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After 500 to 600 rounds through my new P320, I got to wondering about the best way to clean the fire control module. Any suggestions?
 
Posts: 99 | Registered: January 14, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I remove the FCU and spray it liberally with brake cleaner (non chlorinated). After it dries apply lube of choice.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: az4783054,


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Posts: 7734 | Location: Somewhere north of a hot humid hell in the summer. | Registered: January 09, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks.
 
Posts: 99 | Registered: January 14, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Best option is "Hornaday One Shot" gun cleaner and dry lube. This is in a black spray can. ( The red can is One Shot case lube) The spray cleans and flushes the firing system and when it dries it leaves behind a great dry lube. This is the best system of cleaning when you can not completely disassemble. Also great if you own a Remington Nylon 66. If you own one you know what I mean. Smile
 
Posts: 1052 | Location: Tampa Bay, Florida | Registered: July 06, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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^^^ Sounds interesting. Simple and easy...my favorite combo. Smile Think I'll give it a try.

I occasionally detail strip my classic P-series and 1911's for a thorough cleaning. No problem Have no interest in pulling apart the P320 FCU with it's springs and small parts for cleaning.


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Posts: 3922 | Location: Northeast | Registered: June 29, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Just spray it with brake cleaner. I use Slip2000 EWL. Lightly coat the rails and bearing surfaced. NONE in the striker assembly.

Frankly, I only clean mine every few thousand.


Richard Scalzo
Epping, NH

http://www.bigeastakitarescue.net
 
Posts: 4418 | Location: Epping, NH | Registered: October 16, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Question for you brake cleaner guys. Since it's not specifically designed for firearms use, any risk of damage to the FCU components?

Thanks.


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Posts: 3922 | Location: Northeast | Registered: June 29, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The slide catch lever post is, IIRC, made of plastic.
Although it’s in the slide, the striker assembly has a couple of plastic parts as well.




“Most men … can seldom accept the simplest and most obvious truth if it … would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions … which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabrics of their lives.”
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Posts: 37143 | Location: 10,150 Feet Above Sea Level in Colorado | Registered: April 04, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Nipper:
Question for you brake cleaner guys. Since it's not specifically designed for firearms use, any risk of damage to the FCU components?

Thanks.


Markedly similar solvent compounds to non-chlorinated brake cleaner are sold as firearm cleaners under several different brands, such as "Birchwood Casey Gun Scrubber" and "Breakfree Powder Blast".

It's just cheaper to buy the generic non-chlorinated brake cleaner from the auto parts store than to buy the name brand stuff from the sporting goods store at a markup.

These products will not harm metal components. They're great for quickly cleaning and degreasing barrels, metal frames, slides, etc., and work well at removing cosmoline from metal parts. But they should be kept away from paint, wood, rubber, and plastic. They'll strip paint and wood finishes, and can break down rubber and some plastics.

Therefore, if any components of the FCU are plastic, I'd advise against simply hosing the FCU down with one of those solvent sprays. (I believe sigfruend is correct; the post that holds that spring on the underside of the slide lock lever is plastic. There may be other components too.)

Also note that metal that's been cleaned with these products will be completely dry and oil-free afterwards, so you'll need to be sure to fully oil/lube all the metal surfaces after cleaning.
 
Posts: 19005 | Location: Northwest Arkansas | Registered: January 06, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks for the tutorial on brake cleaners. Apparently, the devil is in the plastic details.

I guess I'm a closet brake cleaner user. I've used Birchwood Casey Gun Scrubber on traditional metal internal parts on my Classic Sigs, 1911's and revolvers.


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Posts: 3922 | Location: Northeast | Registered: June 29, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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There may be other components too.)


Don't believe so. But I've used it for years and it didn't degrade any plastic parts. It will destroy paint or poly.


Richard Scalzo
Epping, NH

http://www.bigeastakitarescue.net
 
Posts: 4418 | Location: Epping, NH | Registered: October 16, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Be cautious of the older online videos on stripping the 320. I have a 320 that was made a few months ago and there is one difference that I noticed.

Forgive my lack of proper nomenclature, I'm used to the classic P-series. There is a smaller diameter pin, that the video I watched showed, being removed from the right side of the FCG. The left side of this pin is under the safety lever bar?

In my newer 320, this pin still protrudes from the right side, and looks the same as the pin in the video, but it isn't. It has a slight head to it and is flush with the left side of the FCU. You can't tell by just looking at it, but it has to be removed from the left.

In order to remove it, you must remove the safety lever bar? first.


