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I blame PH Paul & the other Kubota owners! Login/Join 
Buy that Classic SIG in All Stainless,
No rail wear will be painless.
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quote:
Originally posted by szuppo:
Where did you get the tires from?


If your question was for me, Amazon.
Also, try your local Kubota dealership.
The sales department, it's called a "whole goods" item. If you go to the parts department you will get hosed. The new bar tires came on new Kubota wheels as well.

Bad news today while processing firewood...
Got a bad sidewall tear on one of the new bar tires. No fixing this one!



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Posts: 1054 | Registered: December 14, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Buy that Classic SIG in All Stainless,
No rail wear will be painless.
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Another enjoyable weekend spent at the cabin.
We're trying to get everything done so when firearm deer season rolls around again, the place is walk-in ready.

We got a Larson storm/screen door but didn't get it installed. After reading the directions, I found I will have to replace the Trex trim around the outside of the existing entry door with some 5/4 trim first.

The electric baseboard heat worked great!
Nighttime temperatures at the cabin site was about 40 F. Too warm for wood stove usage and too chilly for no heat. The dogs appreciated the warmth.

In-Law equivalents now split the year between Florida and New York, six months in each state.
They dropped/cut/split several large ash trees at their New York location that were overhanging their garage.

With them gone from New York in the winter, their firewood usage requirements have been drastically reduced. They donated a huge load of split/seasoned ash for the cabin and even delivered it. So we now have a huge surplus.

I've been cutting some cherry and maple trees and cleaning up the ATV trails of naturally occurring fallen trees. Those I'm leaving in ~ four foot sections that just fit into the Kubota front bucket.
When the piles are large enough, those will get cut/split/stacked.

I have seven standard hardwood pallets now for stacking the firewood that is ready for use.

IMG_20200613_181534208_HDR by cee_Kamp 32ACP, on Flickr

IMG_20200613_181553430_HDR by cee_Kamp 32ACP, on Flickr

IMG_20200613_181623413_HDR by cee_Kamp 32ACP, on Flickr

IMG_20200613_181631344_HDR by cee_Kamp 32ACP, on Flickr



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Posts: 1054 | Registered: December 14, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Buy that Classic SIG in All Stainless,
No rail wear will be painless.
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We're still making summer progress at the cabin. We've had some brutally hot weather this year which has slowed the pace.

When the power company hooked us up to grid power they had to install a taller and larger diameter pole.
(the original pole only had wires on it, the new pole needed to support wires and a big transformer)
The old power pole was cut off with a chain saw and left on site. After it sat for months it became obvious that they were not going to take the old pole, I decided to re-purpose it for mounting a outside TV antenna.
I will also string an overhead run of aircraft cable so I can hang some lights over the path to the outhouse.

IMG_20191204_130608394_HDR by cee_Kamp 32ACP, on Flickr

IMG_20200801_185323518_HDR by cee_Kamp 32ACP, on Flickr

IMG_20200801_185348706_HDR by cee_Kamp 32ACP, on Flickr

The trim around the cabin door wasn't thick enough for attaching the new storm/screen door.
We removed the original trim surrounding the door, got some pressure treated 2" X 4" boards and ripped them for thickness on a table saw and put up the new door. It really helps with summer ventilation!
The Bulldog has learned how to open doors that aren't fully latched by head butting them.
The Larson brand door has some rather rugged material at the bottom which will hopefully stand up to "Hammerhead"

IMG_20200731_201208928 by cee_Kamp 32ACP, on Flickr

We haul water to the cabin for washing and drinking. No real plans for a well due to cost and the difficulty of keeping it from freezing when nobody is there. The cabin is heated only when occupied.
We located a spring below a side hill within several hundred feet of the cabin.
The spring appeared dry this summer due to dry conditions.
I made a path for the Kubota going from the field down to the spring using fill from a digging project.

