looked and can't find anything at all about this. I suffer from being related to an Oberlin grad. I would love be able to toss this in her lap.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Tell her to ring up Lena Dunham. She would know.
 
Posts: 6211 | Location: MS GULF COAST | Registered: January 02, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Bad dog!
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It gets better. Lexington Insurance Company, which insures Oberlin for liability, says their policy doesn't cover the huge verdict against them. Keep in mind, there is another suit that could add $22 million to the $11 million. A few million here, a few million there, pretty soon you are talking real money....

Oberlin can sue for reimbursement, but that is just more headache and money that might well turn up nothing.

I wonder if they would have been such enthusiastic social justice warriors-- against this small, family business-- if they knew it was going to cost them 33 million smackeroos. To paraphrase from the article linked, Oberlin has a real mess on its hands. Big Grin

https://www.americanthinker.co...t_against_them_.html


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Posts: 10794 | Location: pennsylvania | Registered: June 05, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I hope that Oberlin files an appeal and pisses of the Judge so much that he ups the settlement amount to 500 Million dollars. Yeah, I know the Judge probably doesn't have the power to do something like this but one can hope.


I've stopped counting.
 
Posts: 4327 | Location: Michigan | Registered: November 07, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The reality is I'm not surprised at the actions of the students. I remember what I was like back at that age in college and all knowing and high and mighty. But the law suit is justly against the administration which promoted and encouraged the actions of the students.... you would think intelligent adults in a position of power and responsibility would have known better.
 
Posts: 938 | Location: Greenville, SC | Registered: January 30, 2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by lowflash:
I was there during that time period at Chu-Lai and the incident was known by word of mouth. I don't tell lies and I'm not a liar. USMC 64-68 Viet-Nam 65-66. I have no reason to lie or make up stories. You are free to believe what you want!


Inquiring about the source of a war story isn’t an accusation that you aren’t telling the truth of what you recall. The question is whether the original tale was true.

Just a few weeks ago at the Denver area VA hospital I heard a man with a SEAL trident insignia on his hat loudly regaling another vet with stories of his service in Vietnam. One thing he mentioned was that he carried a “.357 Magnum Smith and Wesson” loaded with ammunition that had uranium bullets. And he also had the “full kit” for the gun including interchangeable barrels up to 12 inches in length.

Am I telling the truth that that’s the story I heard? Yes.
Was that man telling the truth about a gun and ammunition he had in Vietnam? Pretty unlikely (if not ridiculously impossible), and I would require more evidence than a waiting room tale before I would believe it.

There are, BTW, countless other bizarre stories and claims that have come out of the Vietnam War. When someone asks for proof of an unlikely story, that’s simply being prudent.




“ Enlightenment is man’s emergence from his self-imposed nonage [immaturity]. Nonage is the inability to use one’s own understanding without another’s guidance. This nonage is self-imposed if its cause lies not in lack of understanding but in indecision and lack of courage to use one’s own mind without another’s guidance.”
— Immanuel Kant
 
Posts: 40124 | Location: 10,150 Feet Above Sea Level in Colorado | Registered: April 04, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by sigfreund:
quote:
Originally posted by lowflash:
I was there during that time period at Chu-Lai and the incident was known by word of mouth. I don't tell lies and I'm not a liar. USMC 64-68 Viet-Nam 65-66. I have no reason to lie or make up stories. You are free to believe what you want!


Inquiring about the source of a war story isn’t an accusation that you aren’t telling the truth of what you recall. The question is whether the original tale was true.

Just a few weeks ago at the Denver area VA hospital I heard a man with a SEAL trident insignia on his hat loudly regaling another vet with stories of his service in Vietnam. One thing he mentioned was that he carried a “.357 Magnum Smith and Wesson” loaded with ammunition that had uranium bullets. And he also had the “full kit” for the gun including interchangeable barrels up to 12 inches in length.

Am I telling the truth that that’s the story I heard? Yes.
Was that man telling the truth about a gun and ammunition he had in Vietnam? Pretty unlikely (if not ridiculously impossible), and I would require more evidence than a waiting room tale before I would believe it.

