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quote:
Originally posted by phydough:
I was at the gas pumps today and this beat up late 90's Dodge pulled in turning around 100 decibels and smoking like a steam engine. The next truck pulled in so very quietly, I didn't realize it was a diesel. Louder than a Prius but not by much. It was a brand new Dodge, still with the temp plate on. Hard to believe that the same basic engine and 20 some odd years of development can be so different.


We got an F350 last March, it's a 2017 model. I can't believe how quiet it is, compared to older models. Now, we're looking to upgrade our RV to a fifth wheel.
 
Posts: 48 | Location: Logan, Utah | Registered: April 29, 2018Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Age Quod Agis
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It used to be pretty common around here in west central Florida. The coal rollers have all gone to full high lift jack ups, instead. Huge tires, powder coated off road suspension, two or more shocks per tire, and blue lights under the frame and wheel wells, open pipes or glass packs.

We call them "compensators",'cause they must be making up for something...



"We may consent to be governed, but we will not be ruled." - Kevin D. Williamson, 2012

"All the citizens of this land are of right freemen; they owe no allegiance to any class and should recognize no task-masters. Under the chart of their liberties, under the law of high heaven, they are free and without shackles on their limbs nor mortgages upon the fruits of their brain or muscles; they bow down before no prince, potentate, or sovereign, nor kiss the royal robes of any crowned head; they render homage only to their God and should pay tribute only to their Government. Such at least is the spirit of our institutions, the character of our written national compact."

Charles Triplett O’Ferrall of Virginia - In Congress, May 1, 1888
 
Posts: 9468 | Location: Central Florida | Registered: November 02, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of akcopnfbks
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Originally posted by jhe888:
quote:
Originally posted by wolfe 21:
"Big truck, little dick" pretty much sums it up.
Around here they are usually under 25 & likely spending parents money on fuel so they don't care.


My wife and I call them "tiny penis" trucks.

This includes the one guy riding in a lifted 1 ton truck, extended cab, giant wheels and knobby tires, racks of lights, and brush guards.


LOL! My better-half & I do something similar. When we go to a restaurant, for example, and notice one of those trucks parked in the lot she says, "Uh oh honey, looks like I'm leaving with a new man!".....I pretend to be upset, ask her what I need to do to my truck to get her to stay, etc., then go inside & make a game out of guessing which person the truck belongs to. It's quite entertaining.


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Posts: 1410 | Location: The Northernmost Broadcast Point of Radio Free America | Registered: February 24, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by 2012BOSS302:
I've been coal rolled out riding on my bicycle, apparently they are threatened by bicyclists. One guy passed me coming up to a stop sign and just dumped it as he took off, the breeze moved it over onto the house on the corner and covered it. I imagine the homeowner wasn't too happy.


I work with a guy who thinks this is especially funny. Did it pedestrians on along a bridge out of our town and proceeded to tell everyone at work about it. He's well into his 40s.


A Perpetual Disappointment...
 
Posts: 2048 | Registered: August 05, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I once had some twit do that to me while I was driving my old minivan. I followed him into the Home Depot and called him an asshole. He got all bent that I’d use language in front of his kid. I reminded him that he is the one presenting a shitty example, and as his father, is more likely to imprint on him than my calling him an asshole. He actually apologized.

My diesel truck is 14.8 liters and lays down 2100 foot pounds of torque. Your little pickup doesn’t impress me.

Also, if you like diesel, you should hate these guys. People seeing all the smoke is how we get increasing emission standards on diesels and a citizenry that is ok with it.



Hannibal ad portas. Carthago delenda est.
 
Posts: 5686 | Location: Utah | Registered: December 18, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by sigcrazy7:
Also, if you like diesel, you should hate these guys. People seeing all the smoke is how we get increasing emission standards on diesels and a citizenry that is ok with it.


Funny how that works.
Not all diesel truck owners are alpha hotels, but just like anything else, it only takes a few to affect everyone.




“Most men … can seldom accept the simplest and most obvious truth if it … would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions … which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabrics of their lives.”
— Leo Tolstoy
 
Posts: 38676 | Location: 10,150 Feet Above Sea Level in Colorado | Registered: April 04, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by sigcrazy7:
Also, if you like diesel, you should hate these guys. People seeing all the smoke is how we get increasing emission standards on diesels and a citizenry that is ok with it.


