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The Trump Presidency : Year II Login/Join 
Peace through
superior firepower
Picture of parabellum
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Well, since there was never anything to indict the President for...
 
Posts: 83852 | Registered: January 20, 2000Reply With QuoteReport This Post
wishing we
were congress
posted Hide Post
Mueller can still submit a report that could be used to impeach. Vote in November.
 
Posts: 11665 | Registered: July 21, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Peace through
superior firepower
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Screw Robert Mueller, right is his dishonest ass. He's not touching the President and he knows it. There is nothing to any of this.
 
Posts: 83852 | Registered: January 20, 2000Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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You know I may be a bit jaded about some things, and it can show in my thoughts and writings sometimes. This may be a bit tinfoil hat theory, but I trust Mueller about as much as I trust a fart after a hard week of partying in Mexico.

In my limited LEO experience, and all around knowledge. It is not illegal for law enforcement or prosecutors to lie to you. But most people think it is since any lies you tell can be prosecuted. It would not surprise me one bit for Mueller to pull a rope-a-dope type of move. say he is not going to try and indict, when his plan is to take this as far as he can. When this shit is over and everyone goes home, then I will believe that it is over.

I am so fed up with this witch hunt BS. I am ready for the gloves to come off and an investigation into possible sedition and treasonous acts against a legitimate government by the GDC are looked at seriously. You don't stomp this shit out, it is going to happen again and again. You do something legitimately criminal, then reap the consequences. But having this "Salem Witch Hunt" bullshit hysteria because you are all butt hurt because your shrew of a candidate couldn't close the deal. Then fuck you and hopefully go to jail for being a big asshole and a criminal asshole at that.



It's all about clean living. Just do the right thing, and karma will help with the rest.
 
Posts: 762 | Location: The Republic of Texas | Registered: April 11, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
The Velvet Voicebox
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Joey D from 5/14/18. Sorry for being late with this. Busy & on the move.




"All great things are simple, and many can be expressed in single words: freedom, justice, honor, duty, mercy, hope."

--Sir Winston Churchill

"The world is filled with violence. Because criminals carry guns, we decent law-abiding citizens should also have guns. Otherwise they will win and the decent people will lose."

--James Earl Jones



 
Posts: 6755 | Location: KCMO | Registered: August 31, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Bad dog!
Picture of justjoe
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Saying that they just can't indict a sitting president is better than coughing up the hairball of truth: they have absolutely nothing to indict him for. Nada. Zero. Roll Eyes


______________________________________________________

"You get much farther with a kind word and a gun than with a kind word alone."
 
Posts: 9960 | Location: pennsylvania | Registered: June 05, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Be not wise in
thine own eyes
Picture of kimber1911
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The Obama administration, FBI, DOJ, CIA, including all intelligence agencies knew of Russian meddling with the election.

They strategically did not take any action because they thought Hillary was going to win, and did not want to taint her Presidency.



"This American carnage stops right here and stops right now.”
Donald Trump (POTUS) Jan. 20th 2017

"ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ!" King Leonidas of Sparta
 
Posts: 2740 | Location: NC | Registered: December 05, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
I believe in the
principle of
Due Process
Picture of JALLEN
posted Hide Post
The DOJ Office of Legal Counsel memo on indicting a President is found here.




Luckily, I have enough willpower to control the driving ambition that rages within me.

When you had the votes, we did things your way. Now, we have the votes and you will be doing things our way. This lesson in political reality from Lyndon B. Johnson

"Some things are apparent. Where government moves in, community retreats, civil society disintegrates and our ability to control our own destiny atrophies. The result is: families under siege; war in the streets; unapologetic expropriation of property; the precipitous decline of the rule of law; the rapid rise of corruption; the loss of civility and the triumph of deceit. The result is a debased, debauched culture which finds moral depravity entertaining and virtue contemptible." - Justice Janice Rogers Brown
 
Posts: 47400 | Location: Texas hill country | Registered: July 04, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Coin Sniper
Picture of Rightwire
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Loved the news tonight. Trump made a 6 figure payment to his attorney for expenses in 2016 and it's immediately the smoking gun on the porn payment. Like his attorney doesn't rack up $$$ just in travel. Amazing how they can twist information.




