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0W-16 oil, really? Login/Join 
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Picture of ridewv
posted
About to change oil and the 2019 Corolla calls for, not the somewhat common 0W-20 oil which Honda specs for my Ridgeline, but 0W-16. Car salesman made a big to do over this "special" oil pointing out the sticker in the engine compartment and instructed me "do NOT use 0W-20!"
Well I'm not, it's getting 5W-30 Mobil 1 which I standardized on for my cars and trucks to eliminate having part bottles of various viscosity and brands of oil.
Motorcycles are a little more of a problem I keep three different oils for them but one of them is Shell Rotella 5W-40 synthetic which is also used in all the outside stuff; mowers, log splitter, mule, and Kubota.
I think keeping 4 different oils (therefore that many part bottles as well) on hand is enough.

For you guys who change their own do you use exactly what every manufacturer suggests on everything you have?


No car is as much fun to drive, as any motorcycle is to ride.
 
Posts: 5050 | Location: Northern WV | Registered: January 17, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of PowerSurge
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Ow-20 in the Tundra. I wouldn’t use 0w-16 though. If you run too thick of an oil it can cause VVT and/or VCT component rattle in a lot of modern engines when cold.

These engines aren’t like your daddy’s 350 Chevy or 302 Ford.


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Posts: 2553 | Location: Northeast Georgia | Registered: November 18, 2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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This oil is not supposed to be available until May. Until then change your oil, even if it is synthetic, every 3K or so. Gasoline direct injection engines are suffering from oil dilution issues and can fail prematurely. The new oil will come in two “flavors” one especially for GDI engines.




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Posts: 9868 | Location: Jawjah | Registered: December 30, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I do. I buy the best oils and grease for my vehicles and equipment. Not just because that is what it is designed to use but also for warranty purposes.
 
Posts: 3011 | Location: MD | Registered: March 23, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Not really from Vienna
Picture of arfmel
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I’ve made my mechanic drain 5W-20 they put in, and replace it with the GM specified 0W-20 on my 2018 Silverado. Not gonna let GM have any way to weasel out of the warranty on this thing.





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Posts: 25007 | Location: Young American Teen Club | Registered: January 30, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of PowerSurge
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quote:
Originally posted by detroit192:
This oil is not supposed to be available until May. Until then change your oil, even if it is synthetic, every 3K or so. Gasoline direct injection engines are suffering from oil dilution issues and can fail prematurely. The new oil will come in two “flavors” one especially for GDI engines.


Some retailers like Advance Auto Parts are already selling 0w-16


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Posts: 2553 | Location: Northeast Georgia | Registered: November 18, 2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of ridewv
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quote:
Originally posted by detroit192:
This oil is not supposed to be available until May. Until then change your oil, even if it is synthetic, every 3K or so. Gasoline direct injection engines are suffering from oil dilution issues and can fail prematurely. The new oil will come in two “flavors” one especially for GDI engines.


Toyota has been selling it and I'm pretty sure I saw it at auto Zone?

Are you saying change synthetic oil every 3,000 miles until switching to 0w-16 synthetic? Not sure I understand that reasoning? Anyway as mentioned it'll get 5w-30 synthetic every 5,000.

I don't think Toyots has the oil dilution problem, I'll see what it looks and smells like when I change it. Dipstick looks and smells normal though. Honda sure does with their 1.5 turbo though. I know when I first checked oil in my friends 2018 CRV the oil was black and smelled of gasoline and it actually gains volume slightly between changes. I think Honda says to wait until the minder tells you it's time to change but that might be as long as 10,000 miles, so I do hers about every 5,000 and the oil that drains out smells horrible. The oil coming out of the 3.5 V6 in my Ridgeline looks and smells fine at 5,000 miles and is down about 1/2 qt at that point when it gets changed.


No car is as much fun to drive, as any motorcycle is to ride.
 
Posts: 5050 | Location: Northern WV | Registered: January 17, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Green Mountain Boy
Picture of Jus228
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You can buy it from a Toyota parts department and yes please use it. Your engine is made to tight tolerances, which is how they can get away with such thin oil. 0-20w might be fine in summer temperatures but eh i dunno that I’ll bother with changing it up depending on the season.


