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Is it worth it fixing an "inexpensive" watch? Login/Join 
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posted
Inexpensive, relative to what watches can cost.


I have a Seiko Orange Monster that I bought in 2012. It was always a tad slow, losing 4-5 minutes a month. Not enough to fret over. A few years ago it got worse and worse, losing that or more a day. I researched how to adjust it and did, slowly over the course of two or more months. (you know, because they closer you get it, the longer it takes to show) I was happy. Smile

Eventually I took it off and didn't wear in for a month or two. When I did wear it, it was suddenly fast. Very fast, gaining five or ten minutes an hour. Roll Eyes Recent efforts haven't proved successful.

I could have it repaired, but I can't see spending $100-$175 or whatever to fix a $225 watch. I like it, but it has so sentimental value, so a brand new one (were I so inclined) would be just as good.

Is that the morm, spend 3/4 of the watches value every 5-7 years to get it serviced? Seems to me you quickly end up with the woodsman's axe.

Just wondering on the forums consensus, opinions, advice.



The old woodsman's axe; "I've owned that axe for 50 years. Sure it's had three new heads and twelve handles, but it's the best axe I've ever owned." Wink


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Posts: 16636 | Location: 18th & Fairfax  | Registered: May 17, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I would purchase something more reliable.

My rule of thumb for something like that is >50% of original cost, and there has been a significant change in technology or new gadget that I prefer then replace.

--K
 
Posts: 57 | Registered: January 27, 2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Savor the limelight
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I spent $140 to have my Seiko Orange Knight repaired and refurbished. It cost my $225 new. I like the watch and I don't see any other watches for less than $1,000 I like better, so it was worth it to me.
 
Posts: 4627 | Location: SWFL | Registered: October 10, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Little ray
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Could it have been magnetized? Try degaussing it first. That should be very inexpensive.

A simple regulation of the movement shouldn't be expensive, but the fact that the error is now different that it was before indicates something is broken.

The long and short of it is that it is hard to economically repair a watch in that price range. You can get a new one for $400, maybe less.




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Posts: 47551 | Location: Texas | Registered: February 10, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Ammoholic
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I recently went through this with a $500, 20 year old Movado. Hit $400 on repairs - polish watch and band, replace out of production gold dot in band, disassemble, clean, reassemble, front/back seals, and new sapphire. Even though it has sentimental value I decided against the woodsman's watch. I can replace it with new for $700 or repair/restore for $400. Got the battery replaced and left the rest, they said don't wear it in the rain and it should work. Hasn't lost any time yet.

He also cautioned me that the newer Movado watches use cheaper movements than the old ones which means I can't get as thin of one anymore. I hate it when something gets popular and they change it to make it cheaper and easier to produce then flood the market with crap.



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Posts: 13527 | Location: Loudoun County, Virginia | Registered: December 27, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
I could have it repaired, but I can't see spending $100-$175 or whatever to fix a $225 watch.


 
Posts: 21878 | Location: Johnson City/Elizabethton, TN | Registered: April 28, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Funny Man
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What it cost originally really shouldn't be a factor. The issue is the cost to repair/clean etc... I have a Seiko diver that I bought a decade ago. When it stopped running I just stuck it in a box and forgot about it. I recently found it, dropped it at the local watch shop for a good cleaning and tune up for a cost of $125.00. Was it worth $125....yes, it was to me. I couldn't buy a watch for $125 that I like nearly as much. I have been wearing it quite a bit since and am glad I got her running again.

I feel better about that $125 spent on a relatively cheap watch than I do about the $500 it cost to have my Hublot serviced.


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Posts: 6156 | Location: Austin, TX | Registered: June 29, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Sell it to stickman. He'll have it repaired and then show it off, making all us Seiko-junkies just a little bit envious. Cool



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Posts: 8977 | Location: Hokie Nation! | Registered: July 15, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The Orange Monster is assume and I would say it's worth a little trouble if it's otherwise in good shape. Put your watch next to a compass and see if it changes the direction the compass is pointing. That will show you if it has been magnetized. If not consider purchasing a new movement for about $50 and have a watchmaker replace it for about the same.
 