343 - Never Forget

Its better to be Pavlov's dog than Schrodinger's cat

There are three types of mistakes; Those you learn from, those you suffer from, and those you don't survive.
 
Posts: 33971 | Location: Above the snow line in Michigan | Registered: May 21, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by sdy:
Mueller can still submit a report that could be used to impeach. Vote in November.

Remember that it takes 67 senators to successfully remove a sitting President.

This is why Pelosi is against impeachment. They don't have the votes and a failed impeachment is very damaging to them.
 
Posts: 1322 | Location: Austin TX | Registered: October 30, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Be not wise in
thine own eyes
Picture of kimber1911
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So who was the FBI spy in the Trump campaign?

Initials apparently are S.H.
since last two nights Sean Hannity has stated that he will be very familiar with the initials.



"This American carnage stops right here and stops right now.”
Donald Trump (POTUS) Jan. 20th 2017

"ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ!" King Leonidas of Sparta
 
Posts: 2740 | Location: NC | Registered: December 05, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
I believe in the
principle of
Due Process
Picture of JALLEN
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by kimber1911:
So who was the FBI spy in the Trump campaign?

Initials apparently are S.H.
since last two nights Sean Hannity has stated that he will be very familiar with the initials.


Stephan Halper is the likely suspect.

Link




Luckily, I have enough willpower to control the driving ambition that rages within me.

When you had the votes, we did things your way. Now, we have the votes and you will be doing things our way. This lesson in political reality from Lyndon B. Johnson

"Some things are apparent. Where government moves in, community retreats, civil society disintegrates and our ability to control our own destiny atrophies. The result is: families under siege; war in the streets; unapologetic expropriation of property; the precipitous decline of the rule of law; the rapid rise of corruption; the loss of civility and the triumph of deceit. The result is a debased, debauched culture which finds moral depravity entertaining and virtue contemptible." - Justice Janice Rogers Brown
 
Posts: 47400 | Location: Texas hill country | Registered: July 04, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
I believe in the
principle of
Due Process
Picture of JALLEN
posted Hide Post
The details of Papdopoulos’s offense is found here. Very interesting.

Link




Luckily, I have enough willpower to control the driving ambition that rages within me.

When you had the votes, we did things your way. Now, we have the votes and you will be doing things our way. This lesson in political reality from Lyndon B. Johnson

"Some things are apparent. Where government moves in, community retreats, civil society disintegrates and our ability to control our own destiny atrophies. The result is: families under siege; war in the streets; unapologetic expropriation of property; the precipitous decline of the rule of law; the rapid rise of corruption; the loss of civility and the triumph of deceit. The result is a debased, debauched culture which finds moral depravity entertaining and virtue contemptible." - Justice Janice Rogers Brown
 
Posts: 47400 | Location: Texas hill country | Registered: July 04, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
wishing we
were congress
posted Hide Post
a good write up on Stefan Halper here:

https://www.americanthinker.co..._trump_campaign.html

included was this "tidbit":



from:

https://www.fpds.gov/ezsearch/...e=awardfull&start=30

federal govt gave Halper $282,295 on 27 Sept 2016

then federal govt gave Halper $129,280 on 26 July 2017

the agency for each of these is DoD for India and China Econ Study

of course it is quite possible this is totally unrelated to the campaign events in the Sept 2016 time period. Guess he is a busy guy.
 
Posts: 11665 | Registered: July 21, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
10mm is The
Boom of Doom
Picture of Fenris
posted Hide Post
When questioned by the FBI, the only thing you should say is nothing other than maybe, "Lawyer" and "Fuck you."




The budget should be balanced, the Treasury should be refilled, public debt should be reduced, the arrogance of officialdom should be tempered and controlled, and the assistance to foreign lands should be curtailed lest Rome become bankrupt. People again must learn to work, instead of living on public assistance. ~ Cicero 55 BC

The Dhimocrats love America like ticks love a hound.
 
