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Ds don’t want the Rs to hobble new Wis. D governor Login/Join 
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posted
This is B. S. It’s time for the Rs to learn to play hardball – just as the Ds have done forever.

“MADISON, Wis. (AP) — A bipartisan group of political figures appealed to Gov. Scott Walker on Thursday to avoid staining his legacy and behaving like a sore loser by signing legislation that would weaken the powers of the Democrat who defeated him…”

https://apnews.com/7b001b3a2c6547b4b334bd26c9d146ad




Note to self: Don’t clutter threads with gratuitous posts.
 
Posts: 3772 | Location: San Diego | Registered: July 26, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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If the R's give in, it is just Charlie Brown kicking the football held by Lucy again.
 
Posts: 5943 | Registered: September 26, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Glorious SPAM!
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Fuck'em. #Resist
 
Posts: 8569 | Registered: June 13, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The GOP is doing the same thing in Michigan. Way to go!!

https://www.reuters.com/articl...-power-idUSKBN1O5289

Michigan Republicans following Wisconsin's lead in curbing Democrats' power

Joseph Ax
POLITICS DECEMBER 6, 2018 / 12:42 PM / UPDATED 2 HOURS AGO

(Reuters) - A day after Wisconsin Republicans approved a package of bills intended to restrict the powers of incoming Democratic leaders, Republican lawmakers in Michigan advanced a similar effort despite an outcry from Democrats.

The Michigan state Senate voted on Thursday to strip the power to oversee campaign finance from the newly elected Democratic secretary of state, Jocelyn Benson, instead handing the authority to a bipartisan commission.

The vote came after the state House of Representatives on Wednesday passed a bill that would allow lawmakers to sidestep the attorney general in litigation involving the state.

Meanwhile, North Carolina’s Republican-led state Senate approved a new strict voter identification law on Thursday, after the state Assembly did the same on Wednesday. Republicans have rushed to pass that bill before January, when they will lose the legislative supermajority allowing them to overturn Democratic Governor Roy Cooper’s veto.

In each case, Democrats have cried foul, arguing that the last-minute maneuvering ignores the will of the voters. Republicans in both Michigan and Wisconsin will see eight years of total control of state government end in January, when Democrats take over the governor’s mansions and other top executive posts.

“This power grab is a deliberate attempt by legislative Republicans to silence the voices of the 4.3 million Michiganders that made their choice clear in the last election,” Michigan Representative Christine Greig, who will become the Democratic minority leader in the House in January, said in a statement on Wednesday.

Republicans in Michigan and Wisconsin have defended the laws as good-faith efforts to improve state government. In North Carolina, where voters in November approved a voter ID constitutional amendment, Republicans said they were simply implementing the people’s will.

The measure comes as the state is investigating alleged mishandling of absentee ballots by political operatives.

Wisconsin Republicans passed a raft of bills that would allow lawmakers, rather than the attorney general, to decide whether to withdraw the state from lawsuits. That measure is intended to stop Governor-elect Tony Evers and Attorney General-elect Josh Kaul, both Democrats, from following through on campaign promises to end Wisconsin’s challenge to the federal healthcare law known as Obamacare.

Republican Governor Scott Walker has indicated he will sign the bills before leaving office at the end of December, though his office said on Thursday he was reviewing the legislation. Democrats expect to challenge some of the bills in court.

In Michigan, the Republican-led legislature on Wednesday hollowed out minimum wage and sick leave laws, three months after it passed those statutes as part of a political strategy to keep them from appearing on the ballot as a voter referendum. That move in September made it easier for Republicans to alter the laws after November’s election, though Democrats have vowed to sue.

The legislature is also expected to pass a law allowing it to intervene in litigation involving the state, a power normally reserved for the attorney general’s office, which will be occupied by a Democrat starting next month.


Reporting by Joseph Ax; Editing by Scott Malone and Tom Brown
 
Posts: 13439 | Location: Eastern Iowa | Registered: May 21, 2000Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The Dems whine about a Republican possibly "behaving like a sore loser", even though he hasn't done so yet, while there are how many Democrats who lost that demanded recounts, called the elections they didn't win "unfair", were exceedingly ungracious to the winner in the rare instances they did acknowledge losing, etc.

I wonder if the hypocrisy truly does escape them.




 
Posts: 3910 | Location: Arkansas | Registered: September 04, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The Dems play all kinds of games, may as well join them.

I say once Evers is the WI Gov, the State legislators hide out in IL.

Should be interesting to watch, WI, IL, and MI.
 
