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Roy Halladay Dies in Plane Crash in Gulf of Mexico Login/Join 
A Grateful American
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BRE!!!!

IT'S SAMMICH TIME!




"the meaning of life, is to give life meaning" I could explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.
 
Posts: 36268 | Location: My Happy Little Tire Swing | Registered: December 20, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of arabiancowboy
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quote:
Originally posted by jimmy123x:
quote:
Originally posted by V-Tail:
quote:
Originally posted by jimmy123x:
Yes, it can be different and is good practice. BUT, it is pretty routine to fly in and out of the same airport and to go for a 1 hour spin to nowhere, than it is to navigate and fly cross country or to a different country, figuring out your fuel stops and routes, and landing and taking off at different airports,FBOs. with different sized runways, through different weather patterns, air traffic patterns and so forth and so on, rather than going up for an hour in a circle every sunny Saturday.
Just kind of curious... What are your numbers?

How much PIC time do you have logged? How much actual instrument time as PIC? How much cross country time? Do you have a high performance endorsement? Complex endorsement?

Inquiring minds want to know. Smile


I am not a pilot. However, I have flown in the second seat of well over a 100 private planes.....everything from a steerman biplane to a T6 Texan, to a Lake seaplane, to a otter on floats, TBM 850, numerous Cessnas from 150's to 412's to several single pilot private jets. Taking off and landing from water, grass runways, airports etc. Everything from a 1 hour flight in circles taking off and landing at the same airport to flying cross country and to various other countries and islands. I've flown with dozens of different pilots and many of them instructors. There are some I would NEVER fly with again. One of those being my female cousin who actually flew in the Amelia Earhardt cross country womans pilot race (who once landed at an airport that had been closed for years by accident instead of the correct airport.

There is a totally different set of circumstances and planning when it comes to flying cross country or to another country, than there is to simply take off and fly for an hour and land at the same airport with the same weather. There are a totally different set of circumstances between flying IFR and VFR. Same goes for flying in and out of various countries.

I'm not saying that someone who simply flies in and out of the same airport can't be a very good pilot. Just that there are a total different set of circumstances when you're flying cross country or just up in the air for an hour taking off and landing at the same airport. Just like I wouldn't trust your typical G 550 pilot to fly a Super Cub all over the Bush (Alaska) successfully without dieing in the first few months. Or a Bush pilot that flies a Super Cub in Alaska to Fly a G550 from Chicago into St. Barts.


So different missions are different is basically what you’re saying? Copy. Comparing unlike types of anything is a futile endeavor, but having done a wide variety of things I think you’re making too many assumptions to arrive at any worthwhile conclusions.

Flying circles can be harder that you might think. Like sigmonkey, I’ve found doing those things Any Time, Any Place can be quite a demanding skill set.
 
Posts: 1889 | Registered: May 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
On the DL
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Originally posted by arabiancowboy:
So different missions are different is basically what you’re saying? Copy.
Big Grin



A mind is a terrible thing.
 
Posts: 16248 | Location: Central Florida (near Orlando) | Registered: January 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by RHINOWSO:
Guppy meet Jimmy, Jimmy meet Guppy.

Honestly, I think you two will get along MARVELOUSLY.


You really are a dick. It's getting old.
 
Posts: 1426 | Registered: September 13, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by jimmy123x:

Landing on water is a whole nother experience and planning when you're traveling especially when you're flying into various islands and need calmer water to land and no runways around. If it were easy or routine, Roy Halladay would still be alive.


You understand that most of those responding to you are experienced instructors, right? You already stated that you're not a pilot, and yet presume to lecture regarding what you don't know and aren't qualified to do. Why is that?

Yes, landing on water is both easy and routine, which is why a seaplane rating is one of the easiest (and most fun) of all pilot certifications to get.

Halladay might be alive had he shown more common sens, and exercised better judgement.
 
Posts: 1426 | Registered: September 13, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by sigmonkey:
BRE!!!!

IT'S SAMMICH TIME!





