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Knows too little
about too much
Picture of rduckwor
posted
Chase just sent me a text. Someone tried to buy Bose equipment on my card. It was only used in three places in the last 24 hours, so I am calling CS in each company to exact a pound of flesh from supervisors.

Of course, there is no guarantee that any of the three were the source, but it seems very likely.

BE AWARE, that PAYPAL was one of these companies. The other two were local affairs.

At least they tried to buy good stuff.

Bastards!!

RMD




Some men are morally opposed to violence; they are protected by men who are not.
 
Posts: 18403 | Location: L.A. - Lower Alabama | Registered: April 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Thank you
Very little
Picture of HRK
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Calling them to let them know is a good idea but no reason to pound a CS rep on the phone unless you think they coordinated the theft, sold the card and are part of a vast worldwide CC ring.

It could have been stolen months ago, they will get these numbers and hang on to them for a while, try and run thought a small charge, if it goes through they hit a big charge.

CC companies look for these patterns, I've had my AMEX number done a few times in the past years and the card is always in my wallet, one I had not used in a while, I suspect someone at a small shop I had used it at, but there is no wa to know..



"My rule of life prescribed as an absolutely sacred rite smoking cigars and also the drinking of alcohol before, after and if need be during all meals and in the intervals between them." Winston Churchill
 
Posts: 10830 | Location: Mouseville, FL | Registered: November 07, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I understand your pain.

Last Thursday we had 2 SEPARATE credit cards hacked. One was a Capital One MC and the other was a Barclay MC.
 
Posts: 1337 | Location: St. Louis, MO | Registered: November 24, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I understand your pain.
We were hit a few times. CC's were used in California and Arizona, haven't been that way in years.


So, before you get on the phone with CS and exact your pound of flesh, ask yourself this: How much flesh did you really loose? How much $ just came out of YOUR pocket?

I'm sure somewhere in the notification, there was a "Don't worry Mr. Rduckwor, your account has been credited the full amount." was said.


Don't get me wrong, it is a crime and hopefully the piece of shit that uses your CC# gets caught and rectaly violated with a red hot pipe while in prison. Doubtful, but one can hope, cant I?!?!

Local, State, feds and Inter-pol are all investigating this crime. Credit Card Companies & banks are all supporting Law Enforcement on this! It's a multi million dollar business. There's a bunch of Russian computer geeks sitting around computers right now, trying to hack into CC Company computers, there's some Hilljack in a trailer half baked on meth cranking out cards with random #'s on a stolen computer trying to do the same thing. There's a Nigerian that reeks of BO in an apartment doing the same thing...

Risk/Reward... for them, it pays off. and IF they get caught, little to nothing happens to them in court.


_____________________________________________________________________

"When its time to shoot, shoot. Dont talk!"

“What the government is good at is collecting taxes, taking away your freedoms and killing people. It’s not good at much else.” —Author Tom Clancy
 
Posts: 4866 | Location: Just moved: Downtown Chi-Town | Registered: February 14, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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They did mine through PayPal at Christmas time too
 
Posts: 528 | Location: Southern Michigan | Registered: May 30, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The only crime with no time.

There is zero effort or initiative to identify or enforce this type of fraud.

And despite what authorities want you to believe (so you will leave them alone) - most credit fraud here in the US is DOMESTIC, meaning the stolen cards are being used in the US to purchase products delivered to the US,
 
Posts: 1569 | Registered: April 20, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Had a company card that my drivers use get hacked. I'm thinking it was when they fueled up with diesel.
The credit card thieves then went out I-80 West charging gas at multiple stops.
We did get it fixed but it was a pain in the ass to do it.


I'd rather be hated for who I am than loved for who I'm not.
 
Posts: 1819 | Location: The armpit of Ohio | Registered: August 18, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Yeah I have been there. It sucks, you did nothing wrong. There was a thread a while back about an organized ring of Cubans in Miami running the scam with Gift cards.

