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Personally I wouldn't invest in a true 4 season tent unless I planned to use it regularly in the conditions it's designed for. Your described use sounds like a 3-4 season tent would work. Eureka makes good tents that would fit the bill. Mountain Hardwear used to have some tents on the smaller side that might work. I also have had pretty good luck with The North Face tents. I've owned a 4 season of both TNF and MH but it's been a few years since I bought a new one. All have 3-4 season tents that would work.

Get a better sleeping bag and wear a good hat! Keeping your head warm makes a big difference camping in cold weather.
 
Posts: 5512 | Location: CO | Registered: October 11, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Lighten up and laugh
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quote:
Originally posted by bigeinkcmo:
Personally I wouldn't invest in a true 4 season tent unless I planned to use it regularly in the conditions it's designed for. Your described use sounds like a 3-4 season tent would work. Eureka makes good tents that would fit the bill. Mountain Hardwear used to have some tents on the smaller side that might work. I also have had pretty good luck with The North Face tents. I've owned a 4 season of both TNF and MH but it's been a few years since I bought a new one. All have 3-4 season tents that would work.

Get a better sleeping bag and wear a good hat! Keeping your head warm makes a big difference camping in cold weather.


Thank you. 3-4 season it is.

Sleeping bags are next on my list. Keeping your head warm does make a big difference. Funny enough, the worst part for me is the inside of my nostrils getting cold. The rest of my body is fine, but that keeps me tossing all night.
 
Posts: 7466 | Registered: September 29, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I would again recommend Kodiak Canvas Z Top sleeping bag. I bought one this fall for sleeping in my ice fishing house and it has been the best and most comfortable sleeping bag I've ever slept in.



Kodiak Canvas sleeping bag


"Fixed fortifications are monuments to mans stupidity" - George S. Patton
 
Posts: 7242 | Location: Minnesota | Registered: June 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks, lastmanstanding! That is a wild looking design. I'll need one for a pack, but if I go car camping those would work.
 
Posts: 7466 | Registered: September 29, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I'd go and pick out a sleeping bag in person if you have a store nearby. I'm sleeping on a cot nowadays and it might be worth considering a nice Thermarest style pad/similar or a cot. Quite a few options out there. Ours are car camping bunk cots (disc-o-bed) for my family of four. Nice setup but heavy and bulky.
 
Posts: 5512 | Location: CO | Registered: October 11, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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As someone else said I would look at 3-4 season tents. True 4 season tents are expensive, heavy, and take a little more to set up.

I have two REI tents one maybe 5-6 years old and the other 3 years old or so. They may not be as strong as they were 20 years ago but they are as good as anything else out there.

Lots of tents are made with lighter material now especially backpacking tents. That material will never hold up like more heavy-duty stuff.

BTW there is never a do everything tent. I have about 4-5 laying around now although I really have just two I use. A backpacking one and a much larger and heavier one for car camping.


_____________________________________

Because in the end, you won’t remember the time you spent working in the office or mowing your lawn. Climb that goddamn mountain. Jack Kerouac
 
Posts: 15909 | Registered: March 27, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by bigeinkcmo:
I'd go and pick out a sleeping bag in person if you have a store nearby. I'm sleeping on a cot nowadays and it might be worth considering a nice Thermarest style pad/similar or a cot. Quite a few options out there. Ours are car camping bunk cots (disc-o-bed) for my family of four. Nice setup but heavy and bulky.

There sure are a ton of options. I'll get to sleeping bags soon, but want to get a new tent first. Thanks to you and everyone else for taking the time to reply.
 
Posts: 7466 | Registered: September 29, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I use a BA Flying 8 as a basecamp for group (5-6 adults) backcountry ski trips. It’s heavy but breaks down well into 4 packs. Looks complicated but is actually very easy to set up with 2 people. Plenty of space and great in every winter condition.

It’s a little overkill for summer but I’ve done a few car camping based family (2 adults, 3 kids) trips with it.


Presently on sale at REI-

https://www.rei.com/rei-garage...lying-diamond-8-tent


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Posts: 2652 | Location: VA, mostly | Registered: June 14, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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A good pad under the bag is an absolute must have. You’ll freeze without one.


----------The weather is here I wish you were beautiful----------
 
Posts: 4774 | Location: southern Mn | Registered: February 26, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by reflex/deflex 64:
A good pad under the bag is an absolute must have. You’ll freeze without one.


This is absolutely, 100% true.

If it is much below freezing, it really needs to be an insulated pad designed for cold weather, too.
 
Posts: 5545 | Location: TX | Registered: January 24, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Tents used in the winter are different than tents used for other seasons. Besides being able to withstand stiffer and more persistent winds, the amount of rain and the weight of snow loading all contribute to tents able to handle whatever weather its thrown at it. The flip=side, such tents are heavier because the fabrics used and the coatings are heavier, the pole-sets are bigger and the pole geometry is usually tighter, which means no windows.

If you can find it, TNF Northstar tent (4/6P) is a great all-around tent; its built like a 4-season tent but, without using the heavier materials or coatings. The idea behind the design was for 4-season durability without the weight; Alaskan guide services and remote research camps really like these tents as they easily load into bush planes. The geodesic design will shed all but the heaviest snow loads and it has a FULL rainfly. The 6P is my next purchase.

Marmot Limestone (4/6/8P) is a favorite, the heavy floor and large vestibule is nice. Haven't taken it into the snow but, winter camping is more about mitigating problems so, camp maintenance like snow shedding is a priority.

Spring 2021 inventory will be hitting stores in Feb/Mar so, hold your pennies until the new stuff comes out.
 
Posts: 10965 | Location: Wine Country | Registered: September 20, 2000Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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No personal experience, but, White Duck tents seem to get good reviews.
Rod
 
Posts: 1431 | Location: Between Rock & Hard Place (Pontiac & Detroit) | Registered: December 22, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks for the heads up, corsair. I'll be looking for deals on the old stuff until then. Maybe I'll get luck and catch one on clearance.
 
Posts: 7466 | Registered: September 29, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Sounds like you have settled on a 3 season tent and weight seems to be important... both would probably be above your budget unless you can find used but I would look at Seek Outside and Kifaru tipi’s. They are floorless, lightweight, US made, and more than capable of handling extreme weather. Bonus is you can add a lightweight titanium wood burning stove and be extremely comfortable in the harshest of weather as long as you keep feeding it wood.


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Posts: 297 | Location: Unfortunately, Illinois | Registered: June 29, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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https://americanadventurist.co...ents/rtts-jpg.54408/

Hopefully this comes through..


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Posts: 4945 | Location: SML & OBX | Registered: February 19, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Serenity now!
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I've been considering a Springbar tent for a while. They should have a nice one in your price range, and they're made in the USA.
https://springbar.com/



Ladies and gentlemen, take my advice - pull down your pants and slide on the ice.
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Posts: 4626 | Location: Highland, UT | Registered: September 14, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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