Posts: 16126 | Location: Northern Virginia | Registered: November 08, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
I believe in the
principle of
Due Process
Picture of JALLEN
posted Hide Post
10 Key Takeaways From The New York Times’ Error-Ridden Defense Of FBI Spying On Trump Campaign

It's reasonable to assume that much of the new information in the New York Times report relates to leakers' fears about information that will be coming out in the inspector general report.

Federalist
Mollie Hemingway

The New York Times published an article yesterday confirming the United States’ intelligence apparatus was used to spy on Donald Trump’s presidential campaign in 2016.

Here are a few quick takeaways.

1. FBI Officials Admit They Spied On Trump Campaign
The New York Times‘ story, headlined “Code Name Crossfire Hurricane: The Secret Origins of the Trump Investigation,” is a dry and gentle account of the FBI’s launch of extensive surveillance of affiliates of the Trump campaign. Whereas FBI officials and media enablers had previously downplayed claims that the Trump campaign had been surveiled, in this story we learn that it was more widespread than previously acknowledged:

The F.B.I. investigated four unidentified Trump campaign aides in those early months, congressional investigators revealed in February. The four men were Michael T. Flynn, Paul Manafort, Carter Page and Mr. Papadopoulos, current and former officials said…
The F.B.I. obtained phone records and other documents using national security letters — a secret type of subpoena — officials said. And at least one government informant met several times with Mr. Page and Mr. Papadopoulos, current and former officials said.
This is a stunning admission for those Americans worried that federal law enforcement and intelligence agencies might use their powers to surveil, leak against, and target Americans simply for their political views or affiliations. As Sean Davis wrote, “The most amazing aspect about this article is how blasé it is about the fact that the Obama admin was actively spying on four affiliates of a rival political campaign weeks before an election.”

The story says the FBI was worried that if it came out they were spying on Trump campaign it would “only reinforce his claims that the election was being rigged against him.” It is easy to understand how learning that the FBI was spying on one’s presidential campaign might reinforce claims of election-rigging.

2. Terrified About Looming Inspector General Report
People leak for a variety of reasons, including to inoculate themselves as much as they can. For example, only when the secret funders of Fusion GPS’s Russia-Trump-collusion dossier were about to be revealed was their identity leaked to friendly reporters in the Washington Post. In October of 2017 was it finally reported that the Clinton campaign and Democratic National Committee secretly paid for the Russia dossier, hiding the arrangement by funneling the money through a law firm.

The friendly reporters at the Washington Post wrote the story gently, full of reassuring quotes to downplay its significance. The information only came about because House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence Chairman Devin Nunes subpoenaed the bank records of Fusion GPS, over the objections of Democrats on the committee. Even in this Times story, Clinton’s secret funding was not mentioned.

Likewise, the admissions in this New York Times story are coming out now, years after selective leaks to compliant reporters, just before an inspector general report detailing some of these actions is slated to be released this month. In fact, the Wall Street Journal reported that people mentioned in the report are beginning to get previews of what it alleges. It’s reasonable to assume that much of the new information in the New York Times report relates to information that will be coming out in the inspector general report.

By working with friendly reporters, these leaking FBI officials can ensure the first story about their unprecedented spying on political opponents will downplay that spying and even attempt to justify it. Of note is the story’s claim that very few people even knew about the spying on the Trump campaign in 2016, which means the leakers for this story come from a relatively small pool of people.

3. Still No Evidence of Collusion With Russia
In paragraph 69 of the lengthy story, The New York Times takes itself to task for burying the lede in its October 31, 2016, story about the FBI not finding any proof of involvement with Russian election meddling.

The key fact of the article — that the F.B.I. had opened a broad investigation into possible links between the Russian government and the Trump campaign — was published in the 10th paragraph.
It is somewhat funny, then, to read what The New York Times buries in paragraph 70 of the story:

A year and a half later, no public evidence has surfaced connecting Mr. Trump’s advisers to the hacking or linking Mr. Trump himself to the Russian government’s disruptive efforts.
No evidence of collusion after two years of investigation with unlimited resources? You don’t say! What could that mean?

