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Educate me on putting a flatbed on a pickup. Login/Join 
Green grass and
high tides
Picture of old rugged cross
posted
This is something I have been thinking about for some time.

Today I test drove about a 10 year old F350 4wd with one. It was an extra cab. Obviously a work truck. Had the 6.2 gas engine with 150k on the clock.

Ran fan and was priced decently.

A few more miles than I am comfortable with.

Could buy a similar F350 pickup in better condition and less miles for less. Buy a flat bed and install and save $3-5k.

So any issues with removing a pick up box and installing a flatbed?

Thanks guys.



"Practice like you want to play in the game"
 
Posts: 15485 | Registered: September 21, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
probably a good thing
I don't have a cut
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Where would you buy the flat bed? If you buy the flat bed new, wouldn't they install it for you?
 
Posts: 2629 | Location: Tampa, FL | Registered: February 09, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
safe & sound
Picture of a1abdj
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I haven't purchased a new truck in a few years, but sometimes a one ton chassis will have a different set of frame rails than a one ton pick up. Just make sure whichever flat bed you purchase is set up for whichever version you have.


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Posts: 14539 | Location: St. Charles, MO, USA | Registered: September 22, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
No, not like
Bill Clinton
Picture of BigSwede
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Cheapest I can get a steel flat bed built and installed is about $3500. If it's a pickup it should be a 56" CA (cab to axle) Ford might be a 58", you would max out at a 9' bed


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“I owe my success to having listened respectfully to the very best advice, and then going away and doing the exact opposite.”
 
Posts: 3171 | Location: GA | Registered: September 23, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of henryaz
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There are plenty around here, almost all are Bradford Built. Horse owners seem to be the primary users of flat beds, towing their gooseneck horse trailer and hauling hay. There are even more than a few Freightliners with flat beds, for the wealthier horse owners.
 
In the winter, we see even more, many more, as the team ropers congregate here. There are daily competitions at 5 venues, and the Nationals are held here as well.



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Posts: 9817 | Location: South Congress AZ | Registered: May 27, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of Krazeehorse
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Having done this a couple times because the OE bed rotted out I can say I was never really happy with the flatbed. I didn't haul anything that made it better, for instance nothing loaded on pallets. 20 bags of softener salt was more secure in the original bed.


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Posts: 4653 | Location: Ohio | Registered: December 27, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Taking the bed off is a quick and easy job if you have the tools and a way to lift the bed off the truck. The question is will a flat bed, rather than a standard pickup bed, suit your needs?
 
Posts: 82 | Location: KDTO...NTX | Registered: October 03, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Green grass and
high tides
Picture of old rugged cross
posted Hide Post
Thanks guys. Paten, good point. But will look first for a good used one. Krazeehorse. I know one will suit my needs just fine.

Big Swede, are you talking about having a custom one built. I was thinking a bradford, CM, hillsboro, etc



"Practice like you want to play in the game"
 
Posts: 15485 | Registered: September 21, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of mcrimm
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These are a very available commodity in Montana. Most ranchers/farmers/horse people have a flatbed. Stock units are stacked up at sales locations and welding shops custom make them with all sorts of goodies welded on. PJ makes quality trailers and truck boxes/flatbeds.

https://pjtrailers.com/truck-beds



I'm sorry if I hurt you feelings when I called you stupid - I thought you already knew - Unknown
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When you have no future, you live in the past. " Sycamore Row" by John Grisham
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Posts: 3069 | Location: Kalispell Montana & Florida’s Emerald Coast for the Winter | Registered: December 24, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
No, not like
Bill Clinton
Picture of BigSwede
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quote:
Big Swede, are you talking about having a custom one built. I was thinking a bradford, CM, hillsboro, etc


Yes, plain flatbed with a bulkhead and receiver hitch like this

http://www.comtruckequip.com/c...ry/flatbeds-31?api=0

Or a skirted gooseneck like this

http://www.comtruckequip.com/c...osenecks%20-53?api=0

I have a few vendors that make their own, cheapest way to go unless you want one of those fancy hauler beds like CM. I try to keep the fancier CM's in stock for the rich folk with horses, some of them can get up to $11-12K. CM TM Deluxe for example


*********************
“I owe my success to having listened respectfully to the very best advice, and then going away and doing the exact opposite.”
 