A very good point.



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Posts: 8383 | Location: Hokie Nation! | Registered: July 15, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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During the summer, I eat lunch with a couple buddies at a restaurant with outdoor seating. Periodically, some asshat pulls up with his knocken' diesel and has to leave it running while he runs in for a takeout.

One of us is forced to say, "Hey pal, would you shut that off. We don't want to hear it or smell it."

After a dirty look, they ususally do.

Looooosers



I'm sorry if I hurt you feelings when I called you stupid - I thought you already knew - Unknown
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Posts: 1500 | Location: Kalispell Montana & Florida’s Emerald Coast for the Winter | Registered: December 24, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by mcrimm:
During the summer, I eat lunch with a couple buddies at a restaurant with outdoor seating. Periodically, some asshat pulls up with his knocken' diesel and has to leave it running while he runs in for a takeout.
I'm curious. Can anyone 'splain to me why these diesel dudes think it's necessary to leave the engine running, when the same person driving a gas powered vehicle would shut it off while picking something up at a restaurant or a store?



A mind is a terrible thing.
 
Posts: 19009 | Location: Central Florida (near Orlando) | Registered: January 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
chickenshit
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quote:
Originally posted by V-Tail:
quote:
Originally posted by mcrimm:
During the summer, I eat lunch with a couple buddies at a restaurant with outdoor seating. Periodically, some asshat pulls up with his knocken' diesel and has to leave it running while he runs in for a takeout.
I'm curious. Can anyone 'splain to me why these diesel dudes think it's necessary to leave the engine running, when the same person driving a gas powered vehicle would shut it off while picking something up at a restaurant or a store?


I'm not sure, but I do know when I was "trained" on my RV (40' diesel pusher with a 350hp Cat engine) they told me to leave the thing running if I'd be stopped for only a few minutes.

I can't claim to know why.


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Posts: 6609 | Location: East Central FL | Registered: January 05, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Because 30 years ago you'd have to wait for the glow-plug light to go out in order to start the vehicle.





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Posts: 5494 | Location: Atlanta | Registered: April 23, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by Shaql:
Because 30 years ago you'd have to wait for the glow-plug light to go out in order to start the vehicle.
Forty years ago (forty-two, but who's counting?) I had a 1976 Mercedes 240 D. There was a large knob, maybe 1.5" diameter, that had a couple of functions. It had a glow-plug indicator light in the center, and as you said, you needed to wait for the light to turn off before engaging the starter.

However, if the engine had just been running recently and was still warm, as in getting fuel, or running into a store, the light flickered for an instant or might not even come on at all. It was good for an immediate restart. That's why I asked the question about leaving the engine running, when it would not be left running in a gas powered vehicle.
I did have a situation where I left the diesel running, for a valid reason. I was assigned to a project in the Denver area. On really cold winter days, the combination of altitude and sub-zero temperatures guaranteed that the car would not start at the end of the work day, no matter how long I left the glow plugs on. After the second time that this happened, I took to bringing a spare key with me and leaving the engine running in the parking lot with the doors locked. Never had a cold-start problem when I did this Smile and a side benefit was a toasty warm car when the ambient temperature was below zero.



A mind is a terrible thing.
 
Posts: 19009 | Location: Central Florida (near Orlando) | Registered: January 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Diesel engines fire not by spark like a gas engine, but through heat and compression. Back before a computer controlled the flame wall through advanced injector firing techniques, a mechanical pump and cam fired a much less efficient jet of fuel into the cylinder. Therefore, when the engine was cold, it was common for the diesel to not completely combust or not combust at all, washing fuel down the cylinder walls and accumulating in the oil. In other words, it’s hard on diesel engines to run cold, so the prevailing idea was that leaving them idling was better than multiple starting and stopping. I used to have a truck with a CAT 4106B, a mechanical engine. When started on a cold day, the raw fuel would run out of the exhaust manifold before the turbo, and the smoke, oh the smoke!

