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Loved those Texas
one room schools
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I was able to retire at 55. I took a number of low stress jobs for about 10 more years then retired totally. Now I don't miss working anymore. From time to time I give some thought to model railroading. Its great to do things on impulse or to just enjoy reading, walking and playing with the dog.

My wife is a great companion. Cincinnati has a great library system.

Life is great.


_________________________
"Louis was furious with the sharks. He thought they had an understanding: The men would stay out of the sharks' turf - the water - and the sharks would stay off theirs - the raft...If the sharks were going to try to eat him, he was going to try to eat them." From Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand
 
Posts: 1845 | Location: Cincinnati, Ohio | Registered: May 26, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Three Generations
of Service
Picture of PHPaul
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quote:
Originally posted by jimmy123x:

The big issue of why I see guys not wanting to retire is after being married so long, they don't want to spend 24/7 with their wife.....


Seriously, that IS a factor. Not so much in my case as I worked part time for the last 3 years (all I could find at that age...) so it was more gradual.

But for guys that work(ed) long hours, suddenly being home 24/7 can require some adjustment. The Mrs. has been doing things her way for XX years and may not find your "help" or "suggestions" particularly useful.

Tread lightly...
 
Posts: 9906 | Location: Downeast Maine | Registered: March 10, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Staring back
from the abyss
Picture of Gustofer
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quote:
Originally posted by MNSIG:
quote:
Originally posted by 12131:
I plan to work until I croak. Smile


Not sure I'll practice until I croak, but I'm no hurry to quit either. After 25 years, I feel like I'm at the top of my game and enjoy what I do. I understand that other occupations place much higher physical demands on aging bodies and being an employee instead of the boss has the potential to suck. Both are good reasons that people want to retire early.

I'm with you guys. I don't see retirement happening until into my 70s as I really have no reason to. I enjoy the hell out of my job, I'm damn good at what I do, it's not physically taxing in any way, and I only work a week on/week off schedule. Hell, I'm semi-retired already. Only problem is that the week on is 24/7 call. Otherwise, I can pretty much do what I want when I want now and still get a paycheck. Why change?


________________________________________________________

"How dreadful are the curses which Mohammedanism lays on its votaries! Besides the fanatical frenzy, which is as dangerous in a man as hydrophobia in a dog, there is this fearful fatalistic apathy." Winston Churchill
 
Posts: 13654 | Location: Montana | Registered: November 01, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
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quote:
Originally posted by Gustofer:
quote:
Originally posted by MNSIG:
quote:
Originally posted by 12131:
I plan to work until I croak. Smile


Not sure I'll practice until I croak, but I'm no hurry to quit either. After 25 years, I feel like I'm at the top of my game and enjoy what I do. I understand that other occupations place much higher physical demands on aging bodies and being an employee instead of the boss has the potential to suck. Both are good reasons that people want to retire early.

I'm with you guys. I don't see retirement happening until into my 70s as I really have no reason to. I enjoy the hell out of my job, I'm damn good at what I do, it's not physically taxing in any way, and I only work a week on/week off schedule. Hell, I'm semi-retired already. Only problem is that the week on is 24/7 call. Otherwise, I can pretty much do what I want when I want now and still get a paycheck. Why change?


I think that is great as well! Based on older threads, you’ve both worked hard to get to where you are and if you enjoy it, great!




Looking for an Alaskan Malamute? Look here: http://www.moonsongmals.org
Do not send me to a heaven where there are no dogs.
Step Up or Stand Aside: Support the Troops !
 
Posts: 6687 | Location: West | Registered: November 26, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by jimmy123x:

The big issue of why I see guys not wanting to retire is after being married so long, they don't want to spend 24/7 with their wife.....


One of the telco sites I was in, electronic tech is in his early 70s and pretty chatty - he told me the reason that he came back to work (un-retired) was he realized that he had too much time on his hands and was probably going to die early.

I expressed my surprise, he said "My wife told me if I don't get the heck out of the house she was gonna kill me!"



<><
America, Land of the Free - because of the Brave
 
Posts: 1298 | Location: Fort Lauderdale, FL - its a dry heat....... | Registered: January 26, 2001Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I'm about 14 months away from pushing the retirement button. I can't imagine how I could possibly be bored with all the unfinished projects I've accumulated. It'll probably be tough to find time for trips to the range but I feel like I'm up to the task.
 
