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Advice from SigForum for elderly dad's behavior... "creepy" factor... Login/Join 
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Picture of Jager
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One of the only good things about getting old is not having to care what comes out of your mouth.

I watched Grand Torino again yesterday. I really love that movie because of how much Clint's character reminds me of me.

Talk to your father. Ask him why he does what he does. Listen to him. Caution him if it's warranted. Be prepared to step back - or forward.
 
Posts: 2284 | Location: Phoenix, Arizona | Registered: October 30, 2000Reply With QuoteReport This Post
If the facts don't fit the theory, change the facts
Picture of GRIZZLYBEAR
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As far as some of the ages mentioned they are young'uns.

I am a in my late 70's served a few tours of duty in Nam, retired as a teamster with 20 plus year pension, retired from PA state adult corrections after 21 years with another pension, on social security and still working part time to keep busy (3 to 5 days weekly.

I have supported myself since I was 16 years old and never accepted or asked for a hand out in my life.

I have paid my dues to this world and don't give a shit about what is the accepted norms.
I do my thing and want to be left alone. My adult children know better than to try to correct my behavior; I raised them, supported them, and to this day if they need any type of help they come to old dad.
 
Posts: 1765 | Location: SOMEWHERE IN,, PA USA | Registered: May 08, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
thin skin can't win
Picture of Georgeair
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quote:
I watched Grand Torino again yesterday. I really love that movie because of how much Clint's character reminds me of me.


Speaking of people who's behavior changed with cancer.



You only have integrity once. - imprezaguy02

 
Posts: 9770 | Location: Madison, MS | Registered: December 10, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Only the strong survive
Picture of 41
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Dr. Axe's email today contained three articles on dementia:

8 Surprising Ways to Lower Your Dementia Risk

https://draxe.com/health/brain...ign=20190814_curated

15 Brain Foods to Boost Focus and Memory

https://draxe.com/nutrition/ar...ign=20190814_curated

9 Popular Drugs Linked to Dementia and Memory Loss

https://draxe.com/health/brain...ign=20190814_curated




41
 
Posts: 10187 | Location: Herndon, VA | Registered: June 11, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
His diet consists of black
coffee, and sarcasm.
Picture of egregore
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There is a much longer story behind it, but for our purposes, my dad developed paranoia from excessive medications and interactions between them. When he was taken (some required "weaning") off most of them he went back to pretty much his old self. Any possibility of this in yours?
 
Posts: 22272 | Location: Johnson City/Elizabethton, TN | Registered: April 28, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Only the strong survive
Picture of 41
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They did my father in by giving him grapefruit juice. It has an enzyme that makes the medications from 5 to 10 times the dose.

I left for two days to check my mail and pay some bills and when I got back he was in a coma and died two days later.

Grapefruit juice or grapefruits shouldn't even be on the premises. I had told a nurse several times but they ignored me.




41
 
Posts: 10187 | Location: Herndon, VA | Registered: June 11, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of hairy2dawg
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I remember going out to lunch with my boss and his father (92), when I was in my mid 20's. I kinda started giggling when I saw the old man looking up the cute waitresses. He looked over at me and said "What??? Old rats like cheese too".
 
Posts: 1133 | Location: Athens, GA | Registered: February 01, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
On the DL
Picture of V-Tail
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quote:
Originally posted by 41:

They did my father in by giving him grapefruit juice. It has an enzyme that makes the medications from 5 to 10 times the dose.

I left for two days to check my mail and pay some bills and when I got back he was in a coma and died two days later.

Grapefruit juice or grapefruits shouldn't even be on the premises. I had told a nurse several times but they ignored me.
I always liked a cold glass of grapefruit juice to start the day. When statins were prescribed for me for cholesterol, the pharmacist warned me that as of that moment, grapefruit was verboten. Orange juice is OK, but I don't find it as refreshing.



A mind is a terrible thing.
 
Posts: 21182 | Location: Central Florida (near Orlando) | Registered: January 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Rock Paper
Scissors
Lizard Spock
Picture of James in Denver
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quote:
Originally posted by egregore:
There is a much longer story behind it, but for our purposes, my dad developed paranoia from excessive medications and interactions between them. When he was taken (some required "weaning") off most of them he went back to pretty much his old self. Any possibility of this in yours?

I don't know all his meds, but I'll find out. This is a good suggestion (as are many in this thread). THANKS!!!

quote:
Originally posted by 41:
They did my father in by giving him grapefruit juice. It has an enzyme that makes the medications from 5 to 10 times the dose.

I don't THINK my dad likes grapefruit, but I do remember having it a lot as a kid so I'll check on this. I don't think he's on statins, but he might be based on other things.

A thorough review of his meds and his diet appears to be a MUST!!! THANKS!!!

James in Denver


----------------------------
Robert Heinlein – Starship Troopers – Chapter 2
“Violence, naked force has settled more issues in history than has any other factor. And the contrary opinion is wishful thinking at its worst.
Breeds that forget this basic truth have always paid for it with their lives … and freedoms.”
 
Posts: 4412 | Location: Colorado | Registered: August 24, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Vi Veri Veniversum Vivus Vici
Picture of ChuckFinley
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Full consultation with an internist or geriatrician including MRI of brain.

Exclude medications, interactions, brain tumors, Picks disease etc.

Don't play around with supplements without direct medical advice or advice from people who make money peddling promises.

If all checks out fine and he just likes his new attitude then you have an additional choice but the odds of an actual cause for this are too high to rely on an internet board for management.




_________________________
NRA Endowment Member
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"Of all tyrannies, a tyranny exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive. It may be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies. The robber baron's cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated; but those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end, for they do so with the approval of their own conscience." -- C.S. Lewis
 
Posts: 4802 | Location: District 12 | Registered: June 16, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Coin Sniper
Picture of Rightwire
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My $0.02

Your father is 85, has diagnosed Parkinson and likely some other things starting. Two perspectives on this situation

Yours:
You see your dad as an older version of who he's always been. But inside, he isn't who he has always been. He's changing and it seems like one of the things that goes first is that social filter. That's always been in there, as it likely is with most of us, but our filter stops it. His filter is weakening but he doesn't realize it. Tell him doesn't help because he can't process it like he used to in years past.

It was like the little old man in the rest home where my grandmother was whose wife had died years ago. But he kept trying to escape to go take her to dinner. His family kept explaining that she was dead, and he would get all upset thinking it had just happened. Ten minutes later he'd be back to trying to take her to dinner. y girlfriend had to counsel them a bit as they were just upsetting him for no reason. It won't sink in. Likewise what you're saying to him probably isn't sinking in either

Care Giver perspective:
This sort of goes with the territory. Back in my Fire Service days we had some frequent fliers, often just lonely. Some of the elderly ladies loved the 'Fireman visits' and I had some pretty open evaluations of my physique and a few butt grabs. You take it in stride, realize the mental capacity is reduced, have a little fun with it and move on with your day. Likely the people your dad is interacting with are doing the same and unless something he said was REALLY funny, forget about it as soon as they've left the room.




343 - Never Forget

Its better to be Pavlov's dog than Schrodinger's cat

There are three types of mistakes; Those you learn from, those you suffer from, and those you don't survive.
 
Posts: 34860 | Location: Above the snow line in Michigan | Registered: May 21, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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