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Posts: 5562 | Location: Vermont | Registered: March 02, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of 4MUL8R
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You all would not believe how many years of research has gone into 0W-16 motor oil. And millions and millions of yen. We formulate the additives that go into motor oils, and the testing is comprehensive and complete. The most risk-averse manufacturer is Toyota. If they specify 0W-16, buy with confidence.


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Posts: 3450 | Location: Commonwealth of Virginia | Registered: January 15, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of .38supersig
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^^^
What this guy says is how it is.

As for me, when I change my oil, the cap says use Mobil-1 10-W30. The owners manual says use Mobil-1 10-W30. The factory shop manual says use Mobil-1 10-W30. Kinda takes the guesswork out of it.

Changing oil is somewhat tricky once it involves more than two gallons. Wink



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Picture of egregore
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Well I'm not, it's getting 5W-30 Mobil 1

Check your owner's manual for recommended viscosities for different temperature ranges, not just the oil cap. If 5W30 is not on the list, I would not recommend using it. I'll bet you could get away with 0W20, which is readily available. But using heavier oil in an engine not rated for it might cause problems, mainly with VVT sprockets.
 
Posts: 23442 | Location: Johnson City/Elizabethton, TN | Registered: April 28, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
For real?
Picture of Chowser
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Mine says 0W-20 every 10k miles or 1 calendar year. I do it every 7.5k miles with is about six months for me.



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Posts: 6534 | Location: Cleveland, OH | Registered: August 09, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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0-16w, or 0-20w, summertime WV? I can’t imaging the 0-20 synthetic wouldn’t be enough?

Yeah, I’d try to get the correct label, if able.
 
Posts: 4051 | Location: WI | Registered: February 29, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by PowerSurge:
Ow-20 in the Tundra. I wouldn’t use 0w-16 though. If you run too thick of an oil it can cause VVT and/or VCT component rattle in a lot of modern engines when cold.

These engines aren’t like your daddy’s 350 Chevy or 302 Ford.


THIS- Don't put 5w-30, it's too heavy for the small passages in your motor and the valvetrain. 0-20W would probably be fine, but who knows. Why not just buy the oil your engine requires???? I love how people want to save pennies maintaining something that costs 10's of thousands.
 
Posts: 19211 | Registered: June 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of ridewv
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quote:
Originally posted by egregore:
quote:
Well I'm not, it's getting 5W-30 Mobil 1

Check your owner's manual for recommended viscosities for different temperature ranges, not just the oil cap. If 5W30 is not on the list, I would not recommend using it. I'll bet you could get away with 0W20, which is readily available. But using heavier oil in an engine not rated for it might cause problems, mainly with VVT sprockets.


Oil viscosity is always a compromise even in multi grade oils. The way owners manuals used to be written was to give suggested viscosity ranges which we could select from based on the anticipated ambient temperature expected between the oil change and the next change. In the US they seem to have gotten away from this, now only recommending a single grade and it being very thin. Why? I'm not sure but I suspect Toyota may not be able to run their car through the EPA fuel economy cycle with ultra thin oil, but then suggest thicker oil can be used as well.

I have no doubt that 0W-16 oil will perform adequately in even hot conditions, but I'm not yet convinced its use is in the best interest of the engine long term, well beyond warranty.


No car is as much fun to drive, as any motorcycle is to ride.
 
Posts: 5050 | Location: Northern WV | Registered: January 17, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by ridewv:
quote:
Originally posted by egregore:
[QUOTE]Well I'm not, it's getting 5W-30 Mobil 1

Check your owner's manual for recommended viscosities for different temperature ranges, not just the oil cap. If 5W30 is not on the list, I would not recommend using it. I'll bet you could get away with 0W20, which is readily available. But using heavier oil in an engine not rated for it might cause problems, mainly with VVT sprockets.