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Posts: 1439 | Location: Central Va. | Registered: September 03, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks all for the advice
 
Posts: 99 | Registered: January 14, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I spoke with a Sig armorer from NH at the P320 display at the IWA show this past March about this specific topic. I told him I was using non-chlorinated brake cleaner and/or carb cleaner to spray-out the FCUs on my P320 pistols, following-up with Rem-oil aerosol, and asked if this practice would damage the components. He cautioned against the use of the automotive solvents, noting that, at the very least, I was removing all lube from the internal contact surfaces and run the risk of not being able to sufficiently re-apply lube after the cleaning process. It was also noted that certain automotive solvents may be harmful to some materials as well.

Rather, he advised that I use a firearms-specific cleaner, and low-pressure compressed air, if I felt it necessary. I'm guessing that a can of compressed air, such as is used as a keyboard cleaner, may work for this.

He then suggested that I try TW-25, which is easy to apply in aerosol form, or any other quality grease lube. I now use TW-25 aerosol, and it works great for this application, and is easy to apply as well. One word of caution, it does have an odor to it, so I use it in a well-ventilated area.

Both of my P320 9mm FS now have Gray Guns triggers, which I originally installed with their furnished Lucas grease product. But, for periodic cleaning and maintenance, the TW-25 works great.

YMMV, but that's what works for me.
 
Posts: 110 | Location: NW Ohio | Registered: January 04, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Just a side note...re-assembling the FCU is a bitch. Be reasonably careful with it. Mine basically fell apart while trying to install the Gray Guns trigger (my fault).


"Attack life, it's going to kill you anyway." Steve McQueen...
 
Posts: 4282 | Location: TEXAS | Registered: July 18, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks to all for your replies and advice.
 
Posts: 99 | Registered: January 14, 2015Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of yanici
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quote:
Originally posted by Merc50:
I spoke with a Sig armorer from NH at the P320 display at the IWA show this past March about this specific topic. I told him I was using non-chlorinated brake cleaner and/or carb cleaner to spray-out the FCUs on my P320 pistols, following-up with Rem-oil aerosol, and asked if this practice would damage the components. He cautioned against the use of the automotive solvents, noting that, at the very least, I was removing all lube from the internal contact surfaces and run the risk of not being able to sufficiently re-apply lube after the cleaning process. It was also noted that certain automotive solvents may be harmful to some materials as well.

Rather, he advised that I use a firearms-specific cleaner, and low-pressure compressed air, if I felt it necessary. I'm guessing that a can of compressed air, such as is used as a keyboard cleaner, may work for this.

He then suggested that I try TW-25, which is easy to apply in aerosol form, or any other quality grease lube. I now use TW-25 aerosol, and it works great for this application, and is easy to apply as well. One word of caution, it does have an odor to it, so I use it in a well-ventilated area.

Both of my P320 9mm FS now have Gray Guns triggers, which I originally installed with their furnished Lucas grease product. But, for periodic cleaning and maintenance, the TW-25 works great.

YMMV, but that's what works for me.


I've read reviews that the spray bottle treatment gummed up after a while. I haven't used it but I don't think I'd take the chance.


John

'Technically, It Is Not Illegal To Be Illegal In Massachusetts' ...MA Att. Gen. Martha Coakley
 
Posts: 1741 | Location: N.E. Massachusetts | Registered: June 05, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I think Eezox in the aerosol spray bottle would do the job rather nicely.
Smells good, too.

Bruce



Hanlon's Razor /prov./ A corollary of Finagle's Law, similar to Occam's Razor, that reads "Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by stupidity."

"It is better to be considered a house cat and sit on the lap of pretty girls than to be feared as a tiger and hunted by men."- T. Takamatsu
 
Posts: 2414 | Location: NV | Registered: October 06, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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So, I just cleaned, for the first time, a used P320 I bought.
It had a bunch of grease on the striker assembly and in the striker channel.
Is that normal and recommended?
I'm accustomed to Glocks where that is a big no-no.

Bruce



Hanlon's Razor /prov./ A corollary of Finagle's Law, similar to Occam's Razor, that reads "Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by stupidity."

"It is better to be considered a house cat and sit on the lap of pretty girls than to be feared as a tiger and hunted by men."- T. Takamatsu
 
Posts: 2414 | Location: NV | Registered: October 06, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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There should not be any significant lube in the striker channel. It will only collect dirt and cause problems.

I run a wet q-tip in the channel, followed by one or two dry ones, leaving a slight oil film. Light film on the striker parts, also.


___________________________
When seconds count, the police are only minutes away!
If you beat your swords into plowshares, you will become farmers for those who didn't!
Political Correctness is fascism pretending to be Manners-George Carlin
 
Posts: 1439 | Location: Central Va. | Registered: September 03, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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