Before somebody objects and says “what about the glow plugs!”, know that large diesels don’t have glow plugs. Even older diesels with glow plugs had mechanical control, like the Mercedes with the “salt shaker” resistive indicator on the dash. My old diesel rabbit used to have a mechanical timing advance to help with cold starts. Everybody wants their diesel to be like a big truck and do what the truckers do, hence the idea to leave them running. The larger the diesel, the harder it was to start. My father worked for the railroad. Back in his day, they never turned off a locomotive, unless it went in the shop. They idled them overnight.

Now, with computer fired injectors making multiple firings into a growing flame wall, there is no unburned fuel in a cold engine, so there is no reason to idle a diesel. You can start a Cummins ISX CM871 when it’s zero degrees outside, and it won’t even produce any white smoke with how complete is the combustion.



Hannibal ad portas. Carthago delenda est.
 
Posts: 5686 | Location: Utah | Registered: December 18, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Have a 2000 Dodge with 5.9 Cummings. Owners manual gives engine cool-off times based upon load truck has been run to protect the turbo. Example is 30 seconds from light driving with no load to 5 minutes if driven on highway towing a heavy load. I believe it is 'coking' creating abrasive particles in the hot oil sitting in the turbo causing premature wear on turbo bearings. Don't know about newer trucks?
My truck emits a very light darker exhaust during acceleration when the truck is at altitude Also occurs at hot OA temperatures.
This generation of engines is definitely noisier than the newest generation of diesels, but my truck has been paid for since 2000, and I have no intention of paying what they want for even newer used diesels. My truck is used for towing, getting firewood, hauling gravel, and other loads, not getting groceries, etc. Tons of diesels out west and here in the Black Hills, and most are working trucks or RV hauling.


Jim
 
Posts: 901 | Location: Hot Springs S.D. | Registered: September 14, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by walkinghorse:
Have a 2000 Dodge with 5.9 Cummings. Owners manual gives engine cool-off times based upon load truck has been run to protect the turbo. Example is 30 seconds from light driving with no load to 5 minutes if driven on highway towing a heavy load. I believe it is 'coking' creating abrasive particles in the hot oil sitting in the turbo causing premature wear on turbo bearings. Don't know about newer trucks?


I’ve given some thought to the idea of idling to cool the turbo. If it is important for Diesel engines, shouldn’t it apply also to gas engines with turbo induction? The only variable I see is combustion temperature being lower in a gas engine, so the turbo would be cooler. With newer EGR on diesels, I’d think the combustion temperature is also lower on diesels. Just a thought. I’d love to hear from someone who definitely knew why diesels needing idling to cool turbos while gas engines do not.

Newer big diesels have water-cooled turbos, so the value of idling to cool the turbo is not really necessary. Old habits and practices persist, though, so people still do.

One side note: Synthetic oils don’t coke as readily as mineral oils. Do yourself a favor and run synthetic oil. Mineral oil cokes above 600 degrees.



Hannibal ad portas. Carthago delenda est.
 
Posts: 5686 | Location: Utah | Registered: December 18, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by sigcrazy7:

I’ve given some thought to the idea of idling to cool the turbo. If it is important for Diesel engines, shouldn’t it apply also to gas engines with turbo induction?
I don't know about current car engines, but I do know that the mid 1980s Volvo cars with turbocharged gas engines carried admonishment to let the engine idle for the turbo to cool down, before shutting it off.

I do have experience flying airplanes with turbocharged piston engines. We are told to make power reductions very gradually, no more than 1" MP per minute, in order to minimize the rate of temperature change, and to let the engines idle for the turbos to cool prior to shutdown.

The requirement for gradual power reductions has led to spirited "discussions" with Air Traffic Control on more than one occasion, when I have requested a lower altitude early in the arrival phase, my request denied, then ATC wants a last minute slam dunk to get down right now. Sorry, that won't work, I'm not going to pull power back all of a sudden in order to make a "right now" descent. Those engines aren't cheap to overhaul.



A mind is a terrible thing.
 
Posts: 19009 | Location: Central Florida (near Orlando) | Registered: January 03, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by sigcrazy7:
quote:
Originally posted by walkinghorse:
Have a 2000 Dodge with 5.9 Cummings. Owners manual gives engine cool-off times based upon load truck has been run to protect the turbo. Example is 30 seconds from light driving with no load to 5 minutes if driven on highway towing a heavy load. I believe it is 'coking' creating abrasive particles in the hot oil sitting in the turbo causing premature wear on turbo bearings. Don't know about newer trucks?


