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Irma - everyone has gone nuts Login/Join 
Nature is full of
magnificent creatures
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by FlyingScot:
my parents in the keys are saying that evacuations will likely be called tomorrow or Wednesday- 3 days to evacuate keys.


I did that once, from Marathon key to Orlando, shortly before Andrew hit. It was 15 mph all night until about Deerfield Beach, IIRC. They are smart to leave early. It was nuts.
 
Posts: 4610 | Registered: March 24, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Stangosaurus Rex
Picture of Tommydogg
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I might load all my pistole into the cases and bag my rifles ahead of time.


___________________________
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Beth Greene
 
Posts: 6595 | Location: South Florida | Registered: January 09, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of FlyingScot
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I fuel up the boat as well as my cans - rec90 only. 1 good thing with these is neighbors and friends helping each other out - I'm always busy, and always good to see everyone chip in. Spoke to my dad - he and my mom live on a boat in Islamorada. They have a Trailer they are loading up and heading this way.

Problem here and is where do you go? This storm likely runs the length of the state, a crapshoot. Everyone is coming my to my place, we built it for 165+ so we will see. Good luck and here is hoping we prepare in vain and it hooks to sea.





“Freedom is something that dies unless it's used.”

Hunter S. Thompson
 
Posts: 1209 | Location: South Florida | Registered: December 24, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
That rug really tied
the room together.
Picture of bubbatime
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It is mass pandemonium in south Florida right now. No plywood, batteries, water, bread, generators, gas cans, bread available. Lines at the gas stations.


______________________________________________________
Often times a very small man can cast a very large shadow
 
Posts: 3833 | Location: Floriduh | Registered: October 16, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Essayons
Picture of SapperSteel
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by bubbatime:
It is mass pandemonium in south Florida right now. No plywood, batteries, water, bread, generators, gas cans, bread available. Lines at the gas stations.


I don't get this. It's not like Florida has never been hit by a bad hurricane before. People who live there should BE PREPARED for this; why aren't they?

Nobody in Florida was ever a boy scout?


Thanks,

Sap
 
Posts: 3088 | Location: Arimo, Idaho | Registered: February 03, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
A Grateful American
Picture of sigmonkey
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Stuff ages.

Batteries, water, gas, and so forth.

We used to keep the "hurricane stash" of various canned goods, and staples.

Found that if we did not consume and rotate, they would perish rapidly.

Then given more than 10 years, some people stop the rotation/replenish and next thing you know, BAM! there's a monster spinning up yo' back do'.

So, do you have supply of dirt and water to help fight against wildfire? Fill your gas tank before it drops past 3/4? Have a wad of cash, clothes and essentials packed and ready to go in case you have to bug out?

Easy to sit back and ridicule others.

Better to spend your time with helpful tips or well wishes on your bretheren and sisteren in the hinterlands where you are not, than to be smug while they deal with a shitstorm.

But, then, I tend to have a stick up my ass once and a while about such things.




"the meaning of life, is to give life meaning" I could explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.
 
Posts: 35827 | Location: My Happy Little Tire Swing | Registered: December 20, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Savor the limelight
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It doesn't help that the Governor has already declared a state of emergency. Maybe all 27 million of us should just head to Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota. I'll bet they'll be as thrilled to see us as we willll be to see them in November.
 
Posts: 3132 | Location: SWFL | Registered: October 10, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
E tan e epi tas
Picture of cslinger
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Could you not start filling every container you have with water. As things get closer fill all the tubs etc.?

I mean it's good to keep water on hand but when you have prep time / lead up water seems to be the least difficult to stockpile.

Not judging just suggesting.


"Guns are tools. The only weapon ever created was man."
 
Posts: 2823 | Location: Nashville, TN | Registered: July 25, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
A Grateful American
Picture of sigmonkey
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by trapper189:
It doesn't help that the Governor has already declared a state of emergency. Maybe all 27 million of us should just head to Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota. I'll bet they'll be as thrilled to see us as we willll be to see them in November.


Declaring State of Emergency facilitates the release of specific federal funds and puts other mechanisms in motion to deal with the impact of the storm, such as utilities companies in near states pre-positioning and allocating resources that will be needed as soon as possible after the storm passes.

It is exploiting the protocols in a manner that makes recovery and restoration of essential services much quicker.

Or, we could wait until the storm has made landfall and moved out of the area and then try to have resources and responders "dig in" the the affected areas, when there is no power, impassable roads and damaged infrastructure as well as a pile of people scrambling to make do.

Why people are so negative about everything under the sun perplexes me more and more.

And I am pretty much always on the expectation that the worst is to come form any and all quarters, but damn, some folks just can't wait to piss and moan about anything that comes along.





"the meaning of life, is to give life meaning" I could explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.
 
