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To retire, or not to retire. That is the question. Login/Join 
Charmingly unsophisticated
Picture of AllenInWV
posted
This may sound petulant and/or whiny, and it probably is. But I also think it's a legit gripe. I thought I'd see what you all think.

No secret, I work full-time for the WV ARNG. I was asked back in 2010 if I would be interested in an admin position that ran for one year. No guarantees of additional tours, as that was dependent on federal funding. I asked about travel, as at the time I had partial custody of my 14 y.o. son. I was told that other than AT, drill and military schools, no travel was required. As those three items are scheduled and announced well in advance, I had no problem with that. I reclassified into an admin MOS and I have been fortunate enough to keep being kept on orders each year since then.

Four years after I came on, I was chosen to work on the brigade staff. My funding source was changed to that of one of our battalions, but the same deal.....admin work, no travel. But then slowly, I started getting tagged to provide admin support on "away missions" for the battalion whose funding I was on. Not really what I wanted, but okay, whatever. Then the OPTEMPO picked up, I was being pulled away from my "normal" job at the brigade. The nature of my support changed as well. They started having me be an evaluator. I have struggled to find an analogy but I think the best comparison is this......

I am a skilled small-engine mechanic. But I'm being told to go and evaluate F1 racecar engineers. LOL

Last summer, the BN commander asked me why I gave so much push back about traveling. I explained to him my reservations. He told me matter-of-factly that as I was funded through his BN (it actually comes from federal sources, but I digress...), I worked for him and my brigade job was just an additional duty. I nodded, said "Yes sir" and went on with my brigade job.

Fast forward to today. I am tasked to go on a BN mission as an evaluator next Monday thru Friday. Okay, I was given ample notice, had time to arrange my schedule, have someone watch the animals, etc. No problem. But as I'm leaving the office the BN officer responsible for developing rosters for missions tells me "Hey, just so you know I may have to task you with the Utah mission."

They leave this Thursday. And then I would fly from Utah to the next mission.

Okay, I get it, it's the military. Sometimes I may be tasked to do stuff I don't want to do, or at a time that isn't convenient. But it's not the 82nd Airborne. It's not even active duty. We're basically a NG training and evaluation unit. A schoolhouse. Frankly I think this is absolutely ridiculous.

I recently hit 20 years service. While I had hoped to hit 20 years ACTIVE, the last couple of years has made me wonder if I can keep gritting my teeth and bear it. Right now I am seriously thinking about having my retirement in hand tomorrow when I get to work. If they come in and say "Yeah, you are going to Utah" I will walk it right down to the brigade commander's office. Downside is I have to work 4 years longer than planned and my retirement wouldn't be as much. But as all of my bills are paid except for my house (which I could pay off if I had to) I could also certainly afford a job that pays less and yet has less BS. Which would probably be good for me blood-pressure-wise. LOL Life is too short to wake up every morning dreading work.

Decisions, decisions.


_______________________________

"He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain that which he cannot lose."
- Jim Elliot
 
Posts: 14874 | Location: Cross Lanes, WV | Registered: February 05, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Three Generations
of Service
Picture of PHPaul
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quote:
But as all of my bills are paid except for my house (which I could pay off if I had to) I could also certainly afford a job that pays less and yet has less BS. Which would probably be good for me blood-pressure-wise. LOL Life is too short to wake up every morning dreading work.


That right there says it all. I quit my job 90 days before my first Social Security check was due because I'd had enough. My BP was out of control, I had a more-or-less continuous stress headache and I was a miserable prick to be around when I was home.

I told my boss I'd cover my weekend shift as scheduled and then I was done. 24 hours after my last shift I was back to my normal, cheerful angelic self.




Be careful when following the masses. Sometimes the M is silent.
 
Posts: 10533 | Location: Downeast Maine | Registered: March 10, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
For real?
Picture of Chowser
posted Hide Post
Do it since you can. You're not getting any younger. Spend time with your family.

I have a little over five years left. I will retire at 48.5 years old with 25 years on the job.

I have made plans and arrangements to be able to retire that young and not work anymore if I don't want to. I will but I am done with police work...in 5 years, 3 days, 4 hours, 20 mins.



Not minority enough!
 
Posts: 5498 | Location: South of Cleveland, OH | Registered: August 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Doubtful...
Picture of toms
posted Hide Post
Pull the plug.

I was "retired" last fall when my position was eliminated. They could pay 4 30 yo yes men for my salary. So, at 63 1/2, I called it quits. I bought a log cabin in the Smokey Mountains smack dab in the middle of the Cherokee National Forest with my own Trout stream 40' off my back porch. I just got here a week ago and have been putting in 12 hour days working on it and couldn't be happier.