Oil viscosity is always a compromise even in multi grade oils. The way owners manuals used to be written was to give suggested viscosity ranges which we could select from based on the anticipated ambient temperature expected between the oil change and the next change. In the US they seem to have gotten away from this, now only recommending a single grade and it being very thin. Why? I'm not sure but I suspect Toyota may not be able to run their car through the EPA fuel economy cycle with ultra thin oil, but then suggest thicker oil can be used as well. The entire reason Toyota specifies it, is because they most likely torture tested dozens of motors and found out that the heavier oil creates extra wear. Check the owners manual and see what's approved for your climate.

Ferrari's use 0W oil......and they rev over 8,000 rpms and they could care less about fuel economy cause you're paying the gas guzzler tax when you buy one anyways.
 
Posts: 19211 | Registered: June 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by jimmy123x:

Ferrari's use 0W oil......and they rev over 8,000 rpms and they could care less about fuel economy cause you're paying the gas guzzler tax when you buy one anyways.


Are you talking here in the US?

Just googling Ferrari oil recommendation (in the UK) it's 5W-40.


No car is as much fun to drive, as any motorcycle is to ride.
 
Posts: 5050 | Location: Northern WV | Registered: January 17, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by ridewv:
quote:
Originally posted by jimmy123x:

Ferrari's use 0W oil......and they rev over 8,000 rpms and they could care less about fuel economy cause you're paying the gas guzzler tax when you buy one anyways.


Are you talking here in the US?

Just googling Ferrari oil recommendation (in the UK) it's 5W-40.


Their Formula 1 race teams use 0W oil in the F1 race cars. Some of the Ferrari challenge teams use it as well or 0w-16. A friend of mine is a Ferrari race team mechanic at all of the races. F1 can only use 3 different engines per entire season. So if 0W holds up for Formula 1 use, 0w-16 should hold up in the OP's Toyota, if Toyota says to use it.

"Inside an F1 engine, race lubricants are under huge pressure and must withstand peak temperatures in excess of 1,000oC. To adapt to this feature in the cars, Shell designed Shell Helix Ultra 0W low-viscosity oil to withstand the toughest environments when on the track, while delivering maximum performance and efficiency. The oil also ensures that the turbocharger is protected whilst minimising friction in other parts of the engine.
Thus, as well as helping the team’s engines run harder for longer, they also assist in monitoring the engine’s health. Led by Shell Motorsport Technology manager Guy Lovett, Stinton and his colleague Paul Johnson have been accompanying the F1 Scuderia Ferrari team this season doing exactly that."

https://eandt.theiet.org/conte...ne-grand-prix-races/
 
Posts: 19211 | Registered: June 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of ridewv
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Ok so HP specialty built, hybrid, race engines have to last on average 7 races. Given their performance that's impressive.
But what oil does Ferrari or Porsche recommend in their newer street cars? A few years ago at VIR the newer Porsches had cases of 40 or 50 weight oil (I can't recall which?) 0w-50 I think.


No car is as much fun to drive, as any motorcycle is to ride.
 
Posts: 5050 | Location: Northern WV | Registered: January 17, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by ridewv:
Ok so HP specialty built, hybrid, race engines have to last on average 7 races. Given their performance that's impressive.
But what oil does Ferrari or Porsche recommend in their newer street cars? A few years ago at VIR the newer Porsches had cases of 40 or 50 weight oil (I can't recall which?) 0w-50 I think.


The point I am trying to make. Is the Toyota engineers that designed, built and tested your engine, know a heck of a lot more than you or I do about the engine in your Toyota. I'm sure they torture tested dozens of them and tested various weight oils. So why second guess the manufacturers recommendations?

It does not matter what Porsche recommends for their cars, the only thing that matters is what Toyota recommends for your car.

If you have some miles on the factory 0w-16 oil in your vehicle, buy the $23 CAT S.O.S. oil sample kit (includes bottle, sample tubing, shipping label and sampling the oil) at any Caterpillar dealer, and the $25 hand pump, and get your car up to temperature, pull an oil sample and send it off and see what the lab says about it. It will tell you exactly what condition your oil is in and if there is any abnormal wear.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: jimmy123x,
 
Posts: 19211 | Registered: June 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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