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Originally posted by tanner:


---------------------------------------
It's like my brain's a tree and you're those little cookie elves.
 
Posts: 1872 | Location: Spring, TX | Registered: February 26, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Little ray
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We used to get Charles Chips. They were good.




The fish is mute, expressionless. The fish doesn't think because the fish knows everything.
 
Posts: 46495 | Location: Texas | Registered: February 10, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Dating myself:
Charles Chips.
Home delivered fresh eggs and milk by a Dunkard (not drunkard) dude.
Molers dairy.
Shoemake dairy.


End of Earth: 2 Miles
Upper Peninsula: 4 Miles
 
Posts: 7250 | Location: Marquette MI | Registered: July 08, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by YooperSigs:
Dating myself:


That wasn't acceptable in the 50's. Eek



Hannibal ad portas. Carthago delenda est.
 
Posts: 5682 | Location: Utah | Registered: December 18, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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We hated peas, but our Mother loved them and insisted on including them with many meals. We could usually out-wait her by moving them around the plate, but my younger brother would always throw up when he did eat them. The solution we found was our table. It had tubular steel legs, with plastic caps on the ends. When she left the room, we shoved peas down those tubes like crazy. There were probably a few pounds of peas in the legs by the time we moved and had a different table.
 
 
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^^^^ Thanks for tickling my funny bone this morning Henry. That's hilarious! Big Grin

We'd try putting stuff in our pockets, but never thought of using the table legs.


________________________________________________________

"How dreadful are the curses which Mohammedanism lays on its votaries! Besides the fanatical frenzy, which is as dangerous in a man as hydrophobia in a dog, there is this fearful fatalistic apathy." Winston Churchill
 
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california
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Originally posted by cas:
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>
The worst thing about copy and past email forwards....
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>
looks like an old usenet to me.
 
Posts: 9106 | Location: NV | Registered: July 04, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
On the DL
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Originally posted by YooperSigs:

Dating myself
Is that what they're calling it now?



A mind is a terrible thing.
 
Posts: 18995 | Location: Central Florida (near Orlando) | Registered: January 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Legalize the Constitution
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Originally posted by Anush:
Crisco was for baking pies.

As far as I knew, there was no such thing as cooking oil, my mother used Crisco for frying as well as baking...except for one thing, she called it “lard.” I don’t believe she ever used real lard, but she always called shortening “lard.” Unfortunately, she also never used real butter, but called margarine “butter.” That was one of the first things I remedied after leaving home.


__________________________________________________________
Carpe mañana
 
Posts: 7905 | Location: Wyoming | Registered: January 10, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Little ray
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quote:
Originally posted by TMats:
quote:
Originally posted by Anush:
Crisco was for baking pies.

As far as I knew, there was no such thing as cooking oil, my mother used Crisco for frying as well as baking...except for one thing, she called it “lard.” I don’t believe she ever used real lard, but she always called shortening “lard.” Unfortunately, she also never used real butter, but called margarine “butter.” That was one of the first things I remedied after leaving home.


That was one unfortunate trend of the '50s - margarine and other prepared foods, and mixes. My mother-in-law was generally a good cook, but she came to the U.S. in the late '50s and learned to use margarine, jello, Kool-Whip and lots of other "fake" ingredients.




The fish is mute, expressionless. The fish doesn't think because the fish knows everything.
 
Posts: 46495 | Location: Texas | Registered: February 10, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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My mother made 3-4 quarts of Carnation instant non-fat milk in re-purposed mayo jars every Sunday night for the upcoming week. I hated the stuff. Once I left for college I switched to whole or 2% and never looked back.


_________________________________________________________________________
You MATTER. Unless you multiply yourself by the speed of light squared. Then you ENERGY.

The afternoon knows what the morning never suspected.
-- Robert Frost
 
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Stale white bread was crumbled and thrown to the birds in the back yard.

You rich folk.... at our house it became bread pudding. Or French Toast if we were being good. the birds got to eat worms.




I have my own style of humor. I call it Snarkasm.
 
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Originally posted by 229DAK:
My mother made 3-4 quarts of Carnation instant non-fat milk in re-purposed mayo jars every Sunday night for the upcoming week. I hated the stuff. Once I left for college I switched to whole or 2% and never looked back.


Thanks very little for reminding me of that gag-fest. Worked okay right up until Mom set a glass of it in front of Dad. Came to a screeching halt right then and there.

It's odd, when I was a kid a tall glass or two of REAL milk was part of every meal.

Now I don't think I could gag down a glass of milk if I was dying of thirst. Okay on cereal and for cooking but to just pour and drink a glass of milk...bleah.




Be careful when following the masses. Sometimes the M is silent.
 
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Originally posted by 229DAK:
My mother made 3-4 quarts of Carnation instant non-fat milk ....


My mother tried convincing us kids to drink that stuff to save a little money, and I wonder how many families are reduced to that sort of thing today.
She finally relented on that point when all of us objected strenuously because it didn’t taste like other milk, not even skim milk in the carton (that I still drink in large quantities).




