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I'm Fine
Picture of SBrooks
posted
So, I've read (and obey) the how to lube your sig thread and I understand pretty well all the points on a semi-auto pistol that need grease or oil.

But I only own one revolver and didn't grow up using them. Ruger SP101 .357mag. Anything in particular I should be using oil on, grease on, or NOT putting oil onto/into ?


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SBrooks
 
Posts: 3001 | Location: East Tennessee | Registered: August 21, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
That's just the
Flomax talking
Picture of GaryBF
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All I oil regularly are the extractor shaft and the crane pivots for the cylinder and frame. On occasion I will oil the mechanism.
 
Posts: 11201 | Location: St. Louis, Missouri | Registered: February 04, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of JAFO
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If you don't plan on shooting it for a long time, don't overdo the oil on the extractor shaft and star. I once had to clean up the remnants of excess gun oil that had evaporated from a long-stored revolver extractor. It left behind a shellac-like substance that was a bit of a pain to clean up and initially caused the star to stick to the cylinder.


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"Never forget those who died. Never forget who killed them." - Pat Rogers
 
Posts: 5120 | Location: S.A., TX | Registered: July 20, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
I'm Fine
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So, there aren't any danger spots like the firing pin channel on a semi-auto ?


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SBrooks
 
Posts: 3001 | Location: East Tennessee | Registered: August 21, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Not really from Vienna
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I try to avoid getting much oil under the extractor star because it attracts powder residue whch can tie the gun up.




 
Posts: 23090 | Location: Young American Teen Club | Registered: January 30, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of JAFO
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quote:
Originally posted by SBrooks:
So, there aren't any danger spots like the firing pin channel on a semi-auto ?


I'm not familiar with the SP101, but if it has a separate firing pin in the frame like a 642, you want to avoid lubing that for the same reasons.


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"Never forget those who died. Never forget who killed them." - Pat Rogers
 
Posts: 5120 | Location: S.A., TX | Registered: July 20, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Just don't use what one guy used on his gun he brought into a shop I used to work at.
Action was frozen up. We asked what kind of lube he used. His answer, olive oil!
It took a full day to clean it up and oil it correctly.
 
Posts: 336 | Location: The once great state of California | Registered: November 05, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of markstempski
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quote:
Originally posted by JAFO:
quote:
Originally posted by SBrooks:
So, there aren't any danger spots like the firing pin channel on a semi-auto ?


I'm not familiar with the SP101, but if it has a separate firing pin in the frame like a 642, you want to avoid lubing that for the same reasons.


I think all the rugers use a transfer bar as well as the newer N frame Smiths. I use Lucas extreme gun oil and basically just on parts that rub against other parts with the exception of the firing pin and the internal lock work. I think that is best done with the side plate off and two of my smiths are due for a thorough cleaning. You tube still has vids on cleaning and lubricating firearms. Take a look. lubrication lots easier to video. Disassembly and reassembly takes more skill to capture that one tricky part that seems to be part of every sig and CZ assembly. I managed to find some good you tube vids on m1 a lubricating that were very thorough. When one is ones own armorer pays to find any aid especially when one is not blessed with spatial reasoning or mechanical aptitude like myself


Mundus Vult Decipi
 
Posts: 999 | Location: Duvall WA, USA | Registered: February 08, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Ruger handguns are generally among the less friendly ones to take apart, so I'd clean and lubed with a spray, or let a real pistolsmith have the headache while smoothing the action. It is not all that expensive, and the results of the tuning might astound you. Several outstanding 'smiths currently do this sort of work.

If that isn't feasible, here's what I'd do as a life-long revlver shooter.

To do it youself, first clean the gun thoroughly. Then spray clean. I'd use a spray powder solvent everywhere, followed by liberal use of non- chlorinated brake cleaner, letting it flow out and drip. This procedure will ensure all powder residue and old lubricant is removed from the action. Work the action during all of this.

Once all the solvent has drained or evaporated, it is time to relube. You have a couplge choices.

1. Spray the interior with Hoppe's Elite Gun Oil with T3. Find it on Amazon. ,This is s fine oil fortified with both PTFE (teflon particles) and a white Moly-D. It goes on as a foam. Shake, apply with tube to nternals. Work the action while rotating the handgun. Apply to patches to lube extractor, etc. Wipe away excess as it drains. This oil will not dry, and you'll note how well it lubricates. You can apply a second coat, lightly in lje

2. Or you can purchasse, on Amazon, Lubegard's Universal spray lubricant. This can be used on tough jobs, such as lubricating an engine before reassembly. You can use the spray tube or the nozzle; outside, spray on a cotton swab or patch". This is an industrial lube from a company which markets mainly to industry and auto/truck fleets. The core ingredient is a patented ester of a plant wax, and provides tough, long-last lubrication and protection.

In both cases, allow any excess to drain away, work the action, while rotating the firearm, and be sure to wipe the chambers and bore clear. You might wish to reapply in 24-hours.

Either treatment will yield a smooth working, protected inner mechanism. Neither will gum or form varnish or be difficult to remove and replace, if, for instance, the handgun takes a dunk in some salt water.

For protection against fingerprints and such, I simply use a wax-bearing soft cloth sold for guns and knives. It leaves no oils which could affect primers.


Brian
 
Posts: 17 | Location: Charlotte, NC | Registered: July 27, 2017Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Picture of bobandmikako
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If you ever wanted to disassemble your SP-101 to give it a good cleaning and lube the internals, it's not hard at all. Ruger has videos in their revolver Tech Tip website.
https://ruger.com/videos.html?...62880411&cat=3769277. There are separate videos on disassembly, reassembly and the full cleaning in between.

I've normally only broken down Ruger revolvers if I get a used one that needs some attention. Normally I just very lightly oil the parts already mentioned and maybe put a drop or two in a frame opening for it to work it's way around inside.



十人十色
 
Posts: 1324 | Location: Alabama | Registered: June 15, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I used a rod and reel grease, also marketed for firearms, something-or-other gold. It's still in shops. It worked great if regularly cleaned and replaced. I came back at the end of one summer to find slides welded shut, and parts that wouldn't move. In fact, I have a Dan Wesson 1911 that I need to get apart and clean; it's still stuck shut from that junk.

I use MPro7, TW-25, and some of the Lucas products right now, and also some of the wilson lubes and greases. No problems.

In a revolver, I apply grease to the action, oil to pivot points, light grease to the crane pivot, and a drop of oil at any contact points inside, and very little to the extractor/star area, to prevent buildup. I also put a bit of grease on each end of the hammer strut. There is no point oiling the firing pin. It would serve no purpose.
 
Posts: 2500 | Registered: September 13, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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