They will overnight a card to you. My bank in the past allowed all local charges to go through that were made in person until I got the new card. It was time consuming to change all of the automatic charges to the account.
 
Posts: 2156 | Location: MS GULF COAST | Registered: January 02, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Of course, sometimes it has absolutely nothing to with where you used the card. It's a numbers game. They keep trying random numbers until they hit a live account. The numbers aren't even all that random, I think only the last five numbers of a CC are actually "you", the rest are bank, & vendor numbers. These numbers are pretty well known for the major players, Chase, Visa, etc, so that narrows it down for them somewhat.

and yeah, I'm not sure what you're going to accomplish by yelling at a few poor CS reps.....
 
Posts: 4789 | Location: East Texas | Registered: February 20, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posting without pants
Picture of KevinCW
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The only... and I mean ONLY... time my card was ever compromised... it was paypal.

Fuchs them. Fuchs their piss poor security, fuchsia their anti gun agenda, and fuchsia them for being the most popular venue for fraud.

Anyone who does business with them is an idiot.





Strive to live your life so when you wake up in the morning and your feet hit the floor, the devil says "Oh crap, he's up."
 
Posts: 31746 | Location: St. Louis MO | Registered: February 15, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
posting without pants
Picture of KevinCW
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Sigh, my auto correct brought to you by crayola....





Strive to live your life so when you wake up in the morning and your feet hit the floor, the devil says "Oh crap, he's up."
 
Posts: 31746 | Location: St. Louis MO | Registered: February 15, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Knows too little
about too much
Picture of rduckwor
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No CS super4visor were harmed in my rants. They were only mildly abraded.

Kevin: I suspect that you are correct about PisPal.

RMD




Some men are morally opposed to violence; they are protected by men who are not.
 
Posts: 18403 | Location: L.A. - Lower Alabama | Registered: April 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Sigforum K9 handler
Picture of jljones
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quote:
Originally posted by Graniteguy:
The only crime with no time.

There is zero effort or initiative to identify or enforce this type of fraud.

And despite what authorities want you to believe (so you will leave them alone) - most credit fraud here in the US is DOMESTIC, meaning the stolen cards are being used in the US to purchase products delivered to the US,


Yeah, no. Nice try though.

The goods are delivered and sold domestic, but the scam is off shore. All the actors with criminal intent are off shore.

The scams (including "Hi I'm from the IRS and I have a warrant unless you send me a green dot money card) start from places like Jamaica. They purchase credit card information for pennies on the dollar. They then place advertisements for "Mystery shoppers" domestically. They cut and paste a real enough looking contract, and send the CC information. The "mystery shopper" then uses the information to buy items and have them shipped to an address.

Now, the address is an unsuspecting rube that answered one of those "work from home and make $5,000 per month" ads. Guess what? They get a real looking contract, often purported to be a legitimate business who has no idea that their likeness is being used. These people receive the packages and repackage them and send them off again. The next location is the same "work from home" rube. It gets repackaged and sent off again. And again. Finally, it goes to an individual that sells the item. The money gets converted to a green dot money card, and gets phoned in to Jamaica. That money is used to start the cycle over again.

It is actually genius. They use human greed to get rich. The mystery shoppers and repackagers are promised great wealth. The shoppers and repackagers are told that not only do they get the $5k, they get a bonus for the volume they move. Both get told that they will be reimbursed for the money they spend in shipping. Five or six weeks go by, they don't get paid. The off shore folks move on to the next mark. There are plenty of them out there willing to believe that this is legit.

The absolute best part is when LE catches on. The find out the location and serve the search warrant for a repackager or mystery shopper. After the door is kicked, everyone is handcuffed, and the warrant is read, no charges can be filed. The mystery shopper and repackager have valid looking contracts and think what they are doing is legit. Therefore, there is no intent to commit a crime, and mystery shopping and repacking is not illegal. Being that dumb to believe that someone is going to pay you $5k plus bonuses is also not currently illegal.

The money men sit safely off shore and have nothing to fear of US Law Enforcement.

