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Sigform yearly automobile battery recommedation thread: Version 2019 Login/Join 
St. Vitus
Dance Instructor
Picture of blueye
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I am one of those that care about ease of warranty. When I moved to Texas in 1990, I had a Western Auto battery that I bought in Michigan. 2 years later it crapped out so I went to the local WA for warranty. Sorry that was a company store and we are a franchise,cannot warranty it. Went with Wallyworld and never looked back. If I go to Florida and battery goes, they will cover it.
 
Posts: 4697 | Location: basement | Registered: April 06, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by sgalczyn:
quote:
Originally posted by jimmy123x:

I can tell you from my experience, they're no better than the equivalent Deka AGM, which is good to very good, but not great. I'm seeing 3 years +/- out of them......On one boat the first set went 6.5 years, same boat, same replacement batteries and they were bad 39 months later.


Running a Deka AGM in my Forester 6 years now.........going strong.


Heat is not Deka's friend. Down here in Sunny South Florida, we see about 3.5 years out of them in a car.....Also Deka you have to warranty it at the distributor or dealer you bought it from.
 
Posts: 18371 | Registered: June 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
His diet consists of black
coffee, and sarcasm.
Picture of egregore
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Interstate, but I have a little bit of bias. I work in a repair shop, this is the brand they carry and I get it for barely over cost.

Barring a sudden failure, I don't wait for my batteries to go dead before I replace them. I test them periodically as well as listen for any hint of slow cranking. The latest - a 5-year-old Interstate - started to exhibit symptoms. I tested it and it showed 380 CCA out of a rating of 550. This is still enough to start my little 1.8-liter engine, but I get single-digit temperatures sometimes, so out it went.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: egregore,
 
Posts: 22882 | Location: Johnson City/Elizabethton, TN | Registered: April 28, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Giftedly Outspoken
Picture of sigarms229
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I went on youtube today and one of my favorite posters just put up a video about this very topic.

If you don't watch his channel you should give it a try.

https://youtu.be/h7rTcBanpMk




Sometimes, you gotta roll the hard six
 
Posts: 3726 | Location: SouthCentral PA | Registered: December 05, 1999Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Live for today.
Tomorrow will
cost more
Picture of motor59
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Timely thread... my wife's 2014 Honda CR-V failed to start yesterday and again this morning.
Went to Costco and replaced the original Honda battery with a $75 Interstate.




There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who, when presented with a glass that is exactly half full, say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!
 
Posts: 2632 | Location: Exit 7 | Registered: March 21, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by sigarms229:
I went on youtube today and one of my favorite posters just put up a video about this very topic.

If you don't watch his channel you should give it a try.



Already posted on page three. Another thing about PF’s video: He compares different group size batteries and considers surface charge as fully charged. Can’t make a fair comparison doing that, especially with a cheap load tester.


—————————
Indefatigably succinct.
 
Posts: 1627 | Location: Northeast Georgia | Registered: November 18, 2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of sigmoid
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This thread got me thinking about my 2013 F150 and how time flies.
I stopped at Wally World and bought a Maxx Ever Start 65N $100.00 OTD!
Original was Motorcraft and after 6+ years I believe it was worth the c-note.
Timely topic indeed.
Gets cold here in Idaho!
Thanks


__________________________________________________
-Whenever I’m frustrated at my job I remember, Hilliary Clinton has a gynecologist
 
Posts: 980 | Location: Idaho | Registered: July 07, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Peace through
superior firepower
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I trust Interstate
 
Posts: 89135 | Registered: January 20, 2000Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Too clever by half
Picture of jigray3
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Most likely the alternator in your car is designed to charge at the correct voltage for standard wet cell batteries. If so, you should stick with the same type.

AGM batteries require a different charging voltage for best performance and longevity. There is a ton of good info detailing the specifics, but suffice to say quality smart battery chargers have different settings for AGM vs traditional wet cell batteries for a very good reason.




"We have a system that increasingly taxes work, and increasingly subsidizes non-work" - Milton Friedman
 
Posts: 10147 | Location: Richmond, VA | Registered: December 11, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Stangosaurus Rex
Picture of Tommydogg
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I was looking at a AGM 65 at Sam's club the other day. It was a Energizer battery, any thoughts?


___________________________
"I Get It Now"

Beth Greene
 
Posts: 7770 | Location: South Florida | Registered: January 09, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of Jimbo Jones
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This.

Used to be a fan of Walmart / EverMaxx but switched since I started shopping at Costco (food, tires, gas....they get a lot of my money).

quote:
Originally posted by Oz_Shadow:
I just get an Interstate at Costco. Good prices and they last as long as any.


---------------------------------------
It's like my brain's a tree and you're those little cookie elves.
 