Posts: 757 | Location: New Mexico | Registered: November 04, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have and wear daily, a watch that was made in the early 90’s for Pussers (a rum company). It has nautical flags on the dial for numbers (Spelling BN PUSSERS RUM) and is sentimental to me. My father and sister each got one on a trip to the Caribbean (St. John), and I was given mine a couple years later. Turns out, they stopped making/selling them - mine was one of three left in stock. I’ve had it for 25 years now, and will keep it going as long as possible.

Over the years, as with any daily worn watch, it has take a beating. I’ve replaced the crystal twice, and put a new movement in it about a year ago (water apparently got in when the first crystal replacement was done causing some rust in the movement).

I’ve certainly put more money into it over the years than it cost, and more than its worth according to the few I’ve seen come up on EBay. But I can’t get a new one, I love it, and frequently get nice comments on it as it is an unusual design. I’ll continue to maintain it as one as possible. If your watch has that kind of sentimental value to you, then the price of a repair really doesn’t matter.
 
Posts: 1887 | Location: NC | Registered: January 01, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Mechanical watches need periodic servicing every7-10yrs or so. Just part of the deal. You can buy another watch but you're still going to have to service it one day.
 
Posts: 2899 | Registered: January 27, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Here’s my opinion, because you asked!

Do you like the watch? Would you wear it a lot if its movement were running right?

Then sure, get it fixed. Losing five minutes a month wasn’t great but within range for that movement. Servicing should be factored into the lifetime cost of a watch. A Rolex OP might be $7000 out the door, but expect a grand or so every five to seven years.

With a Seiko, a service likely means a whole replacement movement. So you’ll get one whose positional variance could be drastically different than the one in there right now (the recent downturn notwithstanding).

In short, if you like it, you can get it running again for less than the cost of a whole new watch. If the case and other parts are worn down, I’d let it die a natural death.
 
Posts: 346 | Registered: November 22, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Great karma, add me!

Wink




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Posts: 10360 | Location: NC | Registered: August 16, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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If you wear a watch that's running fast you'll live longer



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Posts: 24821 | Location: Highland, Ut. | Registered: May 07, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I own two Seiko monsters I bought many years ago. One is in mint condition and one is in need of repair.
Depending on what model you have it might be worth repairing/servicing.
If you look them up on Chrono 24 and ebay the price has gone up quite a bit in the last few years.




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Posts: 1379 | Location: Central Florida, south of the mouse | Registered: March 08, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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While I’m not a big fan of Seiko I get what your asking. To jhe888 point about magnetization maybe spot on. Others here have fixed them economically. I have an inexpensive Hamilton I wear a lot. It is sub $500 I would probably replace it. I have other expensive watches that I service. Watches require service over time.
There are others here that know watches and movements.
https://www.60clicks.com/ultim...er-collectors-guide/
If you like the watch see how cheaply you can fix it. If not, if not it owes you nothing.





 
Posts: 1305 | Location: Boardwalk, Va Beach | Registered: March 10, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
His Royal Hiney
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You might want to send it to a Seiko Repair center for evaluation and estimate.

I thought my citizen was kaput. I sent it in to a citizen watch repair center. I wanted an estimate. I bought it maybe in 2010. Turns out they fixed it for free and it only cost me the postage to send it in.



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Posts: 15452 | Location: Bay Area, CA | Registered: March 24, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have a watch collection. One of my favourites is an Ebel Sports Wave 22 automatic. After just six years the stem winder thread gave up the ghost, and refused to engage. I sent it off to the main Ebel and everything fixer in nearby Norfolk for a quote to repair.

Back came the quote - $885.38 + 20% VAT.

Nowadays I don't bother trying to screw the winder in - nobody notices anyhow.
 
Posts: 9378 | Location: UK, OR, ONT | Registered: July 10, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Seeker of Clarity
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quote:
Originally posted by Kranky:
I would purchase something more reliable.

My rule of thumb for something like that is >50% of original cost, and there has been a significant change in technology or new gadget that I prefer then replace.

--K



7 years with a machine beating 28,000 times per hour in a waterproof case on your wrist telling the time, day and date. All for $200.

$2 a month. And that's using todays prices. He bought it for under $200 back then. Reliable enough in my book.

I'd judge by the case condition, but honestly, why not try a new color or look at this point?



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Posts: 8873 | Registered: August 02, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Seeker of Clarity
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quote:
Originally posted by darthfuster:
If you wear a watch that's running fast you'll live longer


lol



"Whatever you spend your time on, it's all you have". -- Faramarz
 
Posts: 8873 | Registered: August 02, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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