I’ve given some thought to the idea of idling to cool the turbo. If it is important for Diesel engines, shouldn’t it apply also to gas engines with turbo induction? The only variable I see is combustion temperature being lower in a gas engine, so the turbo would be cooler. With newer EGR on diesels, I’d think the combustion temperature is also lower on diesels. Just a thought. I’d love to hear from someone who definitely knew why diesels needing idling to cool turbos while gas engines do not.

Newer big diesels have water-cooled turbos, so the value of idling to cool the turbo is not really necessary. Old habits and practices persist, though, so people still do.

One side note: Synthetic oils don’t coke as readily as mineral oils. Do yourself a favor and run synthetic oil. Mineral oil cokes above 600 degrees.


Why does oil in diesel get black quicker than oil in gasoline engines, maybe suspended particles, which is why diesel oils and gasoline oils are different. As stated previously gasoline and diesel engines are different processes. Particles suspended are abrasive, and synthetic diesel oils still have particles. Synthetic oils do have a lot of advantages, but at a cost! Being retired cost enters into things. As well as oil change intervals based upon time and season rather than mileage, and 11 quarts vs. 5 quarts is lots of dollars.
People driving gasoline vehicles get annoyed with people driving diesel vehicles, and vice versus, electric car people say all combustion engines are out dated. The rest of the world seems to like diesels and the U. S. seems to be against diesels, maybe government influence/ prejudice, say EPA? Discourteous drivers drive gasoline vehicles, diesel vehicles, electric vehicles, small vehicles, big vehicles, trucks, cars, motorcycles, and each of these have advantages and disadvantages.
Maybe the rant should be people who are obnoxious or discourteous and nothing will change that! Wink


Jim
 
Posts: 901 | Location: Hot Springs S.D. | Registered: September 14, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Originally posted by walkinghorse:
Why does oil in diesel get black quicker than oil in gasoline engines, maybe suspended particles, which is why diesel oils and gasoline oils are different. As stated previously gasoline and diesel engines are different processes. Particles suspended are abrasive, and synthetic diesel oils still have particles. Synthetic oils do have a lot of advantages, but at a cost! Being retired cost enters into things. As well as oil change intervals based upon time and season rather than mileage, and 11 quarts vs. 5 quarts is lots of dollars.


It’s true that synthetics are more expensive, but in the long run it saves money. I recently switched a Cummins ISX over from Rotella T4 conventional to T6 full synthetic. The engine requires 44 quarts of oil, so the up-charge was $200, making a $300 oil change nearly $500. Over the life of the oil, my mileage went up .2 mpg, from an average of 6.1 up to 6.3. This lowered my fuel bill about $1400 over the life of the oil. Switching to synthetic saved me $1200, before factoring more esoteric benefits like reduced wear at startup, lower oil temperature, and increased oil pressure.

There is no area where conventional oil makes a stronger use case, except maybe during new engine break-in, and perhaps in old flat tappet engines that need more ZDDP.

As for the OP's complaint, it isn't so much about diesel drivers as a whole, but those who specifically go out and purchase a chip mod so they can throw a switch on their dash to allow their truck to grossly over fuel, specifically to produce a prodigious amount of smoke. This isn't so much about the diesel vs gas vs electric debate, but more about a certain type of purposeful douchebaggery wrt diesel modifications.



Hannibal ad portas. Carthago delenda est.
 
Posts: 5686 | Location: Utah | Registered: December 18, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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We have them in Kansas as well. With any luck they will have low sperm counts and injector problems.


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Posts: 2701 | Location: sunflower state | Registered: January 31, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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As for the OP's complaint, it isn't so much about diesel drivers as a whole, but those who specifically go out and purchase a chip mod so they can throw a switch on their dash to allow their truck to grossly over fuel, specifically to produce a prodigious amount of smoke. This isn't so much about the diesel vs gas vs electric debate, but more about a certain type of purposeful douchebaggery wrt diesel modifications.


Agree!


Jim
 
Posts: 901 | Location: Hot Springs S.D. | Registered: September 14, 2012Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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