IMG_20200801_185450412_HDR by cee_Kamp 32ACP, on Flickr

I got the Kubota at the spring site and started digging with the backhoe. Very rough digging!
It appeared the water was seeping to the surface between the layers of shale.

IMG_20200801_185555924 by cee_Kamp 32ACP, on Flickr

IMG_20200801_185538126_HDR by cee_Kamp 32ACP, on Flickr

The water is nasty looking now from being disturbed while digging. If/when it clears up, I will put the five foot long section of HDPE 24" diameter pipe into the hole I dug and install a pump and run a garden hose and extension cord up to the cabin. That water may never be suitable for drinking, but will work fine for washing up.

IMG_20200801_185503245_HDR by cee_Kamp 32ACP, on Flickr

Fifteen or so years ago, I bought a used camper (1970's vintage) for the propane appliances in it.
For several years I covered it with blue tarps so the leaky roof wouldn't damage the interior.
As the time went by it was abandoned. The interior collapsed, the roof leaked, and it became filled with mice and bees/yellow jackets. It needed to go as it was becoming an eyesore. I called the local auto crusher and all the wood had to be removed before they would take it. The local trailer/camper dealer suggested putting it on Facebook Marketplace. Over the span of a weekend we got more than ONE THOUSAND messages about the camper.
Our ad stated that it needed to be scrapped and it wasn't suitable for being used for camping.
It didn't seem to matter, everybody wanted it.
The first guy that showed up with a pickup truck brought a floor jack and cribbing.
He jacked up the camper and removed the wheels. The tires were wasted from sitting, all dry rotted.
He returned the next day and reinstalled the wheels that had some new to him second hand tires.
We waved as he disappeared out the gate with the rotten old camper!
Then we quickly closed and locked the gate.

IMG_20200613_183647532_HDR by cee_Kamp 32ACP, on Flickr

IMG_20200801_185332056_HDR by cee_Kamp 32ACP, on Flickr



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Posts: 1054 | Registered: December 14, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Just having a good time
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Thanks. I enjoyed your pics. You have done a great job.



" I didn't fail the test,I just found 100 ways to do it wrong." - Benjamin Franklin
 
Posts: 1386 | Location: N. C. | Registered: November 22, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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...”then we quickly closed and locked the gate.”

That was hilarious. Thanks for the updates.


------------------
Eddie

Our Founding Fathers were men who understood that the right thing is not necessarily the written thing. -kkina
 
Posts: 5025 | Location: SML & OBX | Registered: February 19, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Buy that Classic SIG in All Stainless,
No rail wear will be painless.
Picture of cee_Kamp
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I've been having some issues with the new gates.
It seems the steel tubing is open on both ends of the main loop. (at the bottom)
Wrapping the chain around the gates to lock them, and clanking the chain/lock for unlocking the gates isn't quiet.
Swarms of yellow jackets come BOILING out of that open ended steel tubing.
CRC Red Can Brake Cleaner kills them dead. Spray foamed the big open steel tubing ends.
Bought some FERNCO rubber caps with stainless steel worm hose clamps. Put them on the open tubes.
Problem solved? NOPE! Each of the five horizontal steel tubes on each gate have little openings.
The bastards are in there also. Twenty more holes that need spray foam.



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Posts: 1054 | Registered: December 14, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Buy that Classic SIG in All Stainless,
No rail wear will be painless.
Picture of cee_Kamp
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So... After a long summer with cabin projects we are about six weeks out from the start of firearms deer season.
For something new this year I acquired an inexpensive crossbow. Here in state of NY, crossbows are a complex issue.
They can only be used in the final two weeks of bow season, and requires a muzzle loader tag. I know, ffed up NY.
Crossbows can also be used during the firearms season, and during the late muzzle loader season, but why would you...

We have our cabin firewood for winter all cut, split and stacked.

