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Picture of bigdeal
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quote:
Originally posted by Black92LX:
Work smarter not harder.
Shark bites just flat work and generally take less time then soldering.
Yep, and they make really crappy plumbers like me into pretty decent plumbers. Smile


-----------------------------
Guns are awesome because they shoot solid lead freedom. Every man should have several guns. And several dogs, because a man with a cat is a woman. Kurt Schlichter
 
Posts: 25984 | Location: Orlando, FL | Registered: April 30, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by SgtGold:

So is the space shuttle and we all know what happened with that.

My point is all of this non soldered stuff looks like it's a good time and money saver, but I am wondering if we're going to see a rash of plumbing failures as these instalations age. I know plenty of people with 50+ year old houses that were plumed with copper, are there any out there witb the plastic stuff?


And I've repaired several copper lines due to leaks. It's not the end all be all of plumbing.




 
Posts: 7419 | Registered: October 15, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
This Space for Rent
Picture of ugeesta
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quote:
Originally posted by MattW:
quote:
Originally posted by ugeesta:
Well, we recently developed a 270 unit, 16 story apartment building and the plumber used the ProPress compression system. Just after the building was completed and before we started moving in tenants 1” branch line separated from the 2” Main sometime over a weekend.

The end result was over 100 units flooded which equated to about $3.5 million in damaged and a million or so in lost rent while the repair work was completed.

Yeah, we are not real fans of the ProPress system. That being said, it’s more common than not and problems like what we experienced are rare.

It could have happened with a soldered joint as well. Its more the installer that the product.


Man, would have loved to be on that mitigation job. Who did the work?


I was not involved with the clean up but it was a Belfor or Servpro type company. It wasn’t cheap from what I was told.




We will never know world peace, until three people can simultaneously look each other straight in the eye

Liberals are like pussycats and Twitter is Trump's laser pointer to keep them busy while he takes care of business - Rey HRH.
 
Posts: 4732 | Location: N-E Ohio | Registered: April 20, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Unapologetic Old
School Curmudgeon
Picture of Lord Vaalic
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Pex, and sharkbites have been used in industrial pipefitting for a long time, They are becoming common in residential now but have a track record in industrial uses


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- "This town reminds me of something in the bible."
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- "The part right before god gets angry"
 
Posts: 7852 | Location: TN | Registered: December 18, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of cas
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So do lots of bad things. Big Grin


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Posts: 15537 | Location: 18th & Fairfax  | Registered: May 17, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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^^^ Dat True!




 
Posts: 7419 | Registered: October 15, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have dealt with PEX installed since the beginning and would never trust it in my own home and never behind walls. All of my professional licensed plumber friends feel the same way about it here in South Florida and will not use it. Chlorinated water does a real number on it.

Shark bites on copper pipe seem to do ok. But when they fail they tend to blow completely off, it is usually rare that they fail when installed on copper. My preference over shark bites would be compression fittings on/near a hot water heater if you're looking to get away from braising. I have had one old compression one almost fail on a hot water heater though. I went to install a new water heater and noticed the old compression fitting turned a little and I went to tighten it and it fell off in my hand, the compression ring was totally rotted out. I was very lucky to catch it.

Personally, I feel braised copper fittings are the way to go. It's rare that they fail. If they do fail usually it's a small stream that you catch in time. All of the 52 year old braised copper in my house is fine and no issues. So it generally lasts the longest and is proven.
 
Posts: 15765 | Registered: June 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Sharkbite fittings are not to code around here. Soldered or bust. Of course, it's also against code for a homeowner to do things like replace his own water heater around here.

I'm not sure I'd put one in a wall, but I don't have a problem with them personally.


"In order to understand recursion, you must first learn the principle of recursion."
 
Posts: 2592 | Location: Memphis, TN | Registered: August 23, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Get my pies
outta the oven!

Picture of PASig
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My neighbor told me that PEX is a bad idea because it allows bacteria to build up in the lines?

Has anyone ever heard this one? He's a fan of Sharkbite on copper (if installed properly) but says he would never put any PEX in his own house.