There are, BTW, countless other bizarre stories and claims that have come out of the Vietnam War. When someone asks for proof of an unlikely story, that’s simply being prudent.


The incident of the ambush was in the same area that Operation Starlite Occurred at later date. Thus the area was saturated with elements of the 1st Viet-Cong Regiment along with field fortifications where the ambush took place by a recon patrol of what I previously wrote. This is not some wild eyed war story. Years later I read a book (can't recall the title at this point, life would simpler if I could) confirmed the details of what I wrote. The author officer in reference was Recon officer thus believable. This is my last communication on this subject!!!!!!!!!
 
Posts: 892 | Registered: October 09, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Blume9mm:
888 million dollar endowment in just one year with a 160 million dollar a year budget and they charge each student $73,000+ dollars a year? Somebody in the bean counting business must be happy.....

Reminds me of a number of years ago a good friends son was graduating from one of those elitist colleges and he was pissed because the best job offer he got was for only a starting salary of somethng like 85,000 a year while his girl friend who was also graduating had and offer for 120,000 a year. Somedays I think we need to get out one of those head choppers the French used a while back.

Are you clear on how endowments work? It is basically a pile of money that you invest and attempt to generate a higher rate of income than you spend so it continues to grow. In theory, you never invade the principal and only spend a portion of the income.

There are quasi-endowments where invasion of the principal is allowed, but a true endowment is not to be invaded. Endowments are not an “I’m one year” thing, they are an “in perpetuity” thing.
 
Posts: 4159 | Registered: February 23, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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An important perspective on the whole thing, the role of Title IX in matters like this.

This is from https://donsurber.blogspot.com...-oberlin-failed.html



Sunday, June 09, 2019
Title IX is why Oberlin failed


Oberlin College was a pioneer in race and sex equality. In 1835, it became the few colleges to enroll a black student. In 1837, it became one of the first to enroll women.

But from a 19th century leader in tolerance, it is now a citadel of bigotry that must to pay $11 million to a bakery that it discriminated against. You can thank the federal government for this transformation.

Specifically Title IX.

The law called for ending discrimination on college campuses. Certainly no one would disagree with that, and colleges went out of their way to bring in students of color and women.

By 1982 -- 10 years after its passage -- Title IX was obsolete. Women outnumbered men on college campuses and every school was integrated.

But mission accomplished are the two words dreaded in the bureaucracy because they end the mission.

With Title IX coordinators and their staffs on every college campus in America dependent on discrimination for their livelihoods, the bureaucracy looked for discrimination at every turn.

And with colleges dependent upon federal money, administrators made sure their Title IX coordinators were happy.

Which leads us to Oberlin's demise. It hired Meredith Raimondo in 2003 as one of the professors in the newly formed Department of Comparative American Studies.

It describes itself as, "Comparative American studies uses interdisciplinary perspectives to guide students in their study of social, political, economic, and cultural processes within the United States as well as the role of the nation in a global context."

Raimondo is not a bad person. In fact, she was a popular professor. What was bad was the curriculum. Instead of teaching students how to think for themselves, the courses taught students what to think and what to think was that every facet of American society is evil, racist and sexist.

After all, without discrimination, there is no need for Title IX coordinators and their staffs.

Professor Raimondo went where the real money is on campus: administration.

In 2014, she landed the Title IX coordinator job. Within two years, she was interim dean of students.

Four months later, she got a call that a black student was caught stealing a bottle of wine from Gibson's Bakery.

She immediately swung into action. Instead of apologizing and reprimanding the student, she launched into a boycott of Gibson's. The college dropped its doughnut order, which I imagine was akin to killing the bakery.

The truth was the student broke the law and the bakery was not racist.

But the need for discrimination on college campuses is much greater than the need for truth.

Now a jury has determined Oberlin smeared the bakery as racist. Jurors awarded the bakery $11 million. We shall see what the judges and the appellate courts do.

I don't see the establishment tolerating such insolence from a mere jury. How dare they hold Oberlin accountable.

But the real problem is Title IX. How do you defeat corruption that hides behind a good idea?

After we drain the swamp in Washington, how about cleaning up these little messes across the land? One bakery shop cannot do it alone.


