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Here's something that you don't see everyday (nautical) Login/Join 
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quote:
Originally posted by jimb888:
I'm sure that would be a fearsome sight to the enemy to see them attacking headlong at you like that.


At least they won't get run over by a cargo ship now! Big Grin
 
Posts: 15020 | Registered: June 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Seeker of Clarity
Picture of r0gue
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I'd be half concerned somebody will F up and they'll collide.



Staring out the windows is for love songs and house flies. -- Jay Electronica
 
Posts: 8321 | Location: PA | Registered: August 02, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Avoiding
slam fires
Picture of 45 Cal
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Its good that we have the ability .
Its a damn shame this new Navy has these fuckups.
 
Posts: 21210 | Location: Georgia | Registered: February 19, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Step by step walk the thousand mile road
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The U.S. Navy sailed both Bunker Hill and Franklin home under their own power. Both ships came about as close to sinking as a ship can come and stay afloat.

Now the Navy calls the maritime equivalent of the auto club.



Nice is overrated

And people wonder why I carry a SIG P320

Death to Terrorists
 
Posts: 26253 | Location: Loudoun County, Virginia | Registered: May 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Sig2340:
The U.S. Navy sailed both Bunker Hill and Franklin home under their own power. Both ships came about as close to sinking as a ship can come and stay afloat.

Now the Navy calls the maritime equivalent of the auto club.


it's the safe bet. Those ships are heavily compromised. Rough weather and the damage could spread, get much worse, or you could lose the ship completely. Just like the Argentinian San Juan sub that continued on with several battery banks compromised and is lost. Not to mention the electrical and other items effected by a couple of flooded compartments.
 
Posts: 15020 | Registered: June 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
High standards,
low expectations
Picture of Surefire
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Jimmy123x, you have a cool sounding career. I’m a little envious.




The reward for hard work, is more hard work arcwelder76, 2013
 
Posts: 5145 | Location: Edmonton AB, Canada | Registered: July 05, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
His Royal Hiney
Picture of Rey HRH
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That's as low a morale as you can get if you're a sailor stationed on one of those ships.



"It did not really matter what we expected from life, but rather what life expected from us. We needed to stop asking about the meaning of life, and instead to think of ourselves as those who were being questioned by life – daily and hourly. Our answer must consist not in talk and meditation, but in right action and in right conduct. Life ultimately means taking the responsibility to find the right answer to its problems and to fulfill the tasks which it constantly sets for each individual." Viktor Frankl, Man's Search for Meaning, 1946.
 
Posts: 13449 | Location: Bay Area, CA | Registered: March 24, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Official Space Nerd
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quote:
Originally posted by Sig2340:
The U.S. Navy sailed both Bunker Hill and Franklin home under their own power. Both ships came about as close to sinking as a ship can come and stay afloat.

Now the Navy calls the maritime equivalent of the auto club.



Apples and oranges. Those cariers were damaged 70+ years ago. Besides, there wasn't any ocean-going vessel that could have transported either carrier. And, the nature of the damage was different. The DDGs were struck under the water line, compromising their water tight integrity. In WWII, one carrier was hit by bombs and the other by a kamikaze. They almost sank due to fire; not by hull breach. So, their water tight integrity was not affected (nor was their machinery, since they both made it back under their own power).

It would have been foolish to risk either DDG when they could take the safe route as they are doing here.

It IS a depressing sight, though.



No arsenal is so formidable as the will and moral courage of free men and women.
Ronald Reagan
 
Posts: 19748 | Location: Hobbiton, The Shire, Middle Earth | Registered: September 27, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by Hound Dog:
quote:
Originally posted by Sig2340:
The U.S. Navy sailed both Bunker Hill and Franklin home under their own power. Both ships came about as close to sinking as a ship can come and stay afloat.

Now the Navy calls the maritime equivalent of the auto club.



Apples and oranges. Those cariers were damaged 70+ years ago. Besides, there wasn't any ocean-going vessel that could have transported either carrier. And, the nature of the damage was different. The DDGs were struck under the water line, compromising their water tight integrity. In WWII, one carrier was hit by bombs and the other by a kamikaze. They almost sank due to fire; not by hull breach. So, their water tight integrity was not affected (nor was their machinery, since they both made it back under their own power).

It would have been foolish to risk either DDG when they could take the safe route as they are doing here.

It IS a depressing sight, though.


There isn't one today either, that is capable of carrying a full size aircraft carrier either (as far as I know).
 
Posts: 15020 | Registered: June 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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