So, ignore the people that say that cops tell you it goes on offshore so you will leave them alone. They actually don't have a clue what they are talking about. All of the money goes back off shore in Green Dot money cards.


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Posts: 30475 | Location: Logical | Registered: September 12, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by jljones:
quote:
Originally posted by Graniteguy:
The only crime with no time.

There is zero effort or initiative to identify or enforce this type of fraud.

And despite what authorities want you to believe (so you will leave them alone) - most credit fraud here in the US is DOMESTIC, meaning the stolen cards are being used in the US to purchase products delivered to the US,


Yeah, no. Nice try though.

The goods are delivered and sold domestic, but the scam is off shore. All the actors with criminal intent are off shore.

The scams (including "Hi I'm from the IRS and I have a warrant unless you send me a green dot money card) start from places like Jamaica. They purchase credit card information for pennies on the dollar. They then place advertisements for "Mystery shoppers" domestically. They cut and paste a real enough looking contract, and send the CC information. The "mystery shopper" then uses the information to buy items and have them shipped to an address.

Now, the address is an unsuspecting rube that answered one of those "work from home and make $5,000 per month" ads. Guess what? They get a real looking contract, often purported to be a legitimate business who has no idea that their likeness is being used. These people receive the packages and repackage them and send them off again. The next location is the same "work from home" rube. It gets repackaged and sent off again. And again. Finally, it goes to an individual that sells the item. The money gets converted to a green dot money card, and gets phoned in to Jamaica. That money is used to start the cycle over again.

It is actually genius. They use human greed to get rich. The mystery shoppers and repackagers are promised great wealth. The shoppers and repackagers are told that not only do they get the $5k, they get a bonus for the volume they move. Both get told that they will be reimbursed for the money they spend in shipping. Five or six weeks go by, they don't get paid. The off shore folks move on to the next mark. There are plenty of them out there willing to believe that this is legit.

The absolute best part is when LE catches on. The find out the location and serve the search warrant for a repackager or mystery shopper. After the door is kicked, everyone is handcuffed, and the warrant is read, no charges can be filed. The mystery shopper and repackager have valid looking contracts and think what they are doing is legit. Therefore, there is no intent to commit a crime, and mystery shopping and repacking is not illegal. Being that dumb to believe that someone is going to pay you $5k plus bonuses is also not currently illegal.

The money men sit safely off shore and have nothing to fear of US Law Enforcement.

So, ignore the people that say that cops tell you it goes on offshore so you will leave them alone. They actually don't have a clue what they are talking about. All of the money goes back off shore in Green Dot money cards.


Yes, that is one method among hundreds that is utilized to perpetuate credit card fraud - and it is indeed brilliant.

I also agree that local law enforcement is powerless to impact this - it is a much bigger issue.
 
Posts: 1569 | Registered: April 20, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
On the DL
Picture of V-Tail
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Jerry Jones' description of shipping and re-shipping the goods in order to ultimately get the profit from credit card fraud to the off-shore miscreants reminds me of what goes on in aviation.

The popular communication & navigation equipment for General Aviation aircraft retails for upwards of ten thousand bucks per unit; some go for a lot more than that.

Theft rings get orders from buyers in other countries, for a specific type of unit. The thieves will fly into an airport at night, either an airport with no control tower (probably fewer than 5% of the airports in the U.S. have towers), or an airport with a tower that does not operate 24 hours / day.

It's not too difficult to get into a parked airplane, much easier than it is to get into an automobile, and we've all seen "Gone in 60 Seconds."

These avionics units need to be easily removable for service. Typically all that is required is a 3/32" Allen wrench and you can pull the box in less than a minute.

So, the routine is, the thieves pick two airplanes that have the desired equipment. They take the box from airplane 'A' and install it in airplane 'B' and they sell the box from airplane 'B' to the fence. The owner of airplane 'A' reports the theft. The owner of airplane 'B' does not realize that his box has been stolen, as the box from airplane 'A' is in his ('B') airplane, so the serial number of the box that is sold to the fence does not appear on any stolen equipment database.