IMG_20200919_132347031_HDR_LI by cee_Kamp 32ACP, on Flickr

The first floor of the cabin is 308 square feet. There isn't much counter space.
We've been using a small plastic table with foldable legs. It worked but wasn't optimal.
More than a decade ago I noticed a For Sale advertisement in the local newspaper for sections of bowling alley that had been removed from a bowling facility that was being closed down. I bought four sections at $75 per and put them in storage. Over the years, I gave two sections away. Each section was about 42" wide and 72" long.

We decided to make a table for the Kitchen area at the cabin that was on casters.
During food preparation, use it for counter space. When you sit down for a meal, there is room for guests.
When done using the table, roll it out of the way.
We started the table project here at home in June.

Section of Bowling Alley.

IMG_20200630_173520789 by cee_Kamp 32ACP, on Flickr

IMG_20200630_173530201 by cee_Kamp 32ACP, on Flickr

I sourced a set of steel adjustable workbench legs from Amazon.
Welded plates on the bottom for the casters.
I had to shorten the legs to get the overall table height at 29" to 30" (standard dinner table height) after accounting for the casters and thickness of the bowling alley. The "T" irons (next to each leg where it attaches to the wood) provides structural support.

IMG_20200716_151617314_HDR by cee_Kamp 32ACP, on Flickr

After getting the legs attached, the fun began. Literally days of sanding with a belt sander for the rough sanding, and then days with several vibratory sanders for the finish sanding. A relative offered some 100 year old cherry boards for edging around the perimeter. The cherry boards were ripped on a table saw, then glued to the edges of the table in picture frame format. We also decided to fabricate some ornamental ironwork on the corners, and to add some square headed lag screws for the cherry boards as a backup to the glued attachment. Six coats of polyurethane, sanded between coats. The final coat of poly was wet sanded with crocus cloth, then buffed with a random orbital automotive polisher using compound commonly used for clear coat automotive use.

IMG_20200929_120128976 by cee_Kamp 32ACP, on Flickr

IMG_20200929_120111492 by cee_Kamp 32ACP, on Flickr

IMG_20200929_120201393 by cee_Kamp 32ACP, on Flickr

IMG_20200929_120100332 by cee_Kamp 32ACP, on Flickr

IMG_20200929_121520115 by cee_Kamp 32ACP, on Flickr

We hauled the table up to the cabin over the weekend. The lower parts of the legs had to be removed to get the table thru the front door. Once inside, reassembled, and ready for use!

IMG_20201003_142239323 by cee_Kamp 32ACP, on Flickr

IMG_20201003_142253621 by cee_Kamp 32ACP, on Flickr

Bowling alley (at least this one) is hardwood only at the ends in the pin setting area, and where you throw the ball.
The rest is old growth Michigan Pine. There is one maple strip on each side where the diagonal screws attached the alley to the floor. Another interesting tidbit is that the pine boards are NOT glued together, they are nailed together with finishing nails. So squaring the ends for the finished product involved cutting nails with a carbide circular saw blade, and drilling the holes for the square head lag bolts ran into nails as well.

Overall, we are extremely pleased with the outcome of the Table Project!



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Posts: 1054 | Registered: December 14, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Serenity now!
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I've been enjoying this thread! Please keep it up!



Ladies and gentlemen, take my advice - pull down your pants and slide on the ice.
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Posts: 4641 | Location: Highland, UT | Registered: September 14, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Beautiful table with lots of character!


------------------
Eddie

Our Founding Fathers were men who understood that the right thing is not necessarily the written thing. -kkina
 
Posts: 5025 | Location: SML & OBX | Registered: February 19, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Love your pics Cee.
I would bet you are glad the biggest part of your project is done?

I did finally get my tractor.
I got the Kubota MX5400 with the can o pee and FEL.