______________________________________________________

"You get much farther with a kind word and a gun than with a kind word alone."
 
Posts: 10794 | Location: pennsylvania | Registered: June 05, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I think a lot of people outside of academics, have little knowledge of Title IX. Thank you for the clarification and added information.
 
Posts: 6211 | Location: MS GULF COAST | Registered: January 02, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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When I used to practice Aikido, I and others from our dojo in Louisville would travel to Oberlin a couple of times a year to attend Aikido seminars. (They had a long tradition of Aikido on campus.) We were always stunned at the detachment from reality exhibited by the student body - spoiled trust fund babies with extreme leftist ideologies.

When Aikido students from Oberlin would travel to other dojos, it was always a problem because they would never clean up after themselves or replace anything they used.

Michelle Malkin graduated from Oberlin, and I cannot imagine how she made it out alive, let alone with some semblance of sanity.

I am so happy for the bakery.


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"Sooner or later, wherever people go, there's the law. And sooner or later, they find out that God's already been there." -- John Wayne as Chisum
 
Posts: 553 | Registered: September 20, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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There is a B&B we like near Oberlin. We are going again in August. I am making a point on visiting Gibson's and making a purchase.


When you're dead, you don't know you're dead. The pain is only felt by others. The same thing happens when you're stupid.
 
Posts: 3587 | Location: Ohio | Registered: December 27, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Bad dog!
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You can order candy and cookies online from them-- and tee shirts too. If you go to their home page, you will see, in HUGE CAPS "THANK YOU FOR ALL THE KIND WORDS OF SUPPORT."

https://www.gibsonsbakeryandcandy.com

No matter what the ultimate financial outcome, Oberlin College has a big black eye. Bullies with a big black eye. (It's not the look bullies want.)

They behaved like real scumbags toward this family bakery, and everyone (except the elites at the college itself with their heads up their asses) knows it.

A good article about the "blinding, dysfunctional arrogance of Oberlin College."

https://www.americanthinker.co...dict_against_it.html

This message has been edited. Last edited by: justjoe,


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Posts: 10794 | Location: pennsylvania | Registered: June 05, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Some interesting tidbits from some professors at Oberlin as well as townspeople, about whom we have heard very little. Notice Tita Reed's response at the very end of the quoted material. I wonder if her head is still up her ass?

Tomorrow punitive damages will be announced. I hope the jury hits them with the maximum of $22 million.

"In depositions taken last year, but were not seen by the jury, several professors and community leaders expressed their outrage at what happened.

Deposition from Robert Piron, retired professor of economics 1961 – 2007.

“I reached a conclusion that if you say a college had a mind, it was certainly out of its mind by now. It was the dumbest thing I have seen in years.

The thing that saddens me is that there are groups at Oberlin College now who are counseling prospective students about this affair. And as far as I am concerned, they are scandalously hurting the Gibson’s continually. It’s astoundingly cruel and dumb of the college. And I don’t think I will ever forgive them … I am furious, absolutely furious.

“They have taken wrong step after wrong step. And the level of sheer incompetence is beyond imagination now. And I know a lot of people who give money to this college are not going to do it [any more].

Deposition from Roy Usoku Ebihara, an optometrist in Oberlin since 1963, and given the “Distinguished Service Award for Community Service” by the school in 2017. He and his Japanese family were interred by the U.S. government during WWII.

“The college has no right to accuse people of being racist when the students are stealing things from our community merchants … We came to Oberlin because we saw a diversity in the community and wanted our kids to grow up in that type of environment.”

Having lived here for many years, we’ve had a good relationship with the administration … and we’ve been able to communicate, but I feel in recent years that’s been missing. They’re making decisions in our community in ways that are negative and I’m not happy with that.”

From Eric Gaines, longtime Oberlin resident, former air traffic controller and current Oberlin planning commission member.

“It was just like throwing gasoline on a fire … It’s out of the realm of rational thought.

So, the college thinks that the [shoplifting] kids should get a pass? … I can’t imagine a scenario in an institution of higher learning that would suggest we do that, because in a larger sense, that leads to anarchy, right?”

