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BASTIDS OUT!
Picture of yanici
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quote:
Originally posted by Excam_Man:
First, does the heater even have a delay off blower?
(As I stated previously, most utility electric heaters do not)

What do you think happens to regular furnaces when the power happens to go off?
(Blower stops running)


I haven't wired one in many years but with all the hot air furnaces I did wire the blower continued to run after the combustion was off and until the chamber cooled down.


John

"Building a wall will violate the rights of millions of illegals." [Nancy Pelosi]
 
Posts: 2151 | Location: N.E. Massachusetts | Registered: June 05, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Thank you
Very little
Picture of HRK
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Excam_Man:
First, does the heater even have a delay off blower?
(As I stated previously, most utility electric heaters do not)

What do you think happens to regular furnaces when the power happens to go off?
(Blower stops running)


Interesting enough we have two space heaters, one small tower in the garage for cool winter nights. It has a 15 second count down delay when you power it off, turns off the heat cycle and blows the fan to cool the unit down before shutting off.

The other small unit in the house does not use that feature, however I'm in the habit of turning it from heat to fan only before turning off...

Can't really say if the furnace cycles the fan on after the furnace runs, since we don't run it except for testing....



 
Posts: 16440 | Location: FL | Registered: November 07, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Most garage (what I term unit heaters) do not have the cool down cycle. There are some newer styles that claim energy efficiency, that do. You need one of the ones that does not have this feature to work best with the power co shut off. Pick a model that has a remote thermostat option and see what voltage thermostat you need for the heater, if lower voltage then you are ok for door switch. If line(240v) volt then you will need a transformer and low voltage relay in the circuit to the thermostat.

Contact me if you need more help.
regards
 
Posts: 1043 | Location: Moved to N.W. MT. | Registered: April 26, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by yanici:
quote:
Originally posted by Excam_Man:
First, does the heater even have a delay off blower?
(As I stated previously, most utility electric heaters do not)

What do you think happens to regular furnaces when the power happens to go off?
(Blower stops running)


I haven't wired one in many years but with all the hot air furnaces I did wire the blower continued to run after the combustion was off and until the chamber cooled down.


Combustion/chamber, on an electric heater... Eek

Electric furnaces and electric utility heaters are two different animals.




 
Posts: 8776 | Registered: October 15, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Don't Panic
Picture of joel9507
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Maybe another approach might be to try to change the thermostat setting based on the garage door being open?

Rather than turning off the power which as noted earlier would stop the cool-down the heating elements need for durability, maybe sense the position of the door and then if it's open, set it to whatever the minimum setting is on the control.

If that's feasible, then the heater should turn itself off via the process built in by the manufacturer, with whatever cool-down period it needs.
 
Posts: 13520 | Location: North Carolina | Registered: October 15, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of bob ramberg
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quote:
Originally posted by Bulldog7972:
quote:
Originally posted by bob ramberg:
Be sure to check you local codes for what you can and cannot do regarding a heater in a garage. There may be some restrictions. But electric sounds like a good start.


You say electric is a good start. Why? Wouldn’t gas be better ?


I'm thinking that it may not be a good idea to have open flames in a room where you could have gasoline vapors or other flammable vapors accumulate. I believe Electric heaters are available where the heating elements don't get too hot, unlike a flame. I do some "hot work", from time to time, in my garage, but I'm there and I have the doors open.,


Bob
Carpe Scrotum
 
Posts: 1172 | Location: Democratic Peoples Republic of Madaganistan | Registered: February 20, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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