A mind is a terrible thing.
 
Posts: 16248 | Location: Central Florida (near Orlando) | Registered: January 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
thin skin can't win
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And, on and on.


If I keep opening this thread, eventually I'll wish I was with ol' Roy.



You only have integrity once. - imprezaguy02

 
Posts: 7660 | Location: Madison, MS | Registered: December 10, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by sns3guppy:
quote:
Originally posted by jimmy123x:

Landing on water is a whole nother experience and planning when you're traveling especially when you're flying into various islands and need calmer water to land and no runways around. If it were easy or routine, Roy Halladay would still be alive.


You understand that most of those responding to you are experienced instructors, right? You already stated that you're not a pilot, and yet presume to lecture regarding what you don't know and aren't qualified to do. Why is that?

Yes, landing on water is both easy and routine, which is why a seaplane rating is one of the easiest (and most fun) of all pilot certifications to get.

Halladay might be alive had he shown more common sens, and exercised better judgement.


I am NOT lecturing anyone. I'm just saying that it's different. Many aspects are different. Experience in one area does not necessarily mean you have experience in others. For example, there are TONS of very good pilots that wouldn't dare land and take off in St. Barts.

Different experience is different. Is all I am saying.
 
Posts: 14795 | Registered: June 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by Georgeair:
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And, on and on.


If I keep opening this thread, eventually I'll wish I was with ol' Roy.


Big Grin Big Grin


------------------------------
Place your clothes and weapons where you can find them in the dark.

“If in winning a race, you lose the respect of your fellow competitors, then you have won nothing” - Paul Elvstrom "The Great Dane" 1928 - 2016
 
Posts: 2138 | Location: Wichita, Kansas | Registered: March 27, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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there are TONS of very good pilots that wouldn't dare land and take off in St. Barts.
How many pilots does it take, to make a ton of them?



A mind is a terrible thing.
 
Posts: 16248 | Location: Central Florida (near Orlando) | Registered: January 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
thin skin can't win
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Originally posted by V-Tail:
quote:
there are TONS of very good pilots that wouldn't dare land and take off in St. Barts.
How many pilots does it take, to make a ton of them?

All the ones in boats.



You only have integrity once. - imprezaguy02

 
Posts: 7660 | Location: Madison, MS | Registered: December 10, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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It’s runway is a little over 2100’, it’s not that short, most Gen Av can handle that, piece of cake in a twin otter.


"Hold my beer.....Watch this".
 
Posts: 5410 | Location: Republic of Texas | Registered: April 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Slight drift...

Halladay’s service is on MLB network now.




Luckily, I have enough willpower to control the driving ambition that rages within me.

When you had the votes, we did things your way. Now, we have the votes and you will be doing things our way. This lesson in political reality from Lyndon B. Johnson

"Some things are apparent. Where government moves in, community retreats, civil society disintegrates and our ability to control our own destiny atrophies. The result is: families under siege; war in the streets; unapologetic expropriation of property; the precipitous decline of the rule of law; the rapid rise of corruption; the loss of civility and the triumph of deceit. The result is a debased, debauched culture which finds moral depravity entertaining and virtue contemptible." - Justice Janice Rogers Brown
 
Posts: 42934 | Location: Texas hill country | Registered: July 04, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Quoted without comment:
quote:
Originally posted by jimmy123x:
I am not a pilot.
quote:
Originally posted by jimmy123x:
Experience in one area does not necessarily mean you have experience in others.



A mind is a terrible thing.
 
Posts: 16248 | Location: Central Florida (near Orlando) | Registered: January 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by nighthawk:
It’s runway is a little over 2100’, it’s not that short, most Gen Av can handle that, piece of cake in a twin otter.


I guess our "INSTRUCTORS" here have no knowledge of landing on St. Barts. I guess that comes into those that fly around in circles for an hour and those that travel to different countries and the Carribbean....... See below.