Blood pressure has dropped so much that I'm off meds!


Best regards,

Tom


I have no comment at this time.
 
Posts: 2857 | Location: Coker Creek,TN | Registered: April 02, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Page late and a dollar short
posted Hide Post
quote:
Life is too short to wake up every morning dreading work.


Allen, you summed it up. Two years ago that was my decision. When you hate to go to work.......it's time.

The act of handing in your papers tomorrow may or may not work to your advantage, think carefully. If they"make it better" are you prepared to stay? Sometimes the bluff game works. Can you get it in writing of any offers to improve things?

Sounds like you have a financial plan in place. Having a paid off house is a plus. What sayeth your financial advisor on paying it off early? Will you lose any tax advantage in doing that?

Good luck whatever your decision is.


"Leaders become great, not because of their power, but because of their ability to empower others." -John Maxwell
 
Posts: 5045 | Location: Livingston County Michigan USA | Registered: August 11, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of lkdr1989
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Sounds like you've already made up your mind...if not, my advice - retire.




...let him who has no sword sell his robe and buy one. Luke 22:35-36 NAV

"Behold, I send you out as sheep in the midst of wolves; so be shrewd as serpents and innocent as doves." Matthew 10:16 NASV
 
Posts: 3000 | Location: Valley, Oregon | Registered: June 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of Leemur
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I’m currently trying to decide the pro/con balance of my job. From the outside looking in on your situation I say pop smoke and tell them to FOAD. Easier said than done in so many cases though.
 
Posts: 10889 | Location: Shenandoah Valley, VA | Registered: October 16, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I had never even thought about retiring when I got my 31st year in where I worked.
Unfortunately I was in an accident while in a JLG lift at work. The guy driving, drove into a small indoor drainage ditch. The covers had been removed and they refused to put them back on when I requested it. I was not driving the lift, but somehow it was my fault.

Though I was off for 4 months, they forced me back before I was healed and I worked with terrible back pain every day. They company who acted like it was somehow my fault were completely without sympathy. May be due to my being on workmans' comp.

IN the end, I just up and retired. The idea was scary, but I did.

Not sure how old you are that might make a difference. I was 52 when I retired. If you are much older, it is very hard to get another job.

I got a job as soon as I wanted one. It took me a couple years to heal my back, but then back to work.

Do not make yourself old with the dread. Those emotions are very hard on your health.

Had I worked longer I would not only have gotten a "buy out" of 48K$ but more money per month for retirement.
If you feel you can get another job, go for it.

I only spent 6 years in the ANG


NRA Life Endowment member
Tri-State Gun collectors Life Member
BFA Member
 
Posts: 1825 | Location: Ohio | Registered: December 18, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Do it if you can. When it becomes miserable to go in why do it. I've seen to many people wait far to long, if you can swing it find something you would enjoy more.


It's kids like you, who make this bus late.
 
Posts: 844 | Location: Weirton,WV | Registered: April 16, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
His Royal Hiney
Picture of Rey HRH
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I'm going to swim against the current here just on the principle that people shouldn't make a decision on a spur of the moment.

Right now, you have the ability to retire or not retire. If you pull the plug, you won't have the ability to un-retire. So take a deep breathe, sit down, write down your options along with the pros and cons under both. Then make your decision when you're clear about everything.

Having said that, if you can swing not having to work versus working.... Just imagine yourself at the end of your life, consider the odds of you saying, "Oh, I wish I had clocked in one more extra day at work."

Good luck with your decision.



"It did not really matter what we expected from life, but rather what life expected from us. We needed to stop asking about the meaning of life, and instead to think of ourselves as those who were being questioned by life – daily and hourly. Our answer must consist not in talk and meditation, but in right action and in right conduct. Life ultimately means taking the responsibility to find the right answer to its problems and to fulfill the tasks which it constantly sets for each individual." Viktor Frankl, Man's Search for Meaning, 1946.
 
Posts: 14398 | Location: Bay Area, CA | Registered: March 24, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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There is a great story passed around the officers of my BN, and I'll give an overly brief summary.

A career NCO hit his 20 years, got his 20 year letter...but stayed in. One AT, they're told they're going to stay out in the field.

It's pouring rain.

The NCO goes to the officer in charge of his company (he was the senior NCO at this point) and asks if this is really how he wants to do this. The officer says absolutely.

The NCO nods, pulls a copy of his letter out of his back pocket, hands it to the officer, and walks out the door, never to be seen again.

So goes the story, anyway.

It sounds to me too like you've pretty much made up your mind. If you weren't eligible yet I'd urge you to stay, but since you are...


----------
The first 100 people to make it out alive...get to live.
 