Posts: 35827 | Location: My Happy Little Tire Swing | Registered: December 20, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
It's pronounced just
the way it's spelled
posted Hide Post
I lived in South Florida for 6 years. Better people get prepared ahead of time rather than waiting until the last minute (like they usually do) before the hurricane makes landfall. I've never understood the cleaning the stores out of items that need refrigeration, like milk. I would usually fill up extra gas cans about a week ahead of time, make sure the cars were full up, and had enough drinking water for at least 72 hours stored in containers. A generator is a good idea, as is a chainsaw (trees fall across roads). The best idea is to evacuate ahead of time. Why stay and have no power, water, etc., and possibly need to be rescued?? Good for the Governor declaring an emergency, not only does it get people preparing, it also it allows the tolls to be suspended on the highways, and all the lanes to be going north for evacuation.
 
Posts: 622 | Location: Arid Zone A | Registered: February 14, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Corgis Rock
Picture of Icabod
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Tampa is a suggested category 6 hurricane site:

"Hurricanes Patricia and Wilma featured winds well above the 157-mph criteria of a Category 5 hurricane. But should either of those storms be considered a Category 6?

The only way that is possible is if the National Hurricane Center (NHC) decides in the future to adjust its Saffir-Simpson Scale.

(MORE: Does the Saffir-Simpson Scale Need an Improvement?)

Future Category 6 Hurricanes?

In his blog post, Masters analyzes research that was published in Natural Climate Change in 2015 by Kerry Emanuel of MIT and Ning Lin of Princeton University.

The scientists ran hurricane models within six different global climate models, and the results were mind-boggling.

The results showed that three vulnerable areas of the world are at risk for a "high-end" Category 5 tropical cyclone by the end of the 21st century due to the Earth's changing climate: Tampa, Florida; Cairns, Australia; and the Persian Gulf.

These potential Category 6 hurricanes may be up to 14 times more likely by 2100, according to the study.

The worst-case potential future hurricane put out by the climate models for the Tampa Bay area is unlike anything ever seen – maximum sustained winds of 233 mph with a minimum central pressure of 830 millibars, traveling parallel along Florida's Gulf Coast, producing a devastating 36-foot storm surge.

Those wind speeds are comparable to the EF5 tornado that destroyed Joplin, Missouri, in May 2011, except the damage would be along a swath 22 miles wide rather than only a few hundred yards."
https://weather.com/storms/hur...r-simpson-wind-scale



“The best teacher is not the one who knows most but the one who is most capable of reducing knowledge to that simple compound of the obvious and wonderful.”
― H.L. Mencken
 
Posts: 4636 | Location: Outside Seattle | Registered: November 29, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Ironmike57:
I went to 4 different Wal-Mart's today looking for water. All gone. I scored 15 gallons at a local Publix.

It seems that all of the water went to Texas.



quote:
Originally posted by FlyingScot:
So yes, this looks to be a problem for Florida. Good news, everyone is taking it seriously. Bad news, going to the store, driving, trying to buy bread - good luck. Store shelves are emptying quickly and yo could not get me near a Home Depot.

Here's hoping this thing goes away - latest Euro and GFS have this as a 890 millibar storm coming up the east coast. That would not be good.


Ummmmmm, you do know that if you get clean containers, you can fill them up with the city water that's currently coming out of your faucet and drink it if the hurricane hits?
 
Posts: 14300 | Registered: June 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Tinker Sailor Soldier Pie
Picture of Balzé Halzé
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Icabod:
Tampa is a suggested category 6 hurricane site:

"Hurricanes Patricia and Wilma featured winds well above the 157-mph criteria of a Category 5 hurricane. But should either of those storms be considered a Category 6?

The only way that is possible is if the National Hurricane Center (NHC) decides in the future to adjust its Saffir-Simpson Scale.

(MORE: Does the Saffir-Simpson Scale Need an Improvement?)

Future Category 6 Hurricanes?

In his blog post, Masters analyzes research that was published in Natural Climate Change in 2015 by Kerry Emanuel of MIT and Ning Lin of Princeton University.

The scientists ran hurricane models within six different global climate models, and the results were mind-boggling.

The results showed that three vulnerable areas of the world are at risk for a "high-end" Category 5 tropical cyclone by the end of the 21st century due to the Earth's changing climate: Tampa, Florida; Cairns, Australia; and the Persian Gulf.

These potential Category 6 hurricanes may be up to 14 times more likely by 2100, according to the study.

The worst-case potential future hurricane put out by the climate models for the Tampa Bay area is unlike anything ever seen – maximum sustained winds of 233 mph with a minimum central pressure of 830 millibars, traveling parallel along Florida's Gulf Coast, producing a devastating 36-foot storm surge.

Those wind speeds are comparable to the EF5 tornado that destroyed Joplin, Missouri, in May 2011, except the damage would be along a swath 22 miles wide rather than only a few hundred yards."
https://weather.com/storms/hur...r-simpson-wind-scale


Pardon me while I give that article a giant eye roll. Roll Eyes


~Alan

Acta Non Verba
NRA Life Member (Endowment)
Family, Guns, Country

"My guns are always loaded."
~R.G. Justified

What whiskey will not cure, there is no cure.
 
Posts: 17615 | Location: Out of Jersey, Into Utah | Registered: October 29, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by sigmonkey:
Stuff ages.