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Posts: 2786 | Location: Ohio | Registered: December 18, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Buy that Classic SIG in All Stainless,
No rail wear will be painless.
Picture of cee_Kamp
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Aquabird,
I'm glad you got your tractor! I'd be lost without the BX.
As far as the biggest part being done, yes & no.
While the cabin seems done, there are always projects going on.
With ~ 70 acres, there is always something somewhere that needs attention.
We were up at the cabin last weekend. I installed one new wall mounted light in the cabin.
Then outside on the Kubota for most of the day.
The power line right of way was cleared about four years ago. (routine maintenance, not a new cut)
The contractor the power company hired left a huge mess.
Every scrub tree they cut down lay where it fell.
And every scrub tree had a stump sticking up.
We use the power line right of way as a foot path/ATV trail for getting out to some of the deer stands and blinds.
Naturally, walking and ATV riding on top of fallen scrub tree trunks and stumps isn't ideal.
Especially when it's covered in snow.
Last year we got nearly 24 inches of snow the day before firearms deer season started.
I spent most of the day with the Kubota clearing small stumps and fallen trees & rocks in the power line right of way.
Now it's an easy walk without trip hazards or punctured ATV tires.
You never have to look very far to find work that needs attention when at the cabin.
Last year we were struggling during firearms deer season. We were running the cabin on a generator so we were hauling potable water and enough gasoline for the big 13 hp Honda generator for multiple days of operation.
Then during black powder deer season (mid December) I finished the trenching for hooking up to the grid power.
But all that is now a distant unpleasant memory!

4x5 & smisig,
Thanks for the comments!



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Posts: 1054 | Registered: December 14, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Buy that Classic SIG in All Stainless,
No rail wear will be painless.
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After 16 months of preparation and sweat equity, the cabin & property is ready for deer season. Last year we ran the cabin on the big Honda generator. This year we have grid power!
Firearms deer season starts here in my location on Saturday, November 21st. We prepped all the ground blinds, ladder stands, and tripod stands back in October.
We get the hunting "gang" together for a "stands & blinds" day. We generally go through 10 or so packages of camo burlap and a couple large bags of zip ties when we prep the stands and blinds.

Several new additions this year, a STIHL MSA 140C electric (battery) chainsaw. Very impressive for clearing out light brush/limbs from the ATV trails and walking paths.
It's small enough to hand carry vs the much larger & heavier gas powered MS 250 STIHL. The 140C is the smallest saw that uses the larger "AK" series 36 volt battery. 45 minutes run time.
Also, Santa brought me a LEM "Big Bite" 3/4 HP meat grinder.

Everyone who hunts on the property donates a couple packages of burlap and a day of labor. The ATV trails and walking paths get trimmed with a string trimmer so all the grass/weeds/brush is gone.
We set up shooting lanes, wrap the stands & blinds with the new burlap, and get the place ready.

Heading to the cabin on Friday!



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Posts: 1054 | Registered: December 14, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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That table is awesome!
 
Posts: 1174 | Registered: October 19, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Buy that Classic SIG in All Stainless,
No rail wear will be painless.
Picture of cee_Kamp
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Back in 2004, I bought a 2002 Honda 350 Rancher two wheel drive ATV for $3000. (utility style, not a Go fast model)
I soon learned when using it at the rural property for a "work" vehicle, that it needed better tires than it originally was equipped with.
I found some Goodyear Mud Runner Run Flat lugged mud tires and installed a set of four.
That ATV would go places you couldn't walk. With the Goodyear tires the 2WD machine outperformed a 4X4 ATV with stock tires.
We used the ATV for many things, including deer carcass retrieval during hunting season.
Here where I live, they salt the roads heavily during the winter.
So just about every time we went deer hunting, the ATV was hauled behind a vehicle and showered with road salt.

The 19 year old Honda ATV still ran perfectly, it just looked rough with rust on the steel/iron components, and aluminum corrosion elsewhere.
I had been thinking about replacing the 2002 ATV with a side by side, but with the ATV width trail system at the property, most side by sides are too wide.