“Most men … can seldom accept the simplest and most obvious truth if it … would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions … which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabrics of their lives.”
— Leo Tolstoy
 
Posts: 38666 | Location: 10,150 Feet Above Sea Level in Colorado | Registered: April 04, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by PHPaul:
quote:
Originally posted by 229DAK:
My mother made 3-4 quarts of Carnation instant non-fat milk in re-purposed mayo jars every Sunday night for the upcoming week. I hated the stuff. Once I left for college I switched to whole or 2% and never looked back.


Thanks very little for reminding me of that gag-fest. Worked okay right up until Mom set a glass of it in front of Dad. Came to a screeching halt right then and there.

It's odd, when I was a kid a tall glass or two of REAL milk was part of every meal.

Now I don't think I could gag down a glass of milk if I was dying of thirst. Okay on cereal and for cooking but to just pour and drink a glass of milk...bleah.


My mom used it sometimes, too. She was being frugal, but that stuff is nasty.

Like you, I couldn't drink a glass of milk now if I had too. Nasty cow squeezings.




The fish is mute, expressionless. The fish doesn't think because the fish knows everything.
 
Posts: 46495 | Location: Texas | Registered: February 10, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by henryaz:
 
We hated peas, but our Mother loved them and insisted on including them with many meals. We could usually out-wait her by moving them around the plate, but my younger brother would always throw up when he did eat them. The solution we found was our table. It had tubular steel legs, with plastic caps on the ends. When she left the room, we shoved peas down those tubes like crazy. There were probably a few pounds of peas in the legs by the time we moved and had a different table.
 


Prince, my Labrador Retriever, saved me a number of times. He and I formed a symbiosis. Smile




This space intentionally left blank.
 
Posts: 4533 | Location: Florida | Registered: August 16, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Swanson’s TV dinners on a TV tray in front of the tv - now THAT was special.

Let’s see, channel selection was 2,4,5,7 and maybe 13 in the NJ/NY metropolitan area. “Rabbit ears” were moved around to get a clearer picture. Sometimes an aluminum foil “flag” was attached for further improvement. Of course the TV was black and white. It was “portable” which meant it had a suitcase handle on top. I was the “remote control”.

Fish sticks were a favorite of mine too.

Howard Johnson’s and 28 flavors of ice cream...

Telephone color selection? Black and.... black.

If the family got a long distance phone call it was either good news (wedding,engagement, birth) or a death in the family.

No answering machines.

Huntley and Brinkley reported the news. Probably the last news I ever trusted. “Good night Chet...”
 
Posts: 1308 | Location: south central Pennsylvania | Registered: November 05, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Muzzle flash
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quote:
Originally posted by PHPaul:
quote:
Originally posted by 229DAK:
My mother made 3-4 quarts of Carnation instant non-fat milk in re-purposed mayo jars every Sunday night for the upcoming week. I hated the stuff. Once I left for college I switched to whole or 2% and never looked back.


Thanks very little for reminding me of that gag-fest. Worked okay right up until Mom set a glass of it in front of Dad. Came to a screeching halt right then and there.

It's odd, when I was a kid a tall glass or two of REAL milk was part of every meal.

Now I don't think I could gag down a glass of milk if I was dying of thirst. Okay on cereal and for cooking but to just pour and drink a glass of milk...bleah.
I like milk, but drink 2% to keep from getting fat(ter). Several times a month I go to a local Waffle House for a waffle supper (with scrambled eggs and bacon or sausage)--I have a large glass of milk with that meal.

flashguy




Texan by choice, not accident of birth

When they ask me, "Paper or plastic?" I just say, "Doesn't matter to me. I am bi-sacksual."
 
Posts: 20756 | Location: Dallas, TX | Registered: May 08, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by henryaz:
 
We hated peas, but our Mother loved them and insisted on including them with many meals. We could usually out-wait her by moving them around the plate, but my younger brother would always throw up when he did eat them. The solution we found was our table. It had tubular steel legs, with plastic caps on the ends. When she left the room, we shoved peas down those tubes like crazy. There were probably a few pounds of peas in the legs by the time we moved and had a different table.
 


Danged peas were a vegetable, or fruit, or GKW plant, of dinner contention into the 1970s. My sister would gag on green peas and spit the peas out as a reflex action. For some reason this green pea repulsion was regarded by my father as something akin to a personal insult. My sister would be forced to sit at the dinner table for an hour after we finished to eat something like 10 green peas. No shit, we would be watching Wild Kingdom with a lion chewing the guts out of a gazelle but my sister was treated like an unlearned outlander for green pea aversion. Strangely, she now readily eats peas and the once hated brocolli.

She now refuses to force unliked food on her children and lives app 1,500 miles distance from our parents.


"It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye". The Little Prince, Antoine de Saint-Exupery, pilot and author, lost on mission, July 1944, Med Theatre.
 
Posts: 4647 | Location: Central Texas | Registered: September 14, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Staring back
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I love fresh peas, even as a child. I'd eat more of them right out of the pod than I put in the bucket.

But...mom canned them and we had to eat them canned all winter long.

Ever eaten canned peas? Awful! Bitter and mushy. Nasty.


________________________________________________________

"How dreadful are the curses which Mohammedanism lays on its votaries! Besides the fanatical frenzy, which is as dangerous in a man as hydrophobia in a dog, there is this fearful fatalistic apathy." Winston Churchill
 
Posts: 15259 | Location: Montana | Registered: November 01, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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