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Inexpensive torque wrench for small screws? Login/Join 
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Hi All,

I've got a 365XL with the RomeoZero and I need to replace the battery in the Romeo. No problem there, but the owner's manual indicates that I need to re-tighten the allen screws to exactly 9 in-lbs. when I reattach the site to the gun. I can't seem to find an inexpensive tool for doing this. The best I've found on Amazon is this device from Wheeler, but its lowest torque setting is 10 in-lbs. Any suggestions would be most appreciated.

Dr. Blank


Dr. Aterius Gerstuheit Bartholomew Blank, Ph.D., Xy.Z., W30, Z28, P14
Deus Ex Machina (in training),
Heir to the House of Oldsmobile, and Ravager of Fudge Roundie Factories Everywhere
 
Posts: 26 | Registered: May 17, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
I can't tell if I'm
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I am not sure that the 1 in-pound difference is going to cause any significant problem. I have a Wheeler Fat Wrench and they list their accuracy at +/- 2 in-lbs up to 40 in-lbs. They also mention that lubricated fasteners require less torque than dry un-lubricated ones. So one could assume that there is some leeway built into these manufacturers torque settings and 1 in-lb difference shouldn't be a problem.


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Posts: 1488 | Location: Lake County South Dakota-pheasant country | Registered: June 20, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks! I was actually thinking the same thing--i.e., that the leeway built into the specs on these tools means I could ignore 1 in-lb difference. I just wondered if others knew something else about the equation that I was missing. Thanks again!


Dr. Aterius Gerstuheit Bartholomew Blank, Ph.D., Xy.Z., W30, Z28, P14
Deus Ex Machina (in training),
Heir to the House of Oldsmobile, and Ravager of Fudge Roundie Factories Everywhere
 
Posts: 26 | Registered: May 17, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Nothing wrong with doing what the manufacturer suggests. Most people probably 'snug' and maybe LOCTITE.

https://www.henkel-adhesives.c...n-threadlockers.html

This message has been edited. Last edited by: az4783054,
 
Posts: 10657 | Location: Somewhere north of a hot humid hell in the summer. | Registered: January 09, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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On that note, any particular type of thread lock or Loktite you would recommend for this sort of application?


Dr. Aterius Gerstuheit Bartholomew Blank, Ph.D., Xy.Z., W30, Z28, P14
Deus Ex Machina (in training),
Heir to the House of Oldsmobile, and Ravager of Fudge Roundie Factories Everywhere
 
Posts: 26 | Registered: May 17, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
I can't tell if I'm
tired, or just lazy
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A small dab of Blue Loctite should suffice.


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Posts: 1488 | Location: Lake County South Dakota-pheasant country | Registered: June 20, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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If blue 242 is what you have, that will work just fine. I added the link to the manufacturer above. Note the size of the fasteners on the bottle labels.
 
Posts: 10657 | Location: Somewhere north of a hot humid hell in the summer. | Registered: January 09, 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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If you have to buy some Loctite I would suggest purple (https://www.amazon.com/Loctite-555339-Purple-Strength-6-milliliter/dp/B0002KKTT0)
It is made specifically for small screws. If you get a bit to much blue on small screws it can be very hard to break loose. I have never had the screws on my RMR's come loose using the purple.
 
Posts: 142 | Location: Arizona | Registered: August 02, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Super helpful folks. Thanks!


Dr. Aterius Gerstuheit Bartholomew Blank, Ph.D., Xy.Z., W30, Z28, P14
Deus Ex Machina (in training),
Heir to the House of Oldsmobile, and Ravager of Fudge Roundie Factories Everywhere
 
Posts: 26 | Registered: May 17, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Be careful what you use as a threadlocker on those.
There isn't much surface area for the tool and you will strip it out pretty easy.

I use Vibra-tite for small screws like those.
https://www.amazon.com/Vibra-T...a-314552427989&psc=1

Mine came off with no drama using that stuff and stayed tight.
I don't use a wrench for small screws but it's a good idea to use one if you don't have a feel for it.
10 in-lbs isn't very much.
Tighten the screws incrementally, don't crank one down then the other.

I had to try several different 2mm allen wenches also to get one to fit snug.
Bugger those up and it's off to Sig unless you can drill small screws out.
Mine were allen head fasteners but I have heard that there are torx head also.
I used a magnifying glass to make sure what I had as they are pretty small.
 
Posts: 566 | Location: Portland Oregon | Registered: October 01, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Dr. Aterius Blank:
Hi All,

I've got a 365XL with the RomeoZero and I need to replace the battery in the Romeo. No problem there, but the owner's manual indicates that I need to re-tighten the allen screws to exactly 9 in-lbs. when I reattach the site to the gun. I can't seem to find an inexpensive tool for doing this. The best I've found on Amazon is this device from Wheeler, but its lowest torque setting is 10 in-lbs. Any suggestions would be most appreciated.

Dr. Blank


I'm not big on cheap measurement devices, and while I use various torque meters and wrenches and screwdrivers, none are cheap. They're all calibrated; the snap-on torque screwdrivers will do as low as 20 inch-ounces, or 50 nano-cm. You'll pay for it, though; 250 to 300.

If you only have two screws to put in, you'd be better off borrowing or taking it somewhere.

While people probably do guess at the torque value, if you're torquing the body of a sight, it stands to reason that even torque (screw or bolt-stretch) is more likely to have less impact on accuracy of the device, or specifically, less likely to affect the devices performance. You're less likely to fatigue or break the screw, too. Remember, torque isn't about how securely you hold it. It's about bolt stretch and flex, and ultimately, fatigue. That's why torque values are established.

Unequal torque doesn't just impact the improperly torqued fastener, but may overtighten others or cause others to loosen, or may unfairly load (or unload) other fasteners. Torque is prescribed for a reason. The specific reason for that application is known to the engineer or designer, but not necessarily the installer.
 
Posts: 5325 | Registered: September 13, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by babue:
If you have to buy some Loctite I would suggest purple

I use the purple for many small screws, including grip screws. It holds reasonably well, can be removed easily, and is very easy to clean the threads with acetone for reuse. It dries somewhat soft, while the blue holds stronger and dries crusty. I've never had a grip panel come loose on its own with purple loctite.



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Posts: 9610 | Location: South Congress AZ | Registered: May 27, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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