Owner 'B' is in for a rude awakening if / when the box in his airplane needs maintenance. The service shops routinely check serial numbers when they receive a unit for service, and the innocent owner 'B' does not realize that the box that he thinks is his, is actually the one with the serial number that 'A' as reported stolen.

How do I know this? My airplane was hit twice this way, radio / communication / navigation units being stolen for export. I got hit twice at the same airport, about ten years apart. First time, July 4th weekend 1994, second time about ten years later. Both times, there were multiple airplanes hit the same night.



A mind is a terrible thing.
 
Posts: 15734 | Location: Central Florida (near Orlando) | Registered: January 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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[quote]Owner 'B' is in for a rude awakening if / when the box in his airplane needs maintenance. The service shops routinely check serial numbers when they receive a unit for service, and the innocent owner 'B' does not realize that the box that he thinks is his, is actually the one with the serial number that 'A' as reported stolen.

How do I know this? My airplane was hit twice this way, radio / communication / navigation units being stolen for export. I got hit twice at the same airport, about ten years apart. First time, July 4th weekend 1994, second time about ten years later. Both times, there were multiple airplanes hit the same night.


This reads like Paul Harvey. Where is the Rest of the Story?? How did you work this out? Thanks
 
Posts: 2156 | Location: MS GULF COAST | Registered: January 02, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
On the DL
Picture of V-Tail
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quote:
Originally posted by ZSMICHAEL:
This reads like Paul Harvey. Where is the Rest of the Story?? How did you work this out? Thanks
In both occurrences I was the 'A' victim; the thieves did not install somebody else's equipment in my airplane.

I did report the theft to the FBI; they have jurisdiction since tampering with U.S. registered aircraft is a federal offense, but they did not seem to care.

Of course I also reported to my insurance carrier and my equipment was replaced via my insurance coverage.

AS far as owner 'B' in my case, we were not able identify who this was, but the routine for shuffling the equipment from one airplane to another to obscure reporting of theft by serial number is a well known technique of these theft rings. It is almost guaranteed that if radio equipment is stolen from an airplane, the equipment will be swapped into a second airplane and the equipment from the second airplane will be sold to an unethical export broker by the thieves.



A mind is a terrible thing.
 
Posts: 15734 | Location: Central Florida (near Orlando) | Registered: January 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Our debit cards got compromised yesterday. They also made mobile transfers straight from our checking account to some other account. Cards and account are now shutdown and a new account is being setup. They only hit us for about $200. But it's taken a bit of time to get it all taken care of. I wrote Senator Cruz asking for more to be done. This is ridiculous. Like mandatory jail time for first offense.
 
Posts: 2961 | Location: Texas | Registered: October 04, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Although most banks want you to have a debit card for each checking account (Chase makes it part of the "account opening" package), I always decline and have the card disabled. Debit cards are just one more vector directly to your funds. When I go to Chase, they always ask for my debit card so they can bring up my account on their computer. I say Nope, and then recite my checking account number from memory. A DL will also work for their purposes of accessing the account.
 
I use credit cards, paid in full each month, plus I accumulate reward points that add up to some nice case every few months.
 
 
Posts: 6882 | Location: South Congress AZ | Registered: May 27, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The last couple of cases that I have worked have been sorta interesting. One was $1200 worth of Poppa Johns gift cards. The CC company told me that Poppa Johns would have to eat that. They were getting their money back. The next case I got more of the same from that bank.

Seems that the end consumer is the one eating the fraud, not the victim or CC companies. I guess that is good in a way, as it might make them a little more wary of what they accept, and what they don't.


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"Make it a shooting, and not a gunfight" LSP552 02/19/2011

"There are only two reasons why a proven technique doesn't work under stress: the shooter isn't adequately trained in it's application, or he/she doesn't really believe it will work because he/she is programmed for failure to begin with." BG

 
Posts: 30475 | Location: Logical | Registered: September 12, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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