Roger Copeland, Oberlin College Professor of Theater and Dance for about 40 years, wrote a letter “Protest Suggests Misplaced Outrage” that was published in the school newspaper a week after the protests. He was mocked by the administration in their texts and emails for his views.

“I’ve known the Gibson family for many years and find it very difficult to believe that any of them would engage in the odious practice of racial profiling. I also know that their family-owned business has been hit hard by shoplifters in recent months, and based on newspaper accounts of the Oberlin Police Department’s investigation of this incident, I see no reason to suspect that Allyn Gibson is guilty of anything other than forcefully confronting a shoplifter. Furthermore, the timing of the protest (which began within 48 hours of Tuesday night’s disastrous election returns) suggests a classic case of misplaced outrage. As in: “The realization that Donald J. Trump will become our next President makes me so angry that I need to express my outrage immediately.”

A longtime Oberlin resident, Emily Crawford, who also worked in the school’s communications department, sent out an email to her bosses and then it was forwarded to senior members of the college’s administration. The email read:

“I have talked to 15 townie friends who are poc (persons of color) and they are disgusted and embarrassed by the protest. In their view, the kid was breaking the law, period (even if he wasn’t shoplifting, he was underage). To them this is not a race issue at all and they do not believe the Gibsons are racist. They believe the students have picked the wrong target … “I find this misdirected rage very disturbing, and it’s only going to widen the gap (between) town and gown.”

Tita Reed, special assistant to the president for community and government relations, wrote back: “Doesn’t change a damn thing for me.”

https://legalinsurrection.com/...-bakery-train-wreck/


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"You get much farther with a kind word and a gun than with a kind word alone."
 
Posts: 10794 | Location: pennsylvania | Registered: June 05, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
I'm Different!
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Oberlin sent a mass email criticizing the jurors that ruled for the bakery.

quote:
Publicly accusing jurors of disregarding “the clear evidence our team presented” when the trial is not over is another baffling move by Oberlin College.

As mentioned numerous times, “from the start of this case I have questioned the aggressive and demeaning attacks on the Gibsons as a defense strategy,” and “I’m still shaking my head at the tone-deafness of the defense in belittling this family business.” The jury seems to have agreed, rendering a combined $11.2 million compensatory damages verdict against Oberlin College and its Dean of Students, Meredith Raimondo.


The next stage is a punitive damages hearing, since the jury found the defendants acted with intent and malice. A separate punitive damages hearing is required under the Ohio Tort Reform legislation that passed several years ago. The point is to keep some of the more inflammatory evidence that does not go to liability or compensatory damages away from the jury during the initial deliberations. That additional evidence relevant to punitive damages could include information as to the wealth of the defendants, but also additional information supporting the need for punishment.

In this context, there is nothing more baffling than a statement sent to alumni after the verdict by Donica Thomas Varner, Oberlin College’s Vice President and General Counsel.

The statement was contained in a mass email sent to alumni (and possibly others) criticizing the jury verdict and repeating the same stale defenses that failed at trial:
quote:
Dear Members of the Oberlin Community:

I am writing to update you on the lawsuit that Gibson Bros., Inc. filed against Oberlin College and Vice President and Dean of Students Meredith Raimondo in the Lorain County Court of Common Pleas in November 2017.

Following a trial that spanned almost a full month, the jury found for the plaintiffs earlier today.

We are disappointed with the verdict and regret that the jury did not agree with the clear evidence our team presented.

Neither Oberlin College nor Dean Meredith Raimondo defamed a local business or its owners, and they never endorsed statements made by others. Rather, the College and Dr. Raimondo worked to ensure that students’ freedom of speech was protected and that the student demonstrations were safe and lawful, and they attempted to help the plaintiffs repair any harm caused by the student protests.

As we have stated, colleges cannot be held liable for the independent actions of their students. Institutions of higher education are obligated to protect freedom of speech on their campuses and respect their students’ decision to peacefully exercise their First Amendment rights. Oberlin College acted in accordance with these obligations.

While we are disappointed with the outcome, Oberlin College wishes to thank the members of the jury for their attention and dedication during this lengthy trial. They contributed a great deal of time and effort to this case, and we appreciate their commitment.