4. Four Trump Affiliates Spied On
Thanks to the work of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence and the Senate Judiciary Committee, Americans already learned that the FBI had secured a wiretap on Carter Page, a former Trump campaign official. That wiretap, which was renewed three times, was already controversial because it was secured in part through using the secretly funded opposition research document created by the Hillary Clinton campaign and Democratic National Committee. The secret court that grants the wiretap was not told about Hillary Clinton or the DNC when the government applied for the wiretap or its renewals.

Now we learn that it wasn’t just Page, but that the government was going after four campaign affiliates including the former campaign manager, the top foreign policy advisor, and a low-level advisor whose drunken claim supposedly launched the investigation into the campaign. The bureau says Trump’s top foreign policy advisor and future national security advisor — a published critic of Russia — was surveiled because he spoke at an event in Russia sponsored by Russia Today, a government-sponsored media outlet.

5. Wiretaps, National Security Letters, and At Least One Spy
The surveillance didn’t just include wiretaps, but also national security letters and at least one government informant to spy on the campaign.:

The F.B.I. obtained phone records and other documents using national security letters — a secret type of subpoena — officials said. And at least one government informant met several times with Mr. Page and Mr. Papadopoulos, current and former officials said. That has become a politically contentious point, with Mr. Trump’s allies questioning whether the F.B.I. was spying on the Trump campaign or trying to entrap campaign officials.
This paragraph is noteworthy for the way it describes spying on the campaign — “at least one government informant met several times with Mr. Page and Mr. Papadopoulos” — before suggesting that might not be spying. The definition of spying is to secretly collect information, so it’s not really in dispute whether a government informant fits the bill.

Despite two years of investigation and surveillance, none of these men have been charged with anything even approaching treasonous collusion with Russia to steal a U.S. election.

6. More Leaks About a Top-Secret Government Informant
The House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence recently subpoenaed information from the FBI and Department of Justice. They did not publicly reveal what information they sought, but the Department of Justice responded by claiming that they were being extorted by congressional oversight. Then they leaked that they couldn’t share the information because it would jeopardize the life of a government informant. They also waged a public relations battle against HPSCI Chairman Nunes and committee staff.

But far from holding the information close to the vest, the government has repeatedly leaked information about this informant, and even that it was information about an informant that was being sought by Congress. From leaks of personally identifying information to the Washington Post, we’ve learned that this source works with the FBI and CIA, and is a U.S. citizen.

In The New York Times, additional information about a government informant leaked, including that the source met with Papadopoulos and Page to collect information. The information on an alleged source in the Trump campaign is so sensitive they can’t give it to Congress, but they can leak it to friendly press outlets like the Post and Times. It’s an odd posture for the Justice Department to take.

It is unknown at this point whether the informants were specifically sent by a U.S. agency or global partner, or whether the sources voluntarily provided information to the U.S. government.

7. Ignorance of Basic Facts
One thing that is surprising about the story is how many errors it contains. The problems begin in the second sentence, which claims Peter Strzok and another FBI agent were sent to London. The New York Times reports that “[t]heir assignment, which has not been previously reported, was to meet the Australian ambassador, who had evidence that one of Donald J. Trump’s advisers knew in advance about Russian election meddling.”

Of course, it was previously reported that Strzok had a meeting with the Australian ambassador. He describes the embassy where the meeting took place as the longest continually staffed embassy in London. The ambassador was previously reported to have had some information about a Trump advisor saying he’d heard that Russia had Clinton’s emails.

Another New York Times error was the claim, repeated twice, that Page ‘had previously been recruited by Russian spies.’
It’s also inaccurate to say this was “election meddling,” necessarily. Clinton had deleted 30,000 emails that were housed on her private server even though she was being investigated for mishandling classified information. This could be viewed as destruction of evidence. She claimed the emails had to do with yoga.

