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I just did a alb roast in the crockpot this weekend. Minced garlic rubbed on both sides. A dash of worcestershire sauce, and sprinkle of oregano. Filled the crockpot with 6-8 ounces of root beer. Set the temp on high for 30 minutes while turning the roast over at 15 minutes. This caramelizes the sugar into the roast. Turned the temp to low for another 6 1/2 hours.
 
Posts: 2013 | Location: Fitchburg, WI | Registered: March 24, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I do a pot-roast at least once a month and they come out fork tender and everyone loves them. I don't brown the roast first. I simply put the roast in the crock pot then goes in carrots and potatoes washed and cut into bite size chunks. I then dump two cans of Campbell's French onion soup over top of everything and then a few shakes of Montreal Steak Seasoning. Put the lid on and let it go all day on low (minimum of 8 hours).
 
Posts: 815 | Location: Oregon | Registered: September 25, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I had the same problem with my roast being a little tough. It definitely was not fall apart. I wonder if my crock pot it too hot on the low setting. I might have to layer a potato buffer or something elevated.

Does the specific cut of meat matter? I read chuck is best for pot roast.

I think roast beef and pot roast are different. I dont think roast beef is fall apart.


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Posts: 4091 | Location: Pittsburgh, PA, USA | Registered: February 27, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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This thread is making me hungry. I think I'll put my crockpot to work tomorrow.




 
Posts: 5682 | Location: Metro West, MA | Registered: March 28, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by gpbst3:
I had the same problem with my roast being a little tough. It definitely was not fall apart. I wonder if my crock pot it too hot on the low setting. I might have to layer a potato buffer or something elevated.

Does the specific cut of meat matter? I read chuck is best for pot roast.

I think roast beef and pot roast are different. I dont think roast beef is fall apart.


If it's tough either time or temp is off, I'd wager time. I sometimes start the crockpot when I l leave for work at 06:30 and it's perfect when I get home at 5:30 pm.
 
Posts: 815 | Location: Oregon | Registered: September 25, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by ryan81986:
This thread is making me hungry. I think I'll put my crockpot to work tomorrow.


Dude. Crock Pot ribs. That's where it's at. Bones come out of the meat so easily and look like you freakin' sanded and polished them.


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Posts: 9933 | Location: RI | Registered: October 08, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by jimmy123x:
Browning it first is what is making it tough.

Have her just cook it all day in the crock pot and it should come out fork tender.



There's nothing wrong with searing (and seasoning!) the chuck before placing in the crockpot, the crucial part is that there is adequate liquid, should be at least 2/3 up the side of the meat, and the temperature should be low and slow, like 8-10 hours on low. if there is not enough liquid, it's not going to braise properly and will dry out. 3-4 hours on high just won't work as well.

Technically this isn't even a "roast beef" but a "BRAISED beef". Roasting implies dry heat, not a dutch oven or crockpot.

quote:
Originally posted by jcat:

Dude. Crock Pot ribs. That's where it's at. Bones come out of the meat so easily and look like you freakin' sanded and polished them.


What! Sacrilege! Please. Ribs should be smoked, low and slow! MAYBE country ribs with some sauerkraut! Big Grin


 
Posts: 25199 | Location: Pennsylvania | Registered: November 12, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
In the yahd, not too
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quote:
Originally posted by jcat:
quote:
Originally posted by ryan81986:
This thread is making me hungry. I think I'll put my crockpot to work tomorrow.


Dude. Crock Pot ribs. That's where it's at. Bones come out of the meat so easily and look like you freakin' sanded and polished them.



Better yet, crock pot Jack Daniels pulled pork




 
Posts: 5682 | Location: Metro West, MA | Registered: March 28, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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where is she getting her meat?

that may make a difference .
there are good ,better and best meats,

This message has been edited. Last edited by: bendable,





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Posts: 48278 | Location: Henry County , Il | Registered: February 10, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by gpbst3:
I had the same problem with my roast being a little tough. It definitely was not fall apart. I wonder if my crock pot it too hot on the low setting. I might have to layer a potato buffer or something elevated.

Does the specific cut of meat matter? I read chuck is best for pot roast.

I think roast beef and pot roast are different. I dont think roast beef is fall apart.


Chuck roast and Sirloin are different cuts. Chuck roast has more fat and connective tissue to break down. Once it breaks down, (collagen?) it's very tender. A sirloin roast (very lean) is better for roasting.

Edit to add: you have to keep an eye on a sirloin roast. Treat it like a steak and pull it at about 135 ish degrees for medium keeping in mind it will cook as it rests.
 
Posts: 958 | Registered: October 07, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I had the same problem with my wife's. The butcher told her to try a bottom round instead and they have been great ever since.
 
Posts: 1313 | Registered: January 25, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by PASig:
quote:
Originally posted by jimmy123x:
Browning it first is what is making it tough.

Have her just cook it all day in the crock pot and it should come out fork tender.



There's nothing wrong with searing (and seasoning!) the chuck before placing in the crockpot, the crucial part is that there is adequate liquid, should be at least 2/3 up the side of the meat, and the temperature should be low and slow, like 8-10 hours on low. if there is not enough liquid, it's not going to braise properly and will dry out. 3-4 hours on high just won't work as well.

Technically this isn't even a "roast beef" but a "BRAISED beef". Roasting implies dry heat, not a dutch oven or crockpot.

quote:
Originally posted by jcat:

Dude. Crock Pot ribs. That's where it's at. Bones come out of the meat so easily and look like you freakin' sanded and polished them.