Posts: 2059 | Location: Cary, NC | Registered: February 26, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Savor the limelight
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by jigray3:
Most likely the alternator in your car is designed to charge at the correct voltage for standard wet cell batteries. If so, you should stick with the same type.

AGM batteries require a different charging voltage for best performance and longevity. There is a ton of good info detailing the specifics, but suffice to say quality smart battery chargers have different settings for AGM vs traditional wet cell batteries for a very good reason.


My understanding is that AGM batteries, which share the same chemistry as regular wet cell batteries, can take more current in the absorption phase of the charge cycle with out boiling like a standard battery would do. Using a charger or charging system designed for a standard battery would charge slower than the AGM is capable of, but would not have a detrimental effect on the battery itself.

Gel cell batteries on the other hand are a different chemistry and require a lower voltage, 13.6?, than the 14+ a standard charging system puts out.
 
Posts: 5281 | Location: SWFL | Registered: October 10, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by jigray3:
Most likely the alternator in your car is designed to charge at the correct voltage for standard wet cell batteries. If so, you should stick with the same type.

AGM batteries require a different charging voltage for best performance and longevity. There is a ton of good info detailing the specifics, but suffice to say quality smart battery chargers have different settings for AGM vs traditional wet cell batteries for a very good reason.


AGM's take the same charging profile as wet cells. Using a regular alternator or battery charger does not harm them at all. Most all smart battery chargers do not have a separate setting for AGM anymore. All yachts live off of the battery chargers (and RV's) and have very expensive ($500-$4000) and large battery chargers (50-100 amp) and they only have a separate setting for Gel Gel batteries require a lower charging voltage and have a lower resting voltage.
 
Posts: 18371 | Registered: June 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Too clever by half
Picture of jigray3
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by jimmy123x:
quote:
Originally posted by jigray3:
Most likely the alternator in your car is designed to charge at the correct voltage for standard wet cell batteries. If so, you should stick with the same type.

AGM batteries require a different charging voltage for best performance and longevity. There is a ton of good info detailing the specifics, but suffice to say quality smart battery chargers have different settings for AGM vs traditional wet cell batteries for a very good reason.


AGM's take the same charging profile as wet cells. Using a regular alternator or battery charger does not harm them at all. Most all smart battery chargers do not have a separate setting for AGM anymore. All yachts live off of the battery chargers (and RV's) and have very expensive ($500-$4000) and large battery chargers (50-100 amp) and they only have a separate setting for Gel Gel batteries require a lower charging voltage and have a lower resting voltage.


There is a significant body of evidence from reputable sources that contradicts your position. Here is one example::.

"As with all gelled and sealed units, AGM batteries are sensitive to overcharging. A charge to 2.40V/cell (and higher) is fine; however, the float charge should be reduced to between 2.25 and 2.30V/cell (summer temperatures may require lower voltages). Automotive charging systems for flooded lead acid often have a fixed float voltage setting of 14.40V (2.40V/cell); a direct replacement with a sealed unit could overcharge the battery on a long drive. (See BU-403: Charging Lead Acid.)

AGM and other sealed batteries do not like heat and should be installed away from the engine compartment. Manufacturers recommend halting charge if the battery core reaches 49°C (120°F). Table 1 spells out the advantages and limitations of AGM."

Link




"We have a system that increasingly taxes work, and increasingly subsidizes non-work" - Milton Friedman
 
Posts: 10147 | Location: Richmond, VA | Registered: December 11, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Victim of Life's
Circumstances
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Rural King is my nearest store and they are usually lowest price with good warranties.



Support your own damn self and leave me the hell alone - Kurt Schlichter's Red, White And Blue New Deal
 
Posts: 3193 | Location: Sunnyside of Louisville | Registered: July 04, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by jigray3:
quote:
Originally posted by jimmy123x:
quote:
Originally posted by jigray3:
Most likely the alternator in your car is designed to charge at the correct voltage for standard wet cell batteries. If so, you should stick with the same type.

AGM batteries require a different charging voltage for best performance and longevity. There is a ton of good info detailing the specifics, but suffice to say quality smart battery chargers have different settings for AGM vs traditional wet cell batteries for a very good reason.


AGM's take the same charging profile as wet cells. Using a regular alternator or battery charger does not harm them at all. Most all smart battery chargers do not have a separate setting for AGM anymore. All yachts live off of the battery chargers (and RV's) and have very expensive ($500-$4000) and large battery chargers (50-100 amp) and they only have a separate setting for Gel Gel batteries require a lower charging voltage and have a lower resting voltage.


There is a significant body of evidence from reputable sources that contradicts your position. Here is one example::.