FBI Director James Comey specifically downplayed for the public the bureau’s belief that foreign countries had access to these emails. There is no evidence that Russia or any other country had these emails, and they were not released during the campaign. To describe this legitimate national security threat as “election meddling” is insufficient to the very problem for which Clinton was being investigated.

The story claims, “News organizations did not publish Mr. Steele’s reports or reveal the F.B.I.’s interest in them until after Election Day.” That’s demonstrably untrue. Here’s an October 31, 2016, story headlined “A Veteran Spy Has Given the FBI Information Alleging a Russian Operation to Cultivate Donald Trump.” It is sourced entirely to Steele. In September, Yahoo News’ Michael Isikoff took a meeting with Steele then published “U.S. intel officials probe ties between Trump adviser and Kremlin” on September 23, 2016. That story was even used in the Foreign Intelligence Service Act application against Page.

The New York Times writes, “Crossfire Hurricane began exactly 100 days before the presidential election, but if agents were eager to investigate Mr. Trump’s campaign, as the president has suggested, the messages do not reveal it. ‘I cannot believe we are seriously looking at these allegations and the pervasive connections,’ Mr. Strzok wrote soon after returning from London.”

There are multiple problems with this claim. For one, Strzok wrote that text in all caps with obvious eagerness. As the Wall Street Journal noted months ago, “Mr. Strzok emphasized the seriousness with which he viewed the allegations in a message to Ms. Page on Aug. 11, just a few days before the ‘insurance’ text. ‘OMG I CANNOT BELIEVE WE ARE SERIOUSLY LOOKING AT THESE ALLEGATIONS AND THE PERVASIVE CONNECTIONS,’ he texted.”

For another, Strzok repeatedly talked about how important and time-sensitive he felt the investigation was. As Andrew McCarthy highlighted in his deep look at some of these texts, as Strzok prepared for his morning flight to London, he compared the investigations of Clinton and Trump by writing, “And damn this feels momentous. Because this matters. The other one did, too, but that was to ensure that we didn’t F something up. This matters because this MATTERS.”

Another New York Times error was the claim, repeated twice, that Page “had previously been recruited by Russian spies.” In fact, while Russian agents had tried to recruit him, they failed to do so, and Page spoke at length with the FBI about the attempt before the agents were arrested or kicked out of the country.

The New York Times falsely reported that “Mr. Comey met with Mr. Trump privately, revealing the Steele reports and warning that journalists had obtained them.” Comey has told multiple journalists that he specifically did not brief Trump on the Steele reports. He didn’t tell Trump there were reports, or who funded them. He didn’t tell him about the claims in the reports that the campaign was compromised. He only told him that there was a rumor Trump had paid prostitutes to urinate on a Moscow hotel bed that the Obamas had once slept in.

The story also repeats long-debunked claims about the Republican platform and Ukraine.

8. Insurance: How Does It Work?
The story reminds readers that Strzok once texted Page “I want to believe the path you threw out for consideration in Andy’s office — that there’s no way he gets elected, but I’m afraid we can’t take that risk. It’s like an insurance policy in the unlikely event you die before you’re 40.” The article says Trump thought this “insurance policy” referred to a plan to respond to the unlikely event of a Trump victory. It goes on:

But officials have told the inspector general something quite different. They said Ms. Page and others advocated a slower, circumspect pace, especially because polls predicted Mr. Trump’s defeat. They said that anything the F.B.I. did publicly would only give fodder to Mr. Trump’s claims on the campaign trail that the election was rigged.
Mr. Strzok countered that even if Mr. Trump’s chances of victory were low — like dying before 40 — the stakes were too high to justify inaction.
It’s worth asking whether reporters understand how insurance works. As reader Matt noted, “The fundament intent of Insurance is ‘Indemnification.’ Restoring back to original condition prior to loss. Trump was the peril, MSM the adjuster & his impeachment, the policy limits.”

The article’s repeated claims that the FBI didn’t think Trump would win do not counter the notion that an “insurance policy” investigation was in the extremely rare case he might win. People don’t insure their property against fire damage because they expect it to happen so much as they can’t afford to fix things if it does happen.