Posts: 77 | Location: SE Michigan | Registered: June 15, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Do No Harm,
Do Know Harm
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My goal is 52. That’s when I can retire on my full police pension. I’m working on saving as much as I can on top.


-------------------------------
Knowing what one is talking about is widely admired but not strictly required here.

Although sometimes distracting, there is often a certain entertainment value to this easy standard.
-JALLEN

"All I need is a WAR ON DRUGS reference and I got myself a police thread BINGO." -jljones
 
Posts: 9535 | Location: NC | Registered: August 16, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I retired as soon as I made 59 1/2 . No regrets . Yes , my income dropped like a rock , but it's not about money . My stress level went from a 10 to a 2 . I got a part time job at my son's company for a few hours a day and I volunteer at the Food Bank every Thursday . I'm content .
 
Posts: 1366 | Location: The deep South | Registered: February 27, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
In Vino Veritas
Picture of Jaycat
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I'm retiring next year. I am 49 now. We just bought a house in Tennessee. After 23 years in le in California, I cant wait!


Good...Bad...I'm the guy with the gun!!!
 
Posts: 866 | Registered: November 06, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Make sure you will have health insurance, as Medicare does not kick in until you turn 65! We're in good shape for coverage, Medicare and TriCare, thankfully we don't use it much.

A lot of pals work for local LE agencies, they have great health coverage but lose it when they retire. If a spouse has insurance thru work they're OK, but otherwise they pay a whole lot.

Yeah, this is slightly off topic, but it's a critical part of the retirement plan.
 
Posts: 12506 | Location: Eastern Iowa | Registered: May 21, 2000Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of LimaCharlie
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I retired from the Army at 39 with twelve years of Navy service and ten years of Army service.

I was a staff engineer and took an early retirement and severance package during a merger of corporations when I was fifty-three.

I managed a service center, customer call center, and credit & collections department. I accepted a severance package during a corporate downsizing when I was fifty-five.

I was a Realtor until I retired at fifty-eight.

I got bored and sold luxury brand cars until I retired at sixty.

I was a consultant for a law enforcement agency until I retired at sixty-five.

I am now seventy-one and volunteer at a private gun range as a range safety officer and instructor.


U.S. Army, Retired
 
Posts: 3471 | Location: Northwest Oregon | Registered: June 12, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Nullus Anxietas
Picture of ensigmatic
posted Hide Post
quote:
Originally posted by PHPaul:
quote:
Originally posted by jimmy123x:
The big issue of why I see guys not wanting to retire is after being married so long, they don't want to spend 24/7 with their wife.....

Seriously, that IS a factor. Not so much in my case as I worked part time for the last 3 years (all I could find at that age...) so it was more gradual.

Eh... *shrug* We haven't found it a problem, but we each have our own interests. Where they converge: Great. Where they do not: Also great. We see more of each other than we used to, but not so much so as we're getting on each others' nerves.

quote:
Originally posted by PHPaul:
But for guys that work(ed) long hours, suddenly being home 24/7 can require some adjustment. The Mrs. has been doing things her way for XX years and may not find your "help" or "suggestions" particularly useful.

Tread lightly...

That works both ways.

When I retired it seemed only right that she got to retire, as well. So I took over many of the more mundane tasks she used to do that don't require much in the way of skill. (None at all, actually.) Vacuuming, dusting, litter box cleanup duty. Stuff like that.

Now she's from Europe, where cannister vacuums rule. So she's always bought cannister vacuums. I grew up with uprights, which are more common/traditional here in the U.S. So when I took over that job, I tried working with what worked for her. Hated it. So now I'm getting it done with a Shark upright. Two or three times she's started up with "If you were using a cannister..." Finally I said "This is my job, now. Please let me do it in the way I like to do it." She finally conceded that, if I'm going to be expected to do it, I ought to be left alone to do it in the way that suits me best.

I don't dust the way she does, either. But she did concede there were advantages to the way I do it, too.

We're happy, and still love one another six months into retirement, so... Smile




"America is at that awkward stage. It's too late to work within the system,,,, but too early to shoot the bastards." -- Claire Wolfe
 
Posts: 12707 | Location: S.E. Michigan | Registered: January 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Sigmund:
Make sure you will have health insurance, as Medicare does not kick in until you turn 65! We're in good shape for coverage, Medicare and TriCare, thankfully we don't use it much.