Posts: 3171 | Location: GA | Registered: September 23, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The people in my area who plow snow do it all the time because mounting a sander on the flatbed is way easier on/off. Its easy to do provided you have a way to move the bed and the flatbed on/off(bed light enough to do with a couple of your friends the new flatbed will take mechanical help).


“So in war, the way is to avoid what is strong, and strike at what is weak.”
 
Posts: 9386 | Registered: October 14, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Another idea might be to find an older F350 with a lift gate. I know my neighbor uses his all the time. He's always loading up things to take to his salvage yard and it seems to be a good combo for hauling heavy stuff.
 
Posts: 5640 | Location: CO | Registered: October 11, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Thank you
Very little
Picture of HRK
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Hear there is a flatbed shop that specializes in Fords near Winslow Arizona....



 
Posts: 16605 | Location: FL | Registered: November 07, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Must you stand on a corner?
 
Posts: 510 | Location: Wyoming | Registered: February 26, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of old dino
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quote:
Originally posted by Inusuit:
Must you stand on a corner?


"Take it easy" on him, a flatbed Ford is a "fine sight to see". Smile


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Posts: 1630 | Registered: November 16, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Green grass and
high tides
Picture of old rugged cross
posted Hide Post
Thanks for the feedback guys. I appreciate it.



"Practice like you want to play in the game"
 
Posts: 15485 | Registered: September 21, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I had an ‘89 F350 diesel flatbed for a number of years. Stake sides were removable. Bed had a hydraulic dump. It was a good truck and handy at times. The bed on it was 8’ wide by 12’ long. Dually and 4wd. Pretty good work truck.

I have taken standard beds off of trucks and that is pretty easy. Handy to have a backhoe as a crane to lift and swing the bed off. Putting a flat bed on is a little more complex. While the bed might be flat on the bottom, the truck chassis often is not. Some kind of metalwork is needed to attach the two. Typically bolted on from the metal brackets to the chassis. The brackets would be welded to the bed to fit the specific truck. Some people can do this at home, everyone else pays for the job.

Truck weighed some 8-9k lbs. GVW was 12,000 lbs. So total load was around 3,000 lbs. With the bed so big it was easy to overload.
 
Posts: 1875 | Location: south central Pennsylvania | Registered: November 05, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Just as a small counter to the above. The ones I have done were specifically designed and sold for the specific truck and model involved and include every bolt, bracket, hanger, whatever you needed to install. Nothing had to be fabricated.


“So in war, the way is to avoid what is strong, and strike at what is weak.”
 
Posts: 9386 | Registered: October 14, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Shit don't
mean shit
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I have a friend who's uncle owns a cattle ranch on the Colorado eastern plains. I've been there a few times antelope hunting. 80% of the ranchers remove the original bed for a flatbed. I am perplexed as to why, and I've never asked. The only thing I can think of is it's easier to load hay from the side.

Just about every rancher has their original bed sitting next to their barn. North side so it doesn't get as much sun.
 
Posts: 5158 | Location: 7400 feet in Conifer CO | Registered: November 14, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of mjlennon
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I bought a 2000 F550 and had a flatbed dump with stake sides installed. Cost around $7k for body and hoist installed. Truck already had the PTO option. If it didn't or if had A/T, I could have installed an electric hoist.

You gotta ask yourself if the dump is worth an extra couple grand. I don't use it often, but with my illing back, it sure makes it easier.
 
Posts: 1563 | Location: Georgia | Registered: December 08, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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