Posts: 3527 | Location: WI | Registered: February 29, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by TigerDore:
If the R's give in, it is just Charlie Brown kicking the football held by Lucy again.

R's are stupid like that, though as inidividuals their collective avg IQ is superior to your average democrat who's so dumb they don't even realize their limitations). I wish R's would pull up their sleeves and pay serious hard ball as you said. If I were a R on the hill I would put my frustration to better use and tell my constituents how stupid and morally bereft demos are as individuals and collectively and come up with a plan to conduct serious political war.




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Posts: 6406 | Location: Nowhere the constitution is not honored | Registered: February 01, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I like our newly elected governor's approach to transitioning.

https://www.ktuu.com/content/n...apply-500875301.html

Push back as Dunleavy asks for all at-will state employee resignations

By Sean Maguire & the Associated Press | Posted: Mon 3:42 PM, Nov 19, 2018 | Updated: Mon 7:03 PM, Nov 19, 2018

ANCHORAGE (KTUU) - There has been pushback by some to Gov. - elect Mike Dunleavy’s request that all at-will state employees submit resignation letters before they can re-apply for their jobs and continue working under his administration.

The pushback includes Gov. Bill Walker, who says he “strongly advised” Dunleavy against the move during a meeting with the transition team.

“Governor-elect Mike Dunleavy’s call for the resignation of nearly all exempt employees, on the other hand, is creating anxiety and uncertainty for committed, nonpolitical public servants such as prosecutors who work tirelessly to keep our state running,” Walker said in a written statement over the weekend.

Director of Psychiatry at the Alaska Psychiatric Institute, Dr. Andrew Blanford, wrote a letter to the editor of The Anchorage Daily News on Monday saying he will not be offering his resignation.

“Whereas it might seem like a simple matter to offer my resignation with the likelihood of being retained, this symbolic gesture of deference doesn’t settle well with me,” wrote Blanford. “The state of Alaska hired me for my expertise, not my political allegiance. My moral allegiance is to the mentally ill and the staff who care for them.”


“If an at-will employee declines the request to submit a letter of resignation, we will take that as evidence they do not wish to serve in the Dunleavy Administration,” wrote Dunleavy’s chief of staff, Tuckerman Babcock in a statement Monday.

“It’s a real blow to morale, and I think it’s detrimental,” said Democrat Sen. Bill Wielechowski, D - Anchorage. “The fact that you have the administration saying, "If you don’t turn in your resignation, we’re going to fire you, I think that’s deeply, deeply troubling."”

Wielechowski said he had heard a lot of concern from people across his district. He compared the process to something akin to a “loyalty pledge,” which is “deeply troubling to Alaskans.”

An employee at the Department of Natural Resources, who wishes to remain anonymous, told Channel 2 that many exempt and partially-exempt staff at the office have expressed deep concern over the transition team’s request.

Over the weekend, some state workers also took to social media to share their frustration. On the Facebook page, “Concerned State of Alaska Employees,” some said the move was unfair to prosecutors while others questioned whether it was a misguided attempt to resolve the budget deficit.


Neither Dunleavy nor Babcock were available to speak Monday but the transition team released a statement on behalf of Babcock.

“This is not necessarily the process for reducing the number of State employees. This is more to remind all at-will employees that they work for the people of Alaska,” read the statement. “We are confident that each at-will employee can find a few minutes to submit a letter of resignation to the new governor and let us know if he/she wishes to continue as an at-will public servant.”

The precise number of at-will employees who have received the request remains unclear, even to Dunleavy himself.

“We do not know exactly how many employees this affects, and did not ask. It is a matter of principle, not numbers,” wrote Babcock. “When the people elect a new governor, all at-will employees should submit a letter of resignation. It is a reminder to us all that as at-will employees, we serve the public, and the public elects the chief executive, the governor.”


The Department of Administration is working to clarify the numbers of exempt and partially-exempt employees who have been asked to submit resignation letters before the Nov. 30 cut-off.

A special assistant to the Commissioner of the Department of Administration, Minta Montalbo, said more information would be released Monday afternoon, including a list of answers to frequently asked questions for state employees.

Across the state government, many departments were unaware how many of their staff have been impacted.

Jonathon Taylor, a spokesperson for the Department of Public Safety, said the department does not know “precisely how many” exempt and partially-exempt employees have been asked to send in resignation letters.

Over at the Department of Education, Erin Hardin, a public information officer, said she didn’t know which staff had received an email from the incoming administration. “Our employees understand this is a time of transition, and remain focused on serving the needs of our students across the state,” wrote Hardin in an email to Channel 2.