A lot of pals work for local LE agencies, they have great health coverage but lose it when they retire. If a spouse has insurance thru work they're OK, but otherwise they pay a whole lot.

Yeah, this is slightly off topic, but it's a critical part of the retirement plan.


It is a valid point. I have some plans and options for that as well. Ultimately, my goal is 55 but it may be closer to 59 1/2.

The wife and I are planning for that as well.




Looking for an Alaskan Malamute? Look here: http://www.moonsongmals.org
Do not send me to a heaven where there are no dogs.
Step Up or Stand Aside: Support the Troops !
 
Posts: 6687 | Location: West | Registered: November 26, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of grumpy1
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I retired a couple years ago at 64 and love it. Not having to do anything particular at any particular time is something I love. Staying up late and sleeping late is no problem. Going to the range on weekdays is a big plus. Stress level went way down as did BP. I married a you girl who is only 60 now and will be probably working another 6 years and that is how I get my health insurance. I won't withdraw from my IRAs until I have too. I don't get bored as there is always something to do, if I want to, and take as long as I want to. Going to get a performance car probably next spring and trying to decide what to get and researching that now. Been a long time since I had a nice car for myself and looking forward to it.


“When the people find that they can vote themselves money that will herald the end of the republic.”
― Benjamin Franklin
"The problem with socialism is that eventually you run out of other people's money."
― Margaret Thatcher
 
Posts: 8011 | Location: Northern Illinois | Registered: March 20, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Eschew Obfuscation
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One month to go for me.

While I doubt I'll be bored, my view is "so what?" It's our retirement and if we feel like being bored, it's because we feel like being bored.


_____________________________________________________________________

NRA Endowment Life Member; ISRA Member
_____________________________________________________________________

“It is amazing how many people think that they can answer an argument by attributing bad motives to those who disagree with them. Using this kind of reasoning, you can believe or not believe anything about anything, without having to bother to deal with facts or logic.” ― Thomas Sowell
 
Posts: 3898 | Location: Chicago, IL | Registered: December 17, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Objectively Reasonable
Picture of DennisM
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A retiree from my outfit went "cold turkey." 30 years of shift work, TDYs, call-outs, and the like... to 24/7 with his wife.

I called his "hard line" a few months after he retired (cell number was acting up.) Wife answered. No, he wasn't home... but "Dennis, you've GOT to get him the <expletive> out of here. He's driving me <expletive> crazy." This from a Sunday-school teacher. Apparently he was being very... helpful in her home-based business.

Two weeks later, she tells him they're going our for dinner. Just them. Nice restaurant, dressed up, good bottle of wine. Time for a "grown-up" talk. Summary? He's getting a job. Or a volunteer gig. Or a hobby, a time-consuming hobby. Or a freakin' girlfriend on the side. She didn't care which, but his ass was getting out from underfoot a few days a week.

Apparently. semi-retirement suits them BOTH better.
 
Posts: 1326 | Registered: January 01, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by DennisM:
A retiree from my outfit went "cold turkey." 30 years of shift work, TDYs, call-outs, and the like... to 24/7 with his wife...


My already retired pals made it very clear that I when I retired it was essential to give my wife space or stay out of her way, whichever worked better. She had been fully retired for about five years before I retired and had the house to herself every weekday.

Between the shootin' range and other activities, I've stayed out of Mrs. Sigmund's way the past year, except when we're on vacation together. So far it's worked.
 
Posts: 12506 | Location: Eastern Iowa | Registered: May 21, 2000Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I get bored often. A nap usually fixed it
 
Posts: 223 | Registered: November 07, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Member
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quote:
Originally posted by grumpy1 Stress level went way down as did BP.


Lower BP is something I'd appreciate. Mine is typically 20 points higher at work than on a day off. Not that anything bad is happening there, just the nature of the business. Obviously, my overall fitness and cardiovascular health don't change on a daily basis to account for the difference.
 
Posts: 6765 | Location: The Red part of Minnesota | Registered: October 06, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I get 6% each paycheck put away. im in my 20's so is that a good amount to be saving in a 401? I also get retirement after five on my currant job, close to full after 20 years.


I am Groot
 
Posts: 360 | Location: North Ga | Registered: August 06, 2016Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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