I noticed Honda introduced a new side by side this year for 2021. Pioneer 520 with a dump box. It's only 50 inches wide and will be great on the existing trail system.
(most side by sides are 60 inches+ wide)
Gear to gear transmission, oil bath centrifugal clutch, paddle shifters. No damn snowmobile belt drive.
Fuel injected, water cooled, single cylinder DOHC 4 valves.
They pulled existing Honda components together for this machine, about all that's new is the dump box.
I generally will not buy a first year model, but will make an exception for this machine due to existing engineering and proven components for it's majority.
I ordered a new 2021 Honda Pioneer 520 with Olive Green body panels.

We put the 2002 Honda ATV on Facebook Marketplace and completed a cash sale for $2300 in less than 24 hours last weekend.
Today we rolled the ATV sale proceeds into a deposit on a new 6' by 10' aluminum trailer for the side by side.
That 2002 Honda ATV held it's value remarkably well. It didn't owe me a dime.

I also called the Honda Dealership and checked on the side by side delivery date.
Still no good news, COVID has slowed them down.
BTW, Honda side by sides and ATV's are Engineered in Ohio, and Manufactured in South Carolina.
The snow is too deep here for riding a wheeled vehicle off-road.
I'm impatiently waiting!

We have another ATV (2006 Honda 250 with very low hours, utility style) that's going to get a tire upgrade and it will become the winter mule for deer carcass retrieval during salt season.
The Pioneer 520 side by side and the aluminum trailer are too damn expensive for salt season usage.

2021 Honda Pioneer 520 Olive by cee_Kamp 32ACP, on Flickr

2021 Honda Pioneer 520 Olive by cee_Kamp 32ACP, on Flickr

2021 Honda Pioneer 520 Olive by cee_Kamp 32ACP, on Flickr

This message has been edited. Last edited by: cee_Kamp,



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Posts: 1054 | Registered: December 14, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Buy that Classic SIG in All Stainless,
No rail wear will be painless.
Picture of cee_Kamp
posted Hide Post
Several cabin and property updates.
We installed another 4 foot section of LED track lighting on the first floor.

While at the cabin during the 2020 deer season we noticed some ATV tracks in the snow that didn't belong to us.
Our initial thought was trespassers. Further inspection showed a new "cable" was strung on the power poles.
A few phone calls later when we got back home, we were informed that a small regional internet company has installed fiber optic internet.
The system is due to go "live" in spring 2021.
That will solve the communication problems at the cabin.
$55 a month for 100 Mbps up/down.

Cell phones (via internet), streaming TV, weather, and trail/security cameras are all possible when the system goes live.

We were up at the cabin several weekends ago for a getaway weekend and got stuck in the field due to accumulated snow. (we don't plow snow at the cabin)
I had to shovel out the 4WD Jeep and use wood stove ashes/cinders under the tires to get unstuck.
I guess we are done until spring.



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Posts: 1054 | Registered: December 14, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Dances With
Tornados
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At a pic posted above about the table build you mentioned you used Crocus Cloth.

Where in the world did you find it? I thought it was extinct. I have 2 sheets that must be 40 years old. I don't think anybody made it anymore.
.
 
Posts: 9615 | Registered: October 26, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Buy that Classic SIG in All Stainless,
No rail wear will be painless.
Picture of cee_Kamp
posted Hide Post
I don't know where I got the crocus cloth, I've had it for decades.
But Amazon has it in stock.

https://www.amazon.com/Sanding...d=1612833028&sr=8-15



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Posts: 1054 | Registered: December 14, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Dances With
Tornados
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The old Crocus Cloth from years ago, probably 35-40 years ago, was made differently and better than what is made recently, I think.
From the interwebs:

Crocus cloth is an abrasive sheet similar to sand paper or emery cloth but covered with a layer of very fine loose iron oxide particles rather than with bound grains of abrasive. It is intended for final metal and gemstone finishing and is available in various grades (particle sizes). Federal Specification P-C-458 described this material in detail, although the specification was cancelled in 1989.[1]

I tried some of the new stuff and it was about like sandpaper.

FWIW.
 
Posts: 9615 | Registered: October 26, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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