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I am quite hillbilly. All my roots are in KY. I recall my Grandmother going out the back door, armed with a cleaver. We would then have either have fried chicken, chicken and noodles or chicken noodle soup. I dont recall the recipe except to know that anything from a can is a poor substitute. As for curing me of anything, my Grandmother or Mother would tell me "you are not really sick, so stop whining"! Most injuries just got me a heavy coating of Iodine. My skin was a lovely shade of orange most of my childhood.


End of Earth: 2 Miles
Upper Peninsula: 4 Miles
 
Posts: 11333 | Location: Marquette MI | Registered: July 08, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Here is my 100 year old recipe, passed down through the generations. It’s not exact but it doesn’t have to be. This was a family recipe that started in a Jewish Deli in NYC. The deli is gone but the recipe lives on.

Throw a large roaster, into a large pot of water.

Add:

A bunch of celery, sliced
A bunch of carrots, sliced
2 large turnips, chopped
2 large parsnips, sliced
1 bunch of fresh dill, chopped fine
2 tablespoons of paprika
Salt and pepper to taste

* peel carrots, turnips and parsnips first.

Add water so it’s a couple or 3 inches from the rim.

Bring to a boil, stirring so the chicken doesn’t stick to the bottom of the pot.

Simmer for 3-4 hours and cool enough to handle.
Using a colander or large slotted spoon remove bone and skin, discard.

Remove meat, chop it and return to the pot.

Enjoy.


If I’m going to go through making it I’ll make a lot. Can or freeze the rest.

Edited to add, I use a huge stock pot and this makes 12-15 quarts. If this is too much just use a smaller chicken and cut the ingredients in half.
 
Posts: 12505 | Registered: June 20, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks for the recipe, Jeff Yarchin. I will make it today and take some to a friend who is undergoing chemo.
 
Posts: 2297 | Location: Hurricane Central | Registered: February 03, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Thank you
Very little
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quote:
Originally posted by Rev. A. J. Forsyth:
quote:
I would gladly trade a jar of garlic Claussen whole pickles for the recipe LOL even toss in a order of hot bialys


For fart soup or the above-mentioned gumbo?


V-tails famous Kosher Chicken soup!

quote:
Originally posted by Jeff Yarchin:
Here is my 100 year old recipe, passed down through the generations. It’s not exact but it doesn’t have to be. This was a family recipe that started in a Jewish Deli in NYC. The deli is gone but the recipe lives on.

Throw a large roaster, into a large pot of water.

Add:

A bunch of celery, sliced
A bunch of carrots, sliced
2 large turnips, chopped
2 large parsnips, sliced
1 bunch of fresh dill, chopped fine
2 tablespoons of paprika
Salt and pepper to taste

* peel carrots, turnips and parsnips first.

Add water so it’s a couple or 3 inches from the rim.

Bring to a boil, stirring so the chicken doesn’t stick to the bottom of the pot.

Simmer for 3-4 hours and cool enough to handle.
Using a colander or large slotted spoon remove bone and skin, discard.

Remove meat, chop it and return to the pot.

Enjoy.


Jeff outside of the turnips and parsnip that's my mothers chicken soup recipe, she cooked it in a crockpot all day, and used a cut up whole fryer, breasts, drums, etc. with the skin on.

Nothing better on a cold KY winter day...



 
Posts: 16440 | Location: FL | Registered: November 07, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have a pot boiling now. I notice that this recipe does NOT have onion. Aren't onions traditional in this soup?
 
Posts: 2297 | Location: Hurricane Central | Registered: February 03, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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No onion.
 
Posts: 12505 | Registered: June 20, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Unfortunately, my great-grandmother's recipe was discarded after her passing. I do recall from middle school years helping her make it. That memory inspired me to seek out something similar. Below is a link that I started with, altering it to my preferences, making my own version.

Made so much that I shared with neighbors. They claimed it to be the best they ever tasted. If your used to canned soup, that would make sense.

The Ultimate Chicken Noodle Soup Recipe: How to Make It | Taste of Home
https://www.tasteofhome.com/re...chicken-noodle-soup/


--Tom
The right of self preservation, in turn, was understood as the right to defend oneself against attacks by lawless individuals, or, if absolutely necessary, to resist and throw off a tyrannical government.
 
Posts: 1136 | Location: Lehigh County,PA-USA | Registered: February 20, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Jeff Yarchin:
Here is my 100 year old recipe, passed down through the generations. It’s not exact but it doesn’t have to be. This was a family recipe that started in a Jewish Deli in NYC. The deli is gone but the recipe lives on.

Throw a large roaster, into a large pot of water.

Add:

A bunch of celery, sliced
A bunch of carrots, sliced
2 large turnips, chopped
2 large parsnips, sliced
1 bunch of fresh dill, chopped fine
2 tablespoons of paprika
Salt and pepper to taste

* peel carrots, turnips and parsnips first.

Add water so it’s a couple or 3 inches from the rim.

Bring to a boil, stirring so the chicken doesn’t stick to the bottom of the pot.

Simmer for 3-4 hours and cool enough to handle.
Using a colander or large slotted spoon remove bone and skin, discard.

Remove meat, chop it and return to the pot.

Enjoy.