The landing runway is 2170 feet long, and the approach, from either direction, is often plagued by varying degrees of turbulence. As a result, the French aviation authorities require that a special permit be issued to any pilot who intends to land in St. Barts.

Those planning to land in St Barts will have to land in Grand Case, French St Martin, first, in order to get their qualification. St Barts Control tower (Telephone: 590 590 27 65 33 - Fax: 590 590 27 98 96 ) will tell you how to contact a French instructor for certification. It takes a couple of hours, and includes touch-and-go in both directions. Don't do it on a windy day with a hangover.

http://www.st-barths.com/en/private-aircraft.html

The real thrill, as a passenger or onlooker, is an eight- to 15-minute flight away, on the tiny island of St. Barts (or St. Barths or, more formally, St. Barthelemy). With one of the shortest runways in commercial aviation, it's about the most exciting landing you can make without crashing (or, I guess, splashing down in the Hudson).
To land there, pilots, unaided by electronic landing guidance, must make a steep, slow glide, thread their way between a pair of wind-buffeted peaks, skim 150 feet down a hill while holding a 10-foot altitude, then level, touch down and brake hard.
"What makes St. Barts so challenging is the combination of things," said Eric Zipkin, a pilot and president of the charter service Tradewind Aviation, who personally trains his pilots for St. Barts landings. "You have to fly over a relatively large hill to land on a relatively small runway. The wind gets pretty strong, and it creates turbulence. It gets pretty exciting."
A little too exciting at times: Hard landings are a regular occurrence. "A couple of times a year an airplane gets bent in some form. Ninety percent of the time nobody gets hurt," Zipkin said casually. "I've seen a couple of airplanes crunch there. Usually it's crunched aluminum, a few bruises and badly injured egos."
Pilots go through two days of ground training and five to 10 hours of flight training to qualify for St. Barts landings. The only commercial planes allowed to land on the island are those specially made for short fields, such as the de Havilland Twin Otter, the Cessna Caravan and the Britten-Norman Islander, all planes that could generously be called vintage designs.
If you are lucky (or unlucky, depending on your tolerance for thrills), you might end up in the co-pilot seat, as I did, to watch the pilot work the yoke violently as you pass through the notch between the peaks, trying to keep level in the gusting winds.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/...AR2009020601861.html
 
Posts: 14795 | Registered: June 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Spent a few years flying otters out of STOL port, 1800’ stuffed between a Randeles grocery store and a two story apartment building in 100 degree + temperatures, it’s called experience, it’s not a super feat. Hong Kong was the scary one, aim for the cross on The Hill then break away to line up and land on the runway. But your doing it in a 747-400 so it was a little more exciting.


"Hold my beer.....Watch this".
 
Posts: 5410 | Location: Republic of Texas | Registered: April 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Go ahead punk, make my day
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quote:
Originally posted by sns3guppy:
quote:
Originally posted by RHINOWSO:
Guppy meet Jimmy, Jimmy meet Guppy.

Honestly, I think you two will get along MARVELOUSLY.


You really are a dick. It's getting old.
For someone as experienced in the Aviation community, you have surprisingly thin skin.

Just an observation.
 
Posts: 36149 | Registered: July 12, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Safety statistics show that the most dangerous flight time for pilots is between 500-1000 hrs. Cool
 
Posts: 2413 | Location: Florida | Registered: September 21, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Almost as Fast as a Speeding Bullet
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quote:
Originally posted by V-Tail:
quote:
there are TONS of very good pilots that wouldn't dare land and take off in St. Barts.
How many pilots does it take, to make a ton of them?
About 8 Captains or 16 FOs on average. Big Grin


______________________________________________
Aeronautics confers beauty and grandeur, combining art and science for those who devote themselves to it. . . . The aeronaut, free in space, sailing in the infinite, loses himself in the immense undulations of nature. He climbs, he rises, he soars, he reigns, he hurtles the proud vault of the azure sky. — Georges Besançon
 
Posts: 10892 | Location: Denver and/or The World | Registered: August 30, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Rhino, cool it. Let the show proceed.
 
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