Elizabeth Bluemink, a spokesperson for the Department of Natural Resources, wrote in an email that she does “not have the complete numbers and positions at present.”

At the Department of Health and Social Services, spokesperson Clinton Bennett, recommended that Channel 2 reach out to the transition team: “They are the ones who sent out the letters so they would know how many people would be impacted as well as how many emails were sent out.”

The Associated Press reported Saturday that Attorney General Jahna Lindemuth says she would be "greatly surprised" if the Department of Law looks significantly different after Dunleavy's administration is sworn-in.

Lindemuth explained that the governor can direct the attorney general to hire or fire department employees. But she says such decisions are not to be made without the advice of the attorney general on how that would affect the department's ability to carry out its work.

She says she sensed "no animus" toward the department in speaking with Dunleavy and his chief of staff, according to the Associated Press.

Karen Montoya, communications director with Department of Fish and Game, writes that there are a total of 55 exempt and partially exempt employees in that department, but she "cannot guarantee that everyone has received letters."

Spokesperson for the Department of Transportation, Shannon McCarthy, wrote that she is trying to source a list of employees impacted but that "it's not very many."

A public information officer with the Department of Environmental Conservation, Laura Achee, confirmed that nine exempt and partially exempt employees received the memo. Achee listed the nine employees out of 485 total who received requests to submit resignation letters:

- Commissioner Larry Hartig
- Deputy Commissioner Alice Edwards
- Administrative Services Division Director Jeff Rogers
- Air Division Director Denise Koch
- Environmental Health Division Director Christina Carpenter
- Spill Prevention and Response Division Director Kristin Ryan
- Water Division Director Andrew Sayers-Fay
- Special Assistant Alida Bus
- Executive Secretary Claire Fishwick

The Department of Law, the Department of Revenue and the Office of the Governor did not respond to Channel 2's requests for how many employees had received resignation requests in time for this story's first publication. It will be updated when we hear back from them.




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Posts: 10354 | Location: Anchorage, AK | Registered: September 12, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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We are watching this closely in Wisconsin.

Even though we narrowly lost the Governorship, we have strong majorities in the state senate and house so there is no reason not to move forward with the legislation.

The irony of it all is that the same liberals (and their media accomplices) claiming that we are "sore losers" were the ones championing the recall effort against Walker.

The media hypocrisy has no boundaries in Wisconsin......
 
Posts: 105 | Registered: January 26, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I know I'm likely going to get flamed for this, but I don't like or agree with this course of action by Republicans. The people of these states elected who they want running things. It is inappropriate for any group to subvert the authority and responsibilities of these newly elected officials. People in these states should benefit from or suffer from the actions of the people they elect. Every Dem elected now has a built in excuse for their failure to accomplish anything during their term.

People should get and have to deal with the government they elect. Otherwise there's never a reason for them to change course.


-----------------------------
Guns are awesome because they shoot solid lead freedom. Every man should have several guns. And several dogs, because a man with a cat is a woman. Kurt Schlichter
 
Posts: 27066 | Location: Orlando, FL | Registered: April 30, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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"A bipartisan group of political figures appealed to Gov. Scott Walker..."
my Aunt Annie's fanny.

Evers is showing how he will perform an Governor by whining before he is even sworn in. It's gonna be a shitshow.

Walker is young enough to come back after we watch Evers flop around for a couple years.
 
Posts: 861 | Location: WI | Registered: July 07, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Just hope I can afford the next four years under Evers as he’s gunna tax the everloving shit out of us if possible.



“I won't be wronged. I won't be insulted. I won't be laid a-hand on. I don't do these things to other people, and I require the same from them.”
 
Posts: 2493 | Location: SE WI | Registered: October 07, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by bigdeal:
I know I'm likely going to get flamed for this, but I don't like or agree with this course of action by Republicans. The people of these states elected who they want running things. It is inappropriate for any group to subvert the authority and responsibilities of these newly elected officials. People in these states should benefit from or suffer from the actions of the people they elect. Every Dem elected now has a built in excuse for their failure to accomplish anything during their term.

People should get and have to deal with the government they elect. Otherwise there's never a reason for them to change course.


Yeah, well, I don't exactly trust that the election of Evers was anything but illegitimate.

As Bill the Butcher had asked, "Who elected him?"


~Alan

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What whiskey will not cure, there is no cure.
 
Posts: 20836 | Location: Out of Jersey, Into Utah | Registered: October 29, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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