If I’m going to go through making it I’ll make a lot. Can or freeze the rest.

Edited to add, I use a huge stock pot and this makes 12-15 quarts. If this is too much just use a smaller chicken and cut the ingredients in half.


I like the looks of that recipe. Question: do you discard the vegetables. I'd think they would be very soft, and falling apart. Most recipes call for straining the broth before adding the chicken pieces back in and adding fresh vegetables that will cook until done. Also, if I were to add onion, it would be a hole onion which for sure would be jettisoned after the initial cook.



Men fight for liberty and win it with hard knocks. Their children, brought up easy, let it slip away again, poor fools. And their grandchildren are once more slaves.

-D.H. Lawrence
 
Posts: 10084 | Location: Fort Worth, Texas | Registered: February 07, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by NavyGuy:
snip

I like the looks of that recipe. Question: do you discard the vegetables. I'd think they would be very soft, and falling apart. Most recipes call for straining the broth before adding the chicken pieces back in and adding fresh vegetables that will cook until done. Also, if I were to add onion, it would be a hole onion which for sure would be jettisoned after the initial cook.


If you cut them thick they will hold up pretty well. I definitely leave them in.
 
Posts: 12505 | Registered: June 20, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Posts: 12505 | Registered: June 20, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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OK...It is officially Mardi Gras season and I remembered that I had a Mardi Gras Gumbo recipe from Chef John Folse. As a rule, I think that most folks foul up a gumbo when they use a recipe but for those who like to use one here it is untouched exactly like I found it in a recipe book:

MARDI GRAS GUMBO
Chef John Folse

PREP TIME: 2 Hours SERVES: 8-10

COMMENT:

Almost every species of wild game in Louisiana has been used in the creation of gumbo. Since most Cajun men were hunters & trappers, it is not surprising that they preferred Mallard duck & smoked andouille gumbo. However, chicken & sausage is still the most popular gumbo choice in Louisiana.

INGREDIENTS


• 1-5 pound stewing hen
• 1 pound smoked sausage or andouille
• 1 cup oil
• 1 1/2 cups flour
• 2 cups chopped onions
• 2 cups chopped celery
• 1 cup chopped bell pepper
• 1/4 cup diced garlic
• 3 quarts chicken stock (see recipe)
• 24 button mushrooms
• 2 cups sliced green onions
• 1 bay leaf
• sprig of thyme
• 1 tbsp chopped basil
• salt & cracked pepper to taste
• Louisiana Gold Pepper Sauce to taste
• 1/2 cup chopped parsley
• 4 cups cooked white rice


METHOD:

Using a sharp boning knife, cut the stewing hen into eight to ten serving pieces. Remove as much of the fat from the chicken as possible. Cut smoked sausage or andouille into half inch slices & set aside. In a two gallon stock pot, heat oil over medium high heat. Sprinkle in flour & using a wire whisk, whip constantly until golden brown roux is achieved (see roux technique). Do not scorch. Should black specks appear, discard & begin again. Add onions, celery, bell pepper & garlic. Saute three to five minutes or until vegetables are wilted. Add chicken & sausage, blending well into vegetable mixture. Saute approximately fifteen minutes. Add chicken stock, one ladle at a time, stirring constantly until all is incorporated. Bring to a rolling boil, reduce to simmer & cook approximately one hour. Skim any fat or oil that rises to the top of the pot. Add mushrooms, green onions, bay leaf, thyme & basil. Season to taste using salt, pepper & Louisiana Gold. Cook an additional one to two hours if necessary, until chicken is tender & falling apart. Add parsley, adjust seasonings & serve over hot, steamed white rice. You may wish to boil the chicken one to two hours prior to beginning the gumbo. This will tenderize the meat & you may reserve the stock, debone the chicken & use the meat & stock in the gumbo.


T-Boy
 
Posts: 497 | Location: Texas Hill Country | Registered: September 19, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Jeff Yarchin:
Here is my 100 year old recipe, passed down through the generations. It’s not exact but it doesn’t have to be. This was a family recipe that started in a Jewish Deli in NYC. The deli is gone but the recipe lives on.

Throw a large roaster, into a large pot of water.

Add:

A bunch of celery, sliced
A bunch of carrots, sliced
2 large turnips, chopped
2 large parsnips, sliced
1 bunch of fresh dill, chopped fine
2 tablespoons of paprika
Salt and pepper to taste

* peel carrots, turnips and parsnips first.

Add water so it’s a couple or 3 inches from the rim.

Bring to a boil, stirring so the chicken doesn’t stick to the bottom of the pot.

Simmer for 3-4 hours and cool enough to handle.
Using a colander or large slotted spoon remove bone and skin, discard.

Remove meat, chop it and return to the pot.

Enjoy.


If I’m going to go through making it I’ll make a lot. Can or freeze the rest.

Edited to add, I use a huge stock pot and this makes 12-15 quarts. If this is too much just use a smaller chicken and cut the ingredients in half.


Jeff; Gotta try my hand at this next time a cold front rolls in. Thanks!!!


T-Boy
 
Posts: 497 | Location: Texas Hill Country | Registered: September 19, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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TBoy
We’ll all need this when the Polar Vortex comes our way.
 
Posts: 10583 | Location: NE OHIO | Registered: October 22, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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