What! Sacrilege! Please. Ribs should be smoked, low and slow! MAYBE country ribs with some sauerkraut! Big Grin


PASig has it right. I have no idea why anyone would say not to brown it. That is actually important for all crock pot recipes as it provides a ton of flavor that would be lost otherwise. A quick hot sear isn't going to dry anything out. That's absurd. If it's tough it's not cooked enough and dry must be not enough liquid as others have mentioned. You need it cooked enough for the collagen to basically melt and the muscle to come apart easily.




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Posts: 10019 | Location: Westminster, MA | Registered: November 14, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by frayedends:
quote:
Originally posted by PASig:
quote:
Originally posted by jimmy123x:
Browning it first is what is making it tough.

Have her just cook it all day in the crock pot and it should come out fork tender.



There's nothing wrong with searing (and seasoning!) the chuck before placing in the crockpot, the crucial part is that there is adequate liquid, should be at least 2/3 up the side of the meat, and the temperature should be low and slow, like 8-10 hours on low. if there is not enough liquid, it's not going to braise properly and will dry out. 3-4 hours on high just won't work as well.

Technically this isn't even a "roast beef" but a "BRAISED beef". Roasting implies dry heat, not a dutch oven or crockpot.

quote:
Originally posted by jcat:

Dude. Crock Pot ribs. That's where it's at. Bones come out of the meat so easily and look like you freakin' sanded and polished them.


What! Sacrilege! Please. Ribs should be smoked, low and slow! MAYBE country ribs with some sauerkraut! Big Grin


PASig has it right. I have no idea why anyone would say not to brown it. That is actually important for all crock pot recipes as it provides a ton of flavor that would be lost otherwise. A quick hot sear isn't going to dry anything out. That's absurd. If it's tough it's not cooked enough and dry must be not enough liquid as others have mentioned. You need it cooked enough for the collagen to basically melt and the muscle to come apart easily.


I'll second that. Also if you do a light flour coating when you sear it, it helps to make the juices more gravy like when it cooks.

Also jcat, what the heck are you thinking? Ribs in a crock pot? I rather go to chili's for ribs than that. Ribs are made to be smoked.



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Posts: 14264 | Location: Loudoun County, Virginia | Registered: December 27, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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There are two different cuts of beef called "Chuck" the "Chuck Roll" and the "Shoulder Clod".
The roll has lots of connective tissue and has fairly tender muscles in it. These break down when cooking and the roast falls apart when done properly.
The shoulder clod has 5 different muscles and is never as tender as the roll cut.
The Shoulder cuts are usually over $1.00 per pound less than the Roll.

If you want the best chuck roast ask the Butcher to cut you one from the chuck end, which is the part of the muscle taken from the end of the prime rib cut. These are the best, but you get one smaller one from every 20 lb. Chuck Roll.


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Posts: 2258 | Location: New Hampshire | Registered: November 29, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Agree, chuck roast is one of my favorites and it is always fall apart and juicy. Sear it and the fill pan with onion and broth and cook with the lid on. I must get lucky every time. Makes awesome brown gravy too.



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Posts: 1638 | Location: Kansas City, MO | Registered: November 28, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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You guys are great...Thanks for the all the suggestions. My wife will try some of them next week and I am sure she will reply to this thread tomorrow when she reads it.


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Posts: 1037 | Location: Little Rock, AR | Registered: January 22, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I disagree with the don't brown it suggestions. Browning adds flavor and shouldn't make it tough.

It sounds like she is not cooking it long enough for a lot of the connective tissue to break down. When you take leftovers out of the fridge the next day, is there gelatin solidified in the juices? If not then try cooking it longer.
 
Posts: 134 | Location: Southern Arizona | Registered: September 20, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by bendable:
where is she getting her meat?

that may make a difference .
there good ,better and best meats,


Leave it to bendable to bring in the innuendo Big Grin


And you guys that are knocking the crock pot ribs, you should really try it. It winds up being more like pulled pork than ribs, but dammit they're good.


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Posts: 9933 | Location: RI | Registered: October 08, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I sear mine - I usually use a chuck roast.

I don't use a crock pot, but a Dutch oven.

Sear it with salt and pepper. Add water and some wine - one cup of each, and check it halfway through to see if it needs more liquid. It should be okay, but some dutch ovens are tighter than others.

Add two celery stalks, cloves of garlic, an onion, and some herbs (whatever you like, basil, oregano, bay, thyme, rosemary, sage). Cook at 350 for 1.5 hours.

Add liquid if needed. Discard the original vegetable, they are just there to flavor the broth. Add potatoes, turnips. Cook for .5 hours. Add carrots and an onion, and cook for another 30 minutes, or until all the vegetables are tender. Don't overcook the vegetables.




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Posts: 47965 | Location: Texas | Registered: February 10, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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We put a roast in the Crock almost once a week.
My wife does not brown it first. She adds a little water and a some beef broth. We usually add carrots and potatoes the last 2 hours of so. It is always very tender.I had one on Sunday as a matter of fact. Maybe you are cooking it totally on high, or maybe the browning makes it tough.
We usually put it on high for about 3 hours and then low for the remainder of the time. She puts it on in the morning and it cooks all day.


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Posts: 2558 | Location: Ohio | Registered: December 18, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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