Posts: 1226 | Location: Pennsylvania | Registered: April 16, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I'm going to go with Rey HRH on this one. Think about it for a good 2 weeks, weigh the pro's and con's......then decide....or flip a coin at that point if you can't decide.
 
Posts: 15762 | Registered: June 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Go ahead punk, make my day
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If I was you.



I wasn't on active paid orders like you, but once I crossed the finish line in the reserves, I was glad to cut away all the mandatory bullshit.
 
Posts: 37853 | Registered: July 12, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Charmingly unsophisticated
Picture of AllenInWV
posted Hide Post
I'm still LOLing at RHINO's pic.



Thanks guys...

Having an evening to cool off a bit, my better option is probably go in and tell them I cannot do the mission on such short notice. If it costs me being on ADOS, so be it. I do have my 20 years, and even as M-Day I'll be earning more towards my pension. And if M-Day starts to wear thin.....


_______________________________

"He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain that which he cannot lose."
- Jim Elliot
 
Posts: 14874 | Location: Cross Lanes, WV | Registered: February 05, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I know guys that have deployed several times to Iraq and Afghanistan so you should be thankful you're not being sent OCONUS. In my opinion I think you're whining to much just because you're being tasked to go on what sounds like OIP inspections. If that's too much for you to handle then yes you should retire. I spent a total of 31 years as a Army Reservist, 13 years of AD mixed in and retired in May 2016. Unfortunately the military isn't always a 9 to 5 job so when you're told to go you have to go.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: calugo,
 
Posts: 891 | Location: USA | Registered: December 11, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of Redleg06
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Your age and medical insurance may play into your decision. As a reserve retiree, I couldn't start receiving my retired pay until I reached age 60. That was 11 years ago and the rules may be different now. If you are not yet 60 (if that still applies) what will you do for health care in the interim?

I was the S3 at a USAR school when I got promoted out of my slot at age 47. I transferred to the Retired Reserve, which preserved my status and subsequent pay raises for when I officially retired at age 60. Health insurance was covered by my other job.


"Cedat Fortuna Peritis"
 
Posts: 1672 | Location: Central Texas | Registered: June 12, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by AllenInWV:

...I recently hit 20 years service. While I had hoped to hit 20 years ACTIVE, the last couple of years has made me wonder if I can keep gritting my teeth and bear it...


Sounds like you'll get a RESERVE retirement now, all that will get you is PX privileges until you turn 60. No $$, no TriCare. You didn't say if you're AGR or a civil service WG technician, those both provide health care and other benefits.

Do some math and think about it. Don't make an impulsive decision you'll later regret.
 
Posts: 12931 | Location: Eastern Iowa | Registered: May 21, 2000Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
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quote:
Originally posted by Redleg06:
Your age and medical insurance may play into your decision. As a reserve retiree, I couldn't start receiving my retired pay until I reached age 60. That was 11 years ago and the rules may be different now. If you are not yet 60 (if that still applies) what will you do for health care in the interim?

I was the S3 at a USAR school when I got promoted out of my slot at age 47. I transferred to the Retired Reserve, which preserved my status and subsequent pay raises for when I officially retired at age 60. Health insurance was covered by my other job.


Reservists still draw retirement benefits at age 60 unless they are eligible for Early Age Drop. EAD subtracts from 60 for every 90 days a reservist is on active duty starting from January 2008. Gray area retirees are eligible for Tricare at a cost of 400 per month for single members and around a thousand a month if you have dependents. Once you hit 60 you're then eligible for Tricare for life but I'm not familiar with the rates.
 
Posts: 891 | Location: USA | Registered: December 11, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of old rugged cross
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I would not make that kind of decision in a reaction moment. I know you are thinking about it. But do it on your terms and not in the moment. If you want to do it now, fine. But doing it because you are pissed off in the moment or week is generally not prudent. Take your time and figure it out. Then either do it or keep with the original plan. You can retire at any time. So doing it in haste is not best. Imho




"Practice like you want to play in the game"
 
Posts: 12313 | Registered: September 21, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by calugo:

...Gray area retirees are eligible for Tricare at a cost of 400 per month for single members and around a thousand a month if you have dependents. Once you hit 60 you're then eligible for Tricare for life but I'm not familiar with the rates.


I do not know anything about gray area and TriCare, but when I turned 60 I had a choice of basic TriCare (free) or TriCare Prime (about $125/month). At 65 TriCare became TriCare For Life (TFL, free), but I HAD to get MediCare Part B, around $130/mo. I'm five miles from an active duty clinic, I get all my meds there.
 
Posts: 12931 | Location: Eastern Iowa | Registered: May 21, 2000Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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