Batteries, water, gas, and so forth.

We used to keep the "hurricane stash" of various canned goods, and staples.

Found that if we did not consume and rotate, they would perish rapidly.

Then given more than 10 years, some people stop the rotation/replenish and next thing you know, BAM! there's a monster spinning up yo' back do'.

So, do you have supply of dirt and water to help fight against wildfire? Fill your gas tank before it drops past 3/4? Have a wad of cash, clothes and essentials packed and ready to go in case you have to bug out?

Easy to sit back and ridicule others.

Better to spend your time with helpful tips or well wishes on your bretheren and sisteren in the hinterlands where you are not, than to be smug while they deal with a shitstorm.

But, then, I tend to have a stick up my ass once and a while about such things.


I live in South Florida and always keep a lot of water on hand. When I get down to 2-40 1/2 liter bottle cases of water I go to Costco and buy 5 more cases. Plenty of batteries, propane, and charcoal (for cooking on hand at all times), cash on hand, and food in the freezer as well as the cupboard.....it's really not that hard to do and rotate through it.... I don't keep gas on hand but will keep my fuel tank as full as possible leading up to the storm. But I have plenty of boats I manage that have several hundred gallons of gas in each that I could syphon out of one of them if I needed to.

Honestly for $200 in inventory of stuff you normally consume and rotate through you can be pretty ready at all times, then just work through the stuff once hurricane season is over.....
 
Posts: 14300 | Registered: June 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Bodhisattva
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by trapper189:
It doesn't help that the Governor has already declared a state of emergency. Maybe all 27 million of us should just head to Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota. I'll bet they'll be as thrilled to see us as we willll be to see them in November.


Come on up. We could use the money.
 
Posts: 10840 | Location: Michigan | Registered: July 01, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of Ironmike57
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Yep. We do not drink the tap water in Florida. Never have.

We have always been prepared since Andrew. With Irma, the craziness has started early.



Ummmmmm, you do know that if you get clean containers, you can fill them up with the city water that's currently coming out of your faucet and drink it if the hurricane hits?[/QUOTE]
 
Posts: 925 | Location: Hollywood,Florida | Registered: July 26, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of Ironmike57
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This is exactly what we do.

Honestly for $200 in inventory of stuff you normally consume and rotate through you can be pretty ready at all times, then just work through the stuff once hurricane season is over.....[/QUOTE]
 
Posts: 925 | Location: Hollywood,Florida | Registered: July 26, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
Picture of furlough
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Fredward:
In a super duper emergency, you can get water out of your water heater. There's a good 30 to 50 readily available.


Yeah, but be smart. I was in Del Rio, TX when a tropical storm parked over us in 1998. Wiped out the city water pumps and killed a lot of people.

Some geniuses figured out they had water in their water heater and drained it - but forgot to turn off the heating element. Easy way to burn your house down, especially if you have an old, not so insulated water heater.

Be careful out there guys.


----------------------------------
This and no other is the root from which a tyrant springs; when he first appears above ground he is a protector.
Plato
 
Posts: 1144 | Location: Way south Texas | Registered: June 13, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Savor the limelight
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by sigmonkey:

Declaring State of Emergency facilitates the release of specific federal funds and puts other mechanisms in motion to deal with the impact of the storm, such as utilities companies in near states pre-positioning and allocating resources that will be needed as soon as possible after the storm passes.

It is exploiting the protocols in a manner that makes recovery and restoration of essential services much quicker.

Or, we could wait until the storm has made landfall and moved out of the area and then try to have resources and responders "dig in" the the affected areas, when there is no power, impassable roads and damaged infrastructure as well as a pile of people scrambling to make do.

Why people are so negative about everything under the sun perplexes me more and more.

And I am pretty much always on the expectation that the worst is to come form any and all quarters, but damn, some folks just can't wait to piss and moan about anything that comes along.



I understand what the purpose of the declaration is. We are days away from knowing with good certainty where this storm is going and there will be a few days after that to prepare. Declaring a state of emergency that early does not make anything easier, better, simpler, etc. The only thing it does is create chaos for 27 million people. No need to wait until landfall, a couple days out when there is a better understanding where land fall will be likely.

I'm not saying people shouldn't be prepared or get prepared now, but panic never makes any situation better. I glad I don't have to participate in it. I've been prepared for months now.

quote:
Originally posted by nukeandpave:


Come on up. We could use the money.


You say that now, but wait until the roads are inundated with us and your daily commutes take three times longer. I'm saying this tongue in cheek of course. We actually just got back from Michigan a few weeks ago. My wife already spent plenty in Traverse City and Petosky. We left early in the morning, her idea, but it also meant we could drive past the Birch Run outlets and Frankenmuth since nothing was open yet.
 
Posts: 3132 | Location: SWFL | Registered: October 10, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
That rug really tied
the room together.
Picture of bubbatime
posted Hide Post
Category 5 with 175 mph winds now !!!!


______________________________________________________
Often times a very small man can cast a very large shadow
 
Posts: 3833 | Location: Floriduh | Registered: October 16, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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