Our team will review the jury’s verdict and determine how to move forward.

Donica Thomas Varner
Vice President, General Counsel & Secretary


Procedurally, the email is baffling because the trial is not over. The jury will hear more evidence and render a verdict on punitive damages that could add another $22 million to the $11 million compensatory. The objective of any communications at this sensitive stage must be to first do no harm. That’s how Scott Wargo, Oberlin’s spokesman, handled it when contacted by me and other media after the verdict, indicating the college had no comment on the jury verdict. Wargo’s statement was the professional response one would expect in this circumstance, so why are others at the college not heeding that basic corporate communications strategy?

Substantively, the email is infuriating to anyone who has followed the case. Oberlin College and Raimondo were not “held liable for the independent actions of their students.” Rather, the defendants were held liable for their own conduct in aiding and abetting the publication of libelous documents, interference with business, and intentional infliction of emotional distress. Let me repeat, it was the college’s and Raimondo’s own conduct that was at issue before the jury. That the General Counsel of Oberlin College doesn’t understand that — even if she disagrees with the jury conclusion — tells me something went very wrong with the way this case was handled internally at Oberlin College.

Varner began serving as Oberlin College’s Acting General Counsel on June 5, 2017, and was appointed General Counsel in March 2018. Prior to that, she spent 15 years in the General Counsel’s Office at the University of Michigan. This means that while she was not at Oberlin College when the protests took place, she was General Counsel starting several months before the lawsuit was filed in November 2017. Given her position, she likely would have been the administrator at Oberlin College overseeing outside counsel’s handling of the case. Depending on what her role was in overseeing the failed litigation (effectively, she was the “client”), she may not be the best person to be involved in communications strategy post-verdict.

I saw this phenomenon when I was in private practice representing employees against securities firms, which usually had in-house counsel involved in termination decisions. When the in-house counsel who advised as to termination also showed up overseeing the litigation, I knew there were going to be problems because that person had an interest in defending his or her own termination advice, rather than providing a cold, disinterested litigation assessment.

We would have to know more about Varner’s involvement in overseeing the litigation. But if she was the key point person at the college as to the litigation strategy, she may not be the right person to handle corporate communications.

Someone with such deep experience as Varner should have known better than to send out such a statement in the middle of trial, particularly on the cusp of a punitive damages hearing. I understand the college felt the need to say something, but first do no harm. Simply send out a mass email, since alumni were going to hear about the verdict through the news, indicating that the college cannot comment since the trial is ongoing, and that more information will be provided after the trial is over. Or express a vague regret at the verdict and respect for the jurors.

But for heaven’s sake, don’t make things worse.

Don’t accuse the jurors of disregarding the “clear evidence,” don’t repeat the same failed claim that the college administrators were simply keeping the peace and protecting free speech when numerous witnesses testified otherwise, and don’t claim the college was held liable vicariously when in fact the college’s own conduct was at issue.

The post-verdict email could be Exhibit A at the punitive damages hearing as to why the compensatory damages are not sufficient to send a message to Oberlin College and its administrators. Whether it will be an exhibit we’ll find out on Tuesday.



“Agnostic, gun owning, conservative, college educated hillbilly”
 
Posts: 3987 | Location: Northern Panhandle WV | Registered: March 29, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I am curious as to the feelings of Oberlin alumni regarding this matter. The private University that I attended has a very active organization. They willing express their disagreements with the administration over many things.

Does anyone have some insight in this regard?
 
Posts: 6211 | Location: MS GULF COAST | Registered: January 02, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Bad dog!
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^^^
FWIW: https://www.theatlantic.com/no...-the-college/422004/

This doesn't deal with the specific case of Gibson's Bakery, but with the college's "activism" in general.

The administrators, most of the faculty, and most of the students at Oberlin College have been crybabies for a long time. Well off, pampered, arrogant snots. Best to ignore them.

But they went after a good family, so they could not be ignored. And like some court room movie, in the end the bad guys took it in the chops. Big Grin


______________________________________________________

"You get much farther with a kind word and a gun than with a kind word alone."
 
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