 
Posts: 22940 | Location: Pennsylvania | Registered: November 12, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
fugitive from reality
Picture of SgtGold
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Copper is naturally anti microbial. Anything iron, steel, or plastic can allow organic material growth and has to rely on active chemical treatment and consfant flow to keep organics in check.


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Posts: 5701 | Location: Newyorkistan | Registered: March 28, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
quarter MOA visionary
Picture of smschulz
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quote:
Originally posted by PASig:
My neighbor told me that PEX is a bad idea because it allows bacteria to build up in the lines?

Has anyone ever heard this one? He's a fan of Sharkbite on copper (if installed properly) but says he would never put any PEX in his own house.


Yeah, I wouldn't be considering his advice in the future. Frown
 
Posts: 14999 | Location: Houston, TX | Registered: June 11, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Muzzle flash
aficionado
Picture of flashguy
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quote:
Originally posted by whanson_wi:
I think it would be like rubber washers in a valve - inside the house, 30 years with no problem.
In the walls, I'd be concerned with a 30-year life. A lot of houses are in use for longer than that.

flashguy




Texan by choice, not accident of birth

When they ask me, "Paper or plastic?" I just say, "Doesn't matter to me. I am bi-sacksual."
 
Posts: 19888 | Location: Dallas, TX | Registered: May 08, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by PASig:
My neighbor told me that PEX is a bad idea because it allows bacteria to build up in the lines?

Has anyone ever heard this one? He's a fan of Sharkbite on copper (if installed properly) but says he would never put any PEX in his own house.


Yes, bacteria and algae can grow inside of it. If you have well water and it sits for weeks and weeks with no use. You usually don't have a bacteria issue with city water.
 
Posts: 15765 | Registered: June 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of bigmule
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Id use shark bites for a temp fix, nothing else.

There are a few projects I know of that have suffered greatly from the
“Exclusive Use”, of shark bites fittings.

There is nothing permanent about a compression fitting.


Back from burning bridges, made lots of friends.
 
Posts: 2085 | Location: The commonwealth of the saftey pin..  | Registered: July 31, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Big Stack
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Not just for this reason, but including it, I wonder what all the houses built since the '90's or so are going to be like when they get to the 40-50 YO range?

quote:
Originally posted by flashguy:
quote:
Originally posted by whanson_wi:
I think it would be like rubber washers in a valve - inside the house, 30 years with no problem.
In the walls, I'd be concerned with a 30-year life. A lot of houses are in use for longer than that.

flashguy
 
Posts: 17844 | Registered: November 05, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of myrottiety
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I redid the kitchen at my old house 8+ years ago. I had one joint no matter how many times I soldered it. Would have a slow leak. After blowing the lines and soldering the joint 12+ times. A slew of cuss words later. I hit the Home depot. On shark bite later the joint was leak free. Still is to this day.

I only know because my brother in law is living there now.




Train how you intend to Fight

Remember - Training is not sparring. Sparring is not fighting. Fighting is not combat.
 
Posts: 7482 | Location: Alpharetta, GA | Registered: August 04, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Get my pies
outta the oven!

Picture of PASig
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I had this plumber come today and replace my main cold water shut off valve in the basement as I had put in a new powder room sink and had the water off to change out supply valves and the crusty old gate valve (most likely 66 years old along with the house) on the main shut off wouldn't stop leaking on me after I turned the water back on.

He put on a new ball valve and also used one of these couplers, another Nibco pressure fitting. I looked up how they actually go on and was impressed to see that they crimp these on with what looks like a small Jaws of Life looking type tool, pneumatic and battery powered. Looks like it crimps the shit out of those fittings which are rated up to 200 psi:



 
Posts: 22940 | Location: Pennsylvania | Registered: November 12, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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^^^ Yes, GTG. ProPress system.

Burnham boiler sections are pressed together with push nipples, metal to metal contact with no O-rings.

I pulled out an old, coal fired Weil McLain boiler this Summer. Was still in use heating the home. Was converted to natural gas many years ago. The sections where put together using push nipples. Mot a one was leaking after all the years of use. All the expanding/contracting/corrosion/etc. it was still water tight.




 
Posts: 7419 | Registered: October 15, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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