"As with all gelled and sealed units, AGM batteries are sensitive to overcharging. A charge to 2.40V/cell (and higher) is fine; however, the float charge should be reduced to between 2.25 and 2.30V/cell (summer temperatures may require lower voltages). Automotive charging systems for flooded lead acid often have a fixed float voltage setting of 14.40V (2.40V/cell); a direct replacement with a sealed unit could overcharge the battery on a long drive. (See BU-403: Charging Lead Acid.)

AGM and other sealed batteries do not like heat and should be installed away from the engine compartment. Manufacturers recommend halting charge if the battery core reaches 49°C (120°F). Table 1 spells out the advantages and limitations of AGM."

Link


The charging profiles AND resting profiles for both traditional lead acid and AGM are virtually identical. A flooded battery can be overcharged on a very long drive just the same as AGM, as resting (fully charged) voltage is around 13.5-13.6 volts for both types (there is a little fluctuation on resting voltage depending on ambient temperature for all batteries). GEL batteries have much lower charging and flooded voltages, but generally since they're around 250% more expensive than flooded, you generally only see them in inverter battery banks and things of that nature

Straight from East Penn (DEKA's) website:

AGM batteries will replace a flooded battery in any typical alternator voltage regulated system. These systems generally maintain a voltage at 13.8 to 14.4 volts (cars, trucks, commercial trucks, boats, etc.). In fact, the efficient recharging of the AGM battery design can cause less wear on the vehicle’s alternator system over time.

https://www.eastpennmanufactur...rces-downloads/faqs/

ROLLS battery- one of the best batteries made, recommends 14.55 volt charge voltage, and 13.65 float voltage if air temp is 86F for AGM AND 14.55 volt charge voltage and 13.55 Float voltage at 86F air temp for their flooded batteries.


support.rollsbattery.com/support/solutions/articles/4345-agm-charging

http://support.rollsbattery.co...-lead-acid-batteries

I am a dealer of Deka batteries BTW, but get most all of the brands of batteries at wholesale prices with my business.
 
Posts: 18371 | Registered: June 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Republican in training
Picture of DonDraper
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OOOh I see Costco has the Interstate AGM's now. I wonder which Interstate model matches the Costco version? Such as this: https://www.interstatebatterie...m/products/mtx-47/h5. All the specs seem to match.


--------------------
I like Sigs and HK's, and maybe Glocks
 
Posts: 1959 | Location: SC | Registered: March 16, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Page late and a dollar short
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I like Wal-Mart Max batteries. The one in my 67 Pontiac gave up the ghost with use of a Battery Tender at just under nine years. 2010 I replaced the battery in my Sierra, when my daughter got rid of the truck in early 2017 it was still good to go.

Just put one in my Wrangler.


-------------------------------------——————
————————--Ignorance is a powerful tool if applied at the right time, even, usually, surpassing knowledge(E.J.Potter, A.K.A. The Michigan Madman)
 
Posts: 6072 | Location: Livingston County Michigan USA | Registered: August 11, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
member
Picture of henryaz
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quote:
Originally posted by jigray3:
There is a significant body of evidence from reputable sources that contradicts your position. Here is one example::.

"As with all gelled and sealed units, AGM batteries are sensitive to overcharging. A charge to 2.40V/cell (and higher) is fine; however, the float charge should be reduced to between 2.25 and 2.30V/cell (summer temperatures may require lower voltages). Automotive charging systems for flooded lead acid often have a fixed float voltage setting of 14.40V (2.40V/cell); a direct replacement with a sealed unit could overcharge the battery on a long drive. (See BU-403: Charging Lead Acid.)

I have four different types/brands of chargers (Samlex 15amp 3 stage, Associated 20amp 3 stage, BatteryTender+ 3 stage, and BatteryMinder 3 stage), and all of them float at 13.5v for both AGM and flooded batteries.
 
Regarding alternator voltage, I installed a digital voltmeter in my dashboard (nice OLED display, in hundredths of a volt, hooked up directly to the battery so it reads alternator output at all times). I have noticed a variation in alternator output, based on the condition of the battery. I believe this is the alternator's voltage regulator at work. If I haven't driven for a few days, the alternator output starts out around 14.4 volts, and gradually drops as the battery is charged. Driving for an hour at highway speeds, I see the alternator output drop to a float voltage of 13.5. This is in a 2010 Toyota Tacoma. So, no, I do not believe a modern alternator will harm an AGM battery. I use an Odyssey AGM in my Tacoma.



all your sig are belong to us
 
Posts: 9103 | Location: South Congress AZ | Registered: May 27, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Just installed Walmart Max platinum in my Jeep Wrangler (5yr warranty) We’ll see how it does.
 
Posts: 505 | Registered: April 29, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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