9. Eavesdropping, Not Spying, And Other Friendly Claims
The story could not be friendlier to the FBI sources who are admitting what they did against the Trump campaign. A few examples:

“[P]rosecutors obtained court approval to eavesdrop on Mr. Page,” The New York Times writes, making the wiretapped spying on an American citizen sound almost downright pleasant. When Comey briefs Trump only on the rumor about the prostitutes and urination, we’re told “he feared making this conversation a ‘J. Edgar Hoover-type situation,’ with the F.B.I. presenting embarrassing information to lord over a president-elect.” Reporters don’t ask, much less answer, why someone fearing a J. Edgar Hoover-type situation would go out of his way to create an extreme caricature of a J. Edgar Hoover situation.

The story also claimed, “they kept details from political appointees across the street at the Justice Department,” before using controversial political appointee Sally Yates to claim that there was nothing worrisome. In fact, the subtext of the entire story is that the FBI showed good judgment in its handling of the spying in 2016. Unfortunately, the on-the-record source used to substantiate this claim is Yates.

Yates, who was in the news for claiming with a straight face that she thought Flynn had committed a Logan Act violation, is quoted as saying, “Folks are very, very careful and serious about that [FISA] process. I don’t know of anything that gives me any concerns.” If Yates, who had to be fired for refusing to do her job under Trump, tells you things are on the up and up, apparently you can take it to the bank.

10. Affirms Fears of Politicized Intelligence
This New York Times story may have been designed to inoculate the FBI against revelations coming out of the inspector general report, but the net result was to affirm the fears of many Americans who are worried that the U.S. government’s law enforcement and intelligence agencies abused their powers to surveil and target Americans simply for their political views and affiliations. The gathered information has been leaked to media for years, leading to damaged reputations, and the launch of limitless probes, but not any reason to believe that Trump colluded with Russia to steal an election.

Link




Luckily, I have enough willpower to control the driving ambition that rages within me.

When you had the votes, we did things your way. Now, we have the votes and you will be doing things our way. This lesson in political reality from Lyndon B. Johnson

"Some things are apparent. Where government moves in, community retreats, civil society disintegrates and our ability to control our own destiny atrophies. The result is: families under siege; war in the streets; unapologetic expropriation of property; the precipitous decline of the rule of law; the rapid rise of corruption; the loss of civility and the triumph of deceit. The result is a debased, debauched culture which finds moral depravity entertaining and virtue contemptible." - Justice Janice Rogers Brown
 
Posts: 47400 | Location: Texas hill country | Registered: July 04, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
stupid beyond
all belief
Picture of Deqlyn
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For all you fast and furious fans. Records released to congress. Bought to get hot in that kitchen.


https://mobile.reuters.com/article/amp/idUSKCN1GJ2KH?



What man is a man that does not make the world better. -Balian of Ibelin

Only boring people get bored. - Ruth Burke
 
Posts: 8005 | Registered: September 13, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Pipe Smoker
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Very interesting post, JALLEN. The swamp is deep, and foul.




Cognition?
On.
 
Posts: 3382 | Location: San Diego | Registered: July 26, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
I believe in the
principle of
Due Process
Picture of JALLEN
posted Hide Post
I think the most relevant and damning document we have seen so far is that Papadopoulos indictment I posted the link to last night.

This is a statement of facts which the prosecution says is true, they can prove each and every event and statement.

If I read this correctly, Papadopoulos was there in London, fat, dumb, and happy, probably too proud of being accepted into the “Trump team.”

quote:
In truth and in fact, however, defendant PAPADOPOULOS learned he would be an advisor to the Campaign in early March, and met the professor on or about March 14, 2016; the professor only took interest in defendant PAPADOPOULOS because of his status with the Campaign; and the professor told defendant PAPADOPOULOS about the "thousands of emails" on or about April 26, 2016, when defendant PAPADOPOULOS had been a foreign policy adviser to the Campaign for over a month.


The professor was an informant, almost certainly, whose job it was to provide the information about “Clinton e-mails” to him, so the government could sit back and see what happened.

Now the next question is how did it happen that the Ruskies set up the meeting with Don, Jr. promising “dirt on Clinton.” Coincidence? Another set up?




Luckily, I have enough willpower to control the driving ambition that rages within me.

When you had the votes, we did things your way. Now, we have the votes and you will be doing things our way. This lesson in political reality from Lyndon B. Johnson

"Some things are apparent. Where government moves in, community retreats, civil society disintegrates and our ability to control our own destiny atrophies. The result is: families under siege; war in the streets; unapologetic expropriation of property; the precipitous decline of the rule of law; the rapid rise of corruption; the loss of civility and the triumph of deceit. The result is a debased, debauched culture which finds moral depravity entertaining and virtue contemptible." - Justice Janice Rogers Brown
 
Posts: 47400 | Location: Texas hill country | Registered: July 04, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
wishing we
were congress
posted Hide Post
quote:
Now the next question is how did it happen that the Ruskies set up the meeting with Don, Jr. promising “dirt on Clinton.” Coincidence? Another set up?


Glenn Simpson of Fusion was working w the female Russian lawyer on another case

Simpson met w the Russian lawyer the day before the mtg w Don Jr, the day of the mtg, and the day after the mtg.

Simpson testified that the Russian lawyer never mentioned she talked to Don Jr. Do you believe that ?

Sounds like a Fusion set up all the way.

***************

re the NYT article discussed above,

the article says the FBI agents were not looking forward to an investigation of the Trump administration. But the texts show Strzok was thrilled.

29 July 2016, Strzok starts talking about a new case. Up until then, at least from the texts that have been released, there isn’t any indication that Strzok or Page have heard of Steele’s first reports. (Steele briefed an FBI agent in London on 5 July 2016)

30 July 2016, Strzok: “f*cking conniving cheating savages. At statecraft, athletics, you name it. I’m glad I’m on Team USA” “Going back through acting DCM. All good, and asked him to keep quiet, but I think it’s likely he will inform main State and they may call over to see what’s going on.”

Speculation: Strzok has heard something about Russian collusion. Steele report ?

DCM = State Dept Deputy Chief of Mission.

Strzok is about to go to London on very short notice.

Strzok to Page: “And damn this feels momentous. Because this matters. The other one did, too, but that was to ensure we didn’t F something up. This matters because this MATTERS.”

I would say the “other one” was Clinton email investigation. They didn’t want to F up the Clinton campaign. “this matters” sounds like the dossier material.

From other reports, Strzok went to London on 2 Aug 2016.

2 Aug 2016, Page: “Good meeting ?”

Strzok reply blanked out

Page: “Whoa. Make sure you can lawfully protect what you sign. Just thinking about congress, foia, etc. I’m sure it’s fine, I just don’t know how protection of intel-type stuff works in that context.”

3 Aug 2016, Strzok: “So looking at this form, I think we need to consider the lines of what we disclose to DoJ. For example, the last stipulation notes we will not disclose the identities outside the FBI. I think we and they could live with that. And frankly, I think you might argue the unauthorized disclosure might reasonably be expected to cause exceptionally grave damage to US national security”

Exceptionally grave damage = TS

Strzok returns to U.S.

A meeting is set up with “the agency”.

4 Aug 2016 7:38pm , Strzok: “But instead they’ll fill the room to take notes on everything we say and also ensure that no one on their side says anything sensitive”

5 Aug 2016 11:37am, Strzok: “Went well, best we could have expected. Other than xxxxx quote “the White House is running this.” My answer, “well, maybe for you they are.””

***************

from the texts it sounds like Strzok talked to more than one person on his London trip. Steele ? Stefan Halper ? Australian Downer ?

The FBI thought it was so earth shattering that Papadopoulos had heard the Russians had Clinton emails. Absurd

The news of Clinton's private server was broken in Mar 2015. 2015. Many people were talking about how her emails may have been hacked by the Russians or the Chinese.

Comey himself thought it was "reasonably likely" that